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THE 



FORUM 



JANUARY, 1905 



FIRE NUMBER 




tebanon Valley College Administration Building on Fire— View from the Kant 



Lebanon Valley College 



WHEN YOU FAIL 

To get the work 
you wish in the 
ordinary Print- 
ing Office — Try 
Us. . . . . . 

A. C. M. Hiester, 



-ANN VILLE, PA. 



WILL & GANTZ, 
Fresh . . . 



Groceries 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



Geo. Krause Hardware Co., 

Hardware 



Headquarters for Athletic Goods, Base Ball Supplies, Tents, Ham- 
mocks. Refrigerators, Etc. 



BICYCLES AND BICYCLE SUNDRIES. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



J. C. Schmidt 

Jeweler 
and Optician 

743-45 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PLNN'A 



GOOD THINGS ONLY ARE GIFTS 
FROM US. Also REPAIRING. 



* Gallatin « 

Headquarters For 

Tine Confectionery, Choice 
fruits ana nuts. 



RESTAURANT ATTACHED 

Oysters In All Styles 



Why Not? 



BUY YOUR 

10 Per Cent, Discount to Students 

FROM US 

CILLEY & BENNETCH, 



SHOES 



169 North Ninth Street, 
LEBANON, PA. 



THE FORUM. 

High-Grade Footwear 



THE RALSTON SHOE THE QUEEN QUALITY SHOE 

FOR MEN — For style and service The best yet of all shoes 

these have no equal— PRICE $4 FOR WOMEN PRICE $3 and $3.50 



THE COMFORT SHOE STORE, 

B. RUTH & CO., Proprietors. 

h and Cumberland Streets LEBANON, PA. 



Wanted 



College Students During Their 
Vacation Can Easily Make $20 to 
$30 Per Week. 

WRITE FOR PARTICULARS 

The Universal Mfg. Co. 

PITTSBURG, PA. 

Money to Lend to Students 

on prospects ? Can not afford it ! Why not get your life insured ? That will 
furnish the necessary protection, a good investment and the easiest method of saving 
money. You should go into the 

Northwestern Life Insurance Co. 

Because it has proportionately the 

LOWEST EXPENSES rmnnmmi* r> EST DIVIDENDS 

OWEST DEATH RATE TH ™^ RE |<EST CONTRACT 
ARGEST EARNINGS ulvIib *-*EST SATISFACTION 

FOR PROOF OF THESE STATEMENTS CONSULT 

H. T. ATKINS, 826 Cumberland St., Lebanon, General Agent 
A. 6. MOYER and C. C. PETERS, College Dormitory, Special Agents. 



THE FORUM 



Catering ... 

Weddings DIETRICH'S, 

OUR SPECIALTY I0I 5 N - Third Street, 325 Market Street. 

Fancy Ices, Cakes, Confections Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shipped Anywhere. Correspondence Solicited. 



flnnville Electric Eight 
Company 

Electric Light Electric Wiring 

Electrical Supplies 

ol every description 

annville] 7 , PA, 

Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
Dentist 

Reductions to Students 
72 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

THOS, H, ELLIOTT, 
Shoemaker 

orner Main and White Oak Sts., 
ANNVILLE, PA, 

JS/L. IF_ BATDOEF 

Dealer In 

Ladies' and Gents' 
Furnishings 
Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 

WILLIAM KIEBLER 

Eagle Hotel 
Barber Shop 

MAIN STREET, ANNVILLE, PA. 



JNO. S. SHOPE 

Queensware 
Groceries Hardware 

LADIES' and GENTS' 

Furnishings 

Discount to Students 

West Main St., Annville, Pa. 
JOSEPH G. KELCHNER 
Butcher 

Daily Meat Market of home dressed meats 

Also a full line of Smoked Meats. 
Annville, - ✓ Pa, 

W, C. WOOLF 

Groceries and Provisions 

65 East Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 

Setphen Hubertis 

BOOK 
BINDER 

320 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 



THE FORUM. 



M. A. B LAZIER 





Spares no Pains in Giving His Patrons 
Polite Attention and Good 



Which look Artistic and 
True To Life. 

Reductions to Student 

STUDIO 
839 Cumb. St., LEBANON, PA. 



Class of 
81. 



C. E. Rauch, cl ? 

Offers Special Discounts 
to Students on 

Merchant Tailoring. 



10th and Cumberland Streets, 
LEBANON, PA. 



ftoffntan Bros. 



SELL 



UJalRover ana Sorosls 



10 Per Cent, off to Students, 
opp. court ijouse, Eebanon, Pa. 



College Alumni 

Who lived in Annville during their College career 
should be sure to 

READ THE ANNVILLE JOURNAL 

And get all the Town and College News, 

OUR PRESSES TURN DDTlSJTTMr* FROM THE 
OUT ALL KINDS OF lKllN 1 liNVj PLAIN SIM. 
PLE EVERY DAY KIND TO THE MOST ARTISTIC, 

Every Job printed by us secures the best attention 
and has never failed to prove satisfactory, 

We are always pleased to show samples of our work 

Both Phones The Annyille Journal 

The Forum is a product of our press. 



Contents. 



Wagner's Use of Sagas - - - -76 

A Book About Oxford - - - 78 

True Worth - - - . -81 

The Fire 83 

The Fire and Philo. - - - -85 

The Fire Destroyed College Buildings - 86 

Editorial - . . _ -89 

Alumni Notes - - - - - 91 

College Notes - - - . -92 

Personal Notes - - - - 93 

Directory «... 34 

Exchange Notes - - . . -95 



THE FORUM. 



Volume XVIII. JANUARY, 1905 Number 4 



Wagner's Use of the Sagas. 

There have come down to modern times two sets of myths or 
legends, the classical mythology of the Greeks and the sagas of the 
Teutonic peoples. Classical mythology from Homeric times down to 
our own period has been the basis of a great mass of literature and has 
furnished subjects for artists in music, painting and sculpture. The 
northern legends, after having been collected about the tenth or eleventh 
centuries by unknown authors into poems in the Homeric fashion, were 
buried in the archives of old monasteries and forgotten. This happened 
probably because they were written in the language of a barbarous 
people while all the energy of scholars under the influence of the Roman 
church was bent toward acquiring proficiency in the use of Latin. The 
best known of these poems whose manuscripts were discovered only in 
the eighteenth century, are the Scandinavian "Edda" and the German 
"Niebelungen Lied." In some points they closely resemble each other 
and they have both since furnished literary and artistic material. 

The definite object of Richard Wagner was to create a national 
drama which should be German in spirit and in form. His first care 
was to choose German themes. With this in view he first studied Ger- 
maupiistory. From that he turned to the rich store of legends of the 
northern peoples and the German writings of the middle ages. Here he 
obtained his material for nearly all his subsequent work, for Tannhauser, 
Lohengrin, The Ring and Parsifal. Upon these legends he based operas 
which are as German in spirit as are the sources from which they were 
drawn. The legend which haunted Wagner, which made the greatest 
impression on his mind was the story of the Niebelungen ring and how it 
caused the destruction of Wotan and the other gods. Even while writing 
the "Lohengrin" the idea of making a musical drama of this legend was 
already in his mind, and as early as 1848 the poetry of Siegfried's death 
was written. As the source of his story he followed the "Edda" rather 
than the "Niebelungen Lied." Out of this grew a series of four operas 
known as "The Ring" or the tetralogy. 



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These operas "Das Rheingold," "Die Walkure," "Siegfried" and 
"Die Gotterdammenmg" are the wort of Wagner's third and best 
period. Indeed, "Das Rheingold" inaugurated the third period. In 
these operas he dispenses entirely with the conventional chorus. 
Though in "Das Rheingold" he has the Rhine maidens' song, in the last 
of the series, the Gotterdammerung, at only one place is more than one 
voice singing. In these he brings to its fulfillment his ideal union of the 
arts of poetry, music and scenic effects in producing musical drama. 
Wagner's method in producing effects was perfectly conscious and partly 
mechanical. Of the three causes of the effects, music, poetry and paint- 
ing, each was of equal value. There was to be no break in the continu- 
ity of the scenes. When the poetry stops the orchestra speaks a langu- 
age of its own. This is done by means of clearly distinguishable 
motives. Every important character has his motive and his entrance 
into the action is heralded by the orchestra. The Wotan motive, the 
Brunhilde motive, the Rhine maiden motive and the others are the same 
throughout the four operas and are as strong factors in the continuity of 
"The Ring" as the poetry itself. 

The legends of the "Edda" would have made an effective drama 
even if treated in the old way. The story as told by Wagner opens with 
the song of the Rhine maidens. As they sing, Alberich the dwarf and 
ruler of the Niebelungs, tries to woo them. To turn aside his attention 
they tell him of the gold which only one who puts aside love can get. 
Alberich immediately loves gold more than aught else and therefore 
secures it. He then has it made into the Niebeluug ring which gives him 
power over all the world and by it he makes the Niebelungs his slaves. 
Meanwhile Wotan has had a stronghold built by the giants to whom he 
promised to give Freia, the goddess of beauty. When the castle is 
finished he does not wish to give up Freia. He therefore compromises 
by giving to the giants all the gold of the Niebelungs and the ring and 
the tarnhelmet all of which he got from Alberich by the cunning of the 
fire-god I,oge. By means of the tarnhelmet the giant transforms him- 
self into a great dragon to guard his riches and the ring. 

Wotan has two children half mortal, Siegmunde and Sieglinde. 
Sieglinde is forcibly carried off by Hunding. The Walkure opens with 
the scene in Hunding's hut where Siegmunde comes as a stranger to 
seek shelter. He makes love to Sieglinde and they flee. But owing to 
Fricka's interference Siegmunde is obliged to fight with Hunding with- 
out the promised protection of the valkyrie Brunhilde. However Sieg- 



THE FORUM 78 

munde has his father's sword which he pulled out of the tree in Hund- 
ing's hut thereby revealing his identity. Contrary to orders Brunhilde 
protects Siegmunde in the fight. But Wotan breaks the sword and 
allows Hunding to slay his son, though he himself kills Hunding imme- 
diately after. The opera ends with the scene between Wotan and 
Brunhilde where for disobedience Wotan condemns Brunhilde to become 
mortal woman and marry one who knows not fear. 

The third opera of the "Ring" deals with Siegfried the son of 
Siegmunde and Sieglinde. He was brought up by the dwarf Mime. 
Mime fails to mend Wotan's sword when Siegfried, angered does it him- 
self. Then he goes out to slay the dragon and secures the ring. 
Guided by a bird Siegfried finds the sleeping Brunhilde, breaks Wotan's 
spear, passes through the flames and makes the valkyrie his wife. 

The Gotterdammerung is a continuation of Siegfried's adventures. 
Hagen, the son of Alberich, wishes Gunther to marry Brunhilde and 
promises that if Siegfried does this, he shall be given Gutrune as wife. 
First, he gives Siegfried a potion which makes him forget Brunhilde and 
love Gutrune. So Siegfried gladly undertakes the commission and 
forcibly brings Brunhilde to Gunther after having taken away the ring. 
When Brunhilde finds that Siegfried has married Gutrune she is very 
angry and it is decided that Siegfried must die. During a hunt next 
day Siegfried is stabbed by Hagen, after having revealed the truth. 
Brunhilde orders a funeral pyre to be built and as the pyre burns she 
rushes with her horse into the flames. Meanwhile the Rhine comes up 
to the pyre and the Rhine maidens snatch back their ring. Hagen, who 
tried to save the ring, is pulled under and drowned. In the back ground 
is Walhalla in flames. The end of the Gods is at hand and the curse of 
the ring fulfilled. This closes the story of the "Ring" which together 
with Wagner's other work has revolutionized German opera and had an 
incalculable effect on other musical composition. 

H. B. Brkssler, '05 . 

A Book About* Oxford. 

Mr. Jules Lemaitre, one of France's greatest critics, who himself 
writes " as easily as he breathes, "as he said of De Maupassant, closes 
one of his articles on a recent drama drawn from that of an Indian author 
of eighteen centuries ago, in which he shows how modern in spirit men 
were even then, with these words : " Ah ! how useless is it that we have 
come ! What are we doing upon the earth, anyhow, I pray you ?" 



79 



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These words express the natural pessimism which creeps at times 
into all hearts, bu if the author I am going to write about could know 
what joy he gave to one poor American, he would never be justified in 
echoing the brilliant Frenchman's temporary, let us hope momentary, 
discouragement. 

This author is Mr. John Corbin, a young American journalist of 
New York, who more than five years ago wrote an important little book 
called "The Elizabethan Hamlet. " His latest book, " An American 
at Oxford, " is the the one that I wish to write about. 

To be sure, the book is of greatest interest to students and 
teachers, but there is a wealth of interest in it for any American who 
wishes to be broader and wiser, or if the more logical reader objects to my 
phrasing, wiser and therefore broader. 

We are told at the start that Oxford University is made up of 
many small colleges, Baliol, Christ's church, Braseuose, and so forth, 
each having separate buildings and its own teachers, with about one 
hundred and fifty students. 

Social formalities are very abundant and confusing to the 
freshman who, pity those on this side of the ocean, remain such only 
about two months. Out of all the formality comes in the end an even- 
ness of spirt that is unknown in our large institutions of learning. 

The students all have to wear gowns in the evening, and their 
leaving the building is very carefully watched. For late guests each 
host is fined and belated students have perilous difficulties in climbing 
over the walls decorated with iron spikes and broken shards of crockery. 

In the dining-hall no seats are assigned and men can wander about 
until they find the most congenial companions. The dons file in after 
the students are seated, amid rattling of glasses and banging of cutlery, 
and take seats on a raised platform, a survival of the dais of Cedric's 
hall in Ivanhoe. They are the court of appeals as to offenses committed 
atid impose the fine of one pence for punning, an old Oxford custom. 

The joking and frolicking of students is called ragging, and the 
deans employ " scouts " to assist in catching the over-wayward. 

The seniors are crowded out of the college halls by incoming 
freshmen each year, and then they must take up quarters in the old 
town which are very inferior to their dormitory lodgings. These town 
homes are now called "diggings," and in the early days of Oxford, 
before the system of colleges developed, they were called " chamberde- 
kyns. " 



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80 



One of the best things in Mr. Corbin's account is the emphasis he 
lays upon the amateurish spirit of English athletics. In all branches of 
sport the aim is to work for the joy of the playing instead of for the 
victory, as in America. Their superiority in rowing comes from contin- 
uous life upon the water. Each college has a barge for a club-house, and 
men even "go upon the waves to read and smoke. They have no 
special training seasons, and nearly all the students in each college are 
on the various teams. More games of football for instance, are played, 
thus lessening the importance of any one and making the sport as com- 
mon an experience as possible. 

One feels, after reading this book, that the chief mission of 
Oxford is to develop true sportsmen and socially representative English- 
men, rather than to develop scholars. 

The students have examination periods twice during their four- 
year course. The first ones come about midway in the course, and these 
are called " moderations, " or, more familiarly, <: mods. " One promin- 
ent object of this examination is to train the students how to write a 
paper. The final examination is taken before degrees are conferred. 
More stress is laid on the composition of the paper than upon the facts 
laid down. The examination for honors is much severer than that for 
ordinary passmen. 

Students are scarcely brought into touch with the professors, all 
the teaching bing done by the dons or tutors, who themselves are little 
mere than fashionable guides to learnig. 

The scientific work of the university is the most meager. The 
laboratories are poorly equipped and very small, and students seldom 
elect science. The only modern lanuage that receives scholarly attention 
is English. 

Oxford University began as early as 1167, probably with a migra- 
tion of students from the then world-famous ! University of Paris. At 
this time, and for many centuries afterward, Oxford was a guild, not 
unlike other trade guilds of the time. Owing to lack of text-books the 
lecture system was exclusively used in the early days. The university 
was a natural gateway to the church for its students, and if a student or 
" clerk, " as they were the called, was more important than a carpenter, 
it was not becausa of the work in which he was engaged. Men were not 
educated above the work of the world at this time. 

Through its long history Oxford has had the usual ups amd 
downs of fate. The students at one time were mainly drunkards and 



8i 



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gamblers, and it has not been so many centuries ago since, on the eve of 
examination, the student invited the faculties to drink, and they drank 
so much that about all the degrees they were sober enough to confer was 
that of ' ' bacchanal of arts. ' ' 

Mr. Corbin thinks that English universities ( fit their students to 
represent England better than ours train men to represent the Uuited 
States, and he thinks we would gain much by dividing our large institu- 
tions into groups of small colleges with single administration. 

I heartily advise students, teachers, and all wide-awake individuals 
to read this charming, unprejudiced, though searching volume. 

N. C. SCHLICHTER, '97. 

True Worth. 

Every man exerts a positive influence in society whether he 
wishes to do so or not. 

There are many who seem to be inactive, and we are inclined to 
think that their influence counts but little, or nothing, in the lives of 
their fellows, yet unconsciously they set powers in motion that never 
stop, and exert a silent, positive influence for good or evil, making the 
life of every other a little better or a little worse. 

All mankind can be divided into two classes ; those who simply 
exist, and those who really live ; the former presenting a most pathetic 
picture, while the latter demands our admiration and esteem. 

The most to be pitied, and gloomiest of all God's creatures is the 
man or woman without a purpose in life, yet we meet such every day, 
not only among the illiterate, and degraded, but in our colleges and 
universities as well. 

Can it be that in this enlightened twentieth century, with all its 
advantages and privileges with the call coming from all directions and 
from every vocation for young men and women, that in the face of it 
all, so many with sound bodies and brilliant intellects will become 
mcrbid and blue and defiantly say there is nothing to live for ? 

I do not discredit the fact that there are times and circumstances 
which tend to make us sad, or give us the " blues, " but I do affirm that 
no one has a right to wilfully spread the disease until the whole commu- 
nity has a bluish tint. What we need to do when inclined to catch the 
"blues" is to think serious'y of those less fortunate than ourselves, the 
thousands in darkness and superstition, and if a cure is not effected, visit 



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82 



an almshouse or insane asylum, and fif we are not made to reverently 
thank God that we are not as other men are, ours is a hopeless case 
indeed and suicide is the only remedy and ought be applied. 

Every one may be happy if he will. The old world with all its 
apparent darkness, has a brighter side, and if clouds of sorrow and 
gloom do sometimes dim our horizon yet by our own determination we 
can, if we will penetrate the mist, roll away the clouds and look on the 
brighter side and by so doing ennoble and sweeten our own life and 
those of our fellows, causing each day to bring with it, its benediction. 

The man who really lives is he who has a lofty purpose, and high 
ideals, who looks upon life itself as a vast peril whose supreme value 
makes its use more imperative, and its misuse, more terrible and whose 
whole life is a continual striving toward reaching his goal. 

Success in life depends less on strength of mind than on character, 
and while mental power may be needful to achievement, yet self restraint, 
sympathy for others, courage and determination are the surest guarantee 
to success in any vocation in life. 

True worth is not only found in him who goes to the field of battle, 
or the man who wears the garb of office, nor should we limit our homage 
and respect to these, for many as brave and true heart beats beneath 
the grimy coat of the workman at his daily toil, the sooty jacket of the 
engineer, or the calico gown of the factory girl or the mother in the 
home. While we recognize the hero ot the battle field, let us remember 
that the physician who daily risks his life for his patient is just as great. 
The teacher or professor who gives his life for his student is just as hon- 
orable, and the wife and mother who spends many sleepless nights 
watching by the bedside of loved ones is just as brave. 

The on who is truly great is he who believes and practices 
the universal brotherhood of man, and gives to every man his 
very best in action, word and deed, who knows that it is good to be 
great, but greater to be good, and at all times sees something to do and 
strives to do it and by his smile of cheer, kind words, noble deeds, and 
his very life ennobles and brightens others. In such a man only is 
found true worth. 

G. I. R. '05. 

Prof. Schlichter delivered an address before the York Y. M. C. A. 
on Sunday Jan. 22. 



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The Fire. 

The fire began about ten minutes to seven o'clock on Saturday- 
evening, December 24. About this time a young man from New York 
who was visiting his parents on College Avenue, passed the old building 
and seeing a light in the basement under President Roop's office, he went 
into the building and discovered that the flames had already reached the 
third floor and that they were attacking the roof of the old wing. He 
immediately gave the alarm. 

Prof. Schlichter was the first person to enter the building after 
the fire was discovered. He sent at once for Prof. McFadden, under 
whose direction much of the material in the laboratories was saved. As 
soon as Prof. Schlichter entered the main doors he saw that the des- 
truction of the building which had been the home of hundreds of the 
sons of Lebanon Valley was doomed beyond rescue. The fire seems to 
have taken its course up the old elevator shaft setting fire to each floor 
as it went and gaining much headway before the alarm could be given. 
A high wind blowing from the southeast drove the smoke through the 
halls on the second and third floors as soon as the windows leading to the 
fire escapes were kicked in by men anxious to save the students' belong- 
ings. 

Prof. McFadden had a narrow escape fifteen minutes after the fire 
started in rescuing the balances in the chemical laboratory on the second 
floor, which proves clearly that rescue of property by ordinary methods 
and average on-lookers was an impossibility. Only trained firemen 
could have been of assistance in this. 

President Roop was one of the first to arrive on the scene and he 
made a desperate attempt to remove valuables from his office. This 
being impossible he helped to rescue the contents of his private office. 
He then gave valuable assistance in clearing the physical and the 
biological laboratories. 

The Lebanon fire-men could not come on account of the condition 
of the roads which contained about a foot of snow, and by nine o'clock 
the ruins only remained. Then, the members of the faculty, town 
students and residents finished carrying to safe places the apparatus, 
chairs and so forth that were liberally spread over the campus. By 
eleven o'clock all was quiet again in sleepy little Annville, and then only 
the awfulness of the calamity, with the absence of the brilliant and 
mighty spectacle of flame, began to dawn upon the friends of the 
College. 



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84 



The Forum has not room to mention the names of the many men 
who helped to save the property that was saved, but to all such it ex- 
tends on behalf of the faculty and students thanks unbounded. 

The fall of the cupola and the rumors of explosions in the base- 
ment laboratories were the causes of excitement in the large crowds that 
witnessed the conflagration. No one was hurt except freight clerk, Sam 
Speraw, who was slightly injured by being hit on the head. 

The Lebanon Report gives this graphic paragraph : 

"Heavy volumes of smoke preceded the bursting of flames through 
the roof. The lower part of the cupola was gradually eaten away, and 
a tongue of flame was seen to shoot up alongside the dome. Cornices 
and supports upon which rested the one thousand pound college bell were 
eagerly devoured. The flagstaff upon which floated the American flag 
on holiday occasions and the large iron railing encircling the belfry part 
of the tower where classes sometimes clashed in contests for supremacy 
were viewed for the last time by former students, who perhaps recalled 
some exciting incident of the days that are gone. The flames licked 
about the dome and the heavy wooden timbers supporting it were swept 
away from their fastenings like so many straws. It was plain that the 
old dome, with its hallowed associations, would not withstand the angry 
element much longer, as the entire top of that part of the structure was 
being devoured by the fire, and with a crash, accompanied by dense 
clouds of smoke and burning embers, it fell westward, landing upon the 
rear part of the structure, underneath which was the old chapel, until 
lately used as a place for playing basket ball. Both sides from the 
third floor fell in to the top of the chapel windows. ' ' 

Mr. Elmer Heilman tried to get to the hall of the Philokosmian 
Literary Society as soon as he reached the scene but he was beaten back 
by flame and smoke. The Society lost everything and will be obliged to 
reconstruct its records complete. President Roop lost many valuable 
papers, books, and all his personal and official correspondence. Prof. 
Jackson lost his notes and theses prepared during his three years' resi- 
dence at Harvard University and all his personal effects including many 
rare original photographs and paintings, and the best selections from his 
private library at Abingdom, his home. Prof. Spessard also lost a 
valuable collection of books and personal documents. The losses of the 
students will amount to between eight and ten thousand dollars. 

As to the origin the following paragraph from The Annville 
Journal will be of interest: 



85 



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How the fire originated is a mystery. A large number of people 
express the belief that it was of incendiary origin, because the flames 
were discovered at a point in the building, where the chances for a fire 
to break out were almost impossible. Others are of the opinion that the 
fire started in one of the students' rooms on the third floor. Communi- 
cating with the hallway and from thence spreading rapidly to other parts 
of the building. It appears certain that the conflagration did not start 
through the heating plant, the chemical laboratory or electric light wire. 

The Fire and the Philokosmian Literary Society. 

When the administration building of Lebanon Valley College was 
destroyed by fire on the evening of December 24, 1904, many things 
went down in the ruins that time and money can never restore. Many 
things of historic value, with which were associated the hallowed 
memories of nearly forty years were mercilessly consumed by the fierce 
flames of that memorable night. 

Many loyal hearts turned with sadness to familiar rooms and 
scenes in the old College building that is no more. Many students, far 
and near, naturally first thought of their personal loss — books, clothing 
and other valuables. Many thought of the destruction of their dear old 
College home. But many a staunch Philo thought first of all of the 
magnificent hall, just recently so elegantly furnished, the beautiful 
piano, all achieved by the labors of devoted and self-sacrificing members 
of "old Philo." But more than this, for true Philos and their many 
friends will soon replace these, there was the sad thought of the total 
destruction of all the records, minutes, roll of all members, past and 
present, the history of all the past thirty-eight years gone up in smoke, 
and to-day the Philokosmian Literary Society of Lebanon Valley College 
has nothing but its past record as it is written in the lives of its many 
hundreds of faithful and ever loyal members scattered here and there in 
every calling and profession of life, men who have honored the Society 
and the College, men who would always "rather be than seem." Some 
of these have completed their life work and have gone to their eternal 
rest. Their names were upon the roll of honor in the Philo hall and 
went down in the ruins but their memories are cherished in the minds 
and hearts of those who remain as the active members. They are honor- 
ed for the work they wrought both in the establishment and mainte- 
nance of the Society as well as what they have done in the spheres of 



* 



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tnore active life to which they had consecrated their powers. In addi- 
tion to this the Society also has nearly fifty active members who have 
pledged loyalty and devotion to the interests of the old Society and who 
will stand by it in this calamity with nobler and higher purpose than 
ever, and who by the aid of ex-members and friends will speedily re- 
place that which it is possible to replace, so that the work in which 
they were so zealously engaged will go on with even greater earnestness. 
Already meetings have been held and plans for the future considered. 

Next to the spirit of loyalty to the College comes loyalty to the 
literary Society, and right nobly do the sons of Philo manifest this 
.spirit. We are sure that every ex-member will come to the aid of the 
"boys" in replacing piano, furniture, etc., and even in the erection of a 
hall if such should be the decision. Rally Philos, and out of apparent 
disaster shall come a greater and a grander future, and the record you 
will make shall outshine even the glorious record of the past; not a 
record on paper only, for that may burn, but a record in noble and true 
manhood that shall live to bless humanity in years to come. We hope 
ere long some one will commit to writing what facts of the history can 
be gathered from members and friends of the Society, so that coming 
generations may know what was done by the noble men who were the 
founders and promoters of the Philokosmian Literary Society of Lebanon 
Valley College. Prof. J. E. Lehman, '74. 

X X 

The Fire-Destroyed College Building. 

After the purchase of nearly eleven acres of additional ground 
from "John D. Biever, Christian Carmany and Peter Graybill, and the 
signing of the College charter by Governor Geary, on the seventh day of 
April, 1867, a building committee consisting of Rev. George A. Mark, 
Prof. Thomas R. Vickory and Rudolph Herr, was appointed to contract 
for the erection of a three-story brick building in accordance with plans 
and specifications previously drawn by architect Benjamin B. Lehman, of 
Lebanon. The building was originally planned to include a large refectory 
with kitchen and other culinary attachments on the ground floor, a large 
chapel, a president's office, reception room and four recitation rooms on 
the first floor, two recitation rooms and a toilet room on the seccnd floor, 
and dormitory rooms and toilet on the third floor. 

The contract for the erection of the building was awarded to Mr. 
Rudolph Herr and ground was broken by members of the building 



8 7 



THE FORUM 



committee and Rev. E. Light, the writer and others on Tuesday morn- 
ing, May 28th, and work progressed rapidly until Friday, August 23rd, 
on which day in the forenoon at ten o'clock the corner-stone of the 
building was laid with impressive ceremonies, in the presence of the 
Faculty and students of the college and many other interested spectators. 
The Rev. William S. H. Keys, pastor of the United Brethren church at 
Harrisburg, officiated, placed the contents into a tin-lined box in the 
stone, and offered the prayer. After these exercises the large concourse 
of students, teachers, ministers and friends formed into line and marched 
to the United Brethren church in town where interesting and eloquent 
addresses on the educational work of the State and in the United 
Brethren church, were delivered by Hon. J. P. Wickersham, LL. D.,. 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction and Rev. Ezekiel Light, P.E., 
of Lebanon. This occasion was graced with the presence of a very 
distinguished visitor in this country in the interest of general education 
in the person of Senor Sarmiento, minister plenopotentiary of the 
Argentine Confederatiou, South America, to our government at Wash- 
ington, and who by special request made a brief address in broken 
English, Spanish being his native language, expressing his gratification 
and good wishes for the new and growing institution. 

In the erection of the building Mr. Herr, being a lumber dealer,, 
furnished that material himself and John N. Smith, now an aged 
resident of this town, supplied the brick. Abraham Kauffman and 
Israel Gruber, both deceased, had charge of the carpenter and brick 
work respectively, and Joel Boltz, now a retired octogenarian of 
Annville, was the boss plasterer. 

In the progress of the work during the fall of the year the pro- 
fessors and students very frequently assisted in carrying the large timbers 
into the building and placing them in position, and on the evening of 
Thursday, the nineteenth day of December, at the close of the school 
term a public oratorical exhibition was given in the new chapel by the 
students. 

Work on the building continued during the winter and spring of 
1868 and at the end of the college year the closing exercises were held 
in it. Rev. William H. S. Keys preached the first sermon on Sunday 
morning, June fourteenth, and on the following Tuesday evening, the 
sixteenth, John H. Weiss, Esq., of Harrisburg, now President Judge of 
the courts of Dauphin county, delivered an interesting address before 
the Philokosmian Literary Society. Before the opening of the Fall term 



THE FORUM 



88 



of that year the contractor pronounced the building completed and as 
such it was accepted from his hands by the building committee, and 
steward, professors and students at once took possession. The entire 
-cost of the building including the completion of the cupola and the portico 
at the south entrance of the building was $31,000. 

The growth of the college patronage demanded additional accom- 
modations for students and increased facilities to impart instruction, and 
hence in 1900 a building committee of three — Dr. Hervin U. Roop, H. 
H. Kreider and Isaac B. Haak — was appointed with authority to contract 
for the addition of a large wing to the building on the north. Plans 
were prepared and the contract was given to Mr. Benjamin H. Engle, of 
Harrisburg, who within a year erected a fine three-story brick wing at 
a cost of $18,000, which practically doubled the capacity of the building, 
and from this time the entire plant was known as the Administration 
Building. For many years before it was known as the North College 
building. In this wing were rooms for the entire department of natural 
science with its physical apparatus, together with chemical and biological 
laboratories, the museum and many additional recitation and dormitory 
rooms. 

The first regular commencement exercises occurred in the chapel 
of this building on the sixteenth day of June, 1870, on which occasion 
two gentlemen and one lady were graduated, namely, William B. Boden- 
horn and Albert C. Rigler, both deceased, and Mary A. Weiss, now Mrs. 
John R. Reitzel, of Chicago, Illinois. This was followed by annual 
commencement exercises for twenty-eight years, the last occurring in 
June, 1898. 

From its halls many young men and women decorated with the 
honors of the college, have gone out and have achieved success in life 
and thereby reflected honor upon their alma mater. 

On Christmas eve of 1904, at about six o'clock fire broke out and 
in less than five hours the entire building with nearly all its valuable 
contents, save brick and mortar was consumed, and about everything of 
a material nature that added historic value to Lebanon Valley College, 
was in utter ruin. Ex.Prbs. E. Benj. Bierman. 

J. B. Showers spent his vacation in the southwestern part of the 
State. He visited Washington and Jefferson College at Washington, Pa., 
preaching at Claysville, Fairmount and other towns in that vicinity. 



89 THE FORUM 

THE FORUM. 

VoLXVfll. JANUARY, 1905 No. 4 

Editoivin-Chief, 

P. E. MATHIAS, '05. 

Associate Editors, 

ALICE CROWELL, '05 RAY G. EIGHT, '06 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS : 
ETHEL MYERS, '07 JOHN C. RUPP, '06 

MERLE M. HOOVER, '06 EDWARD E. KNAUSS, '07 

Business Managers s 

J. WARREN KAUFMANN, '06, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 

C. E. SHENK, '06 MAX P. LEHMAN, '07 

The Forum is published each month during the college year by the Students of Lebanon- 
Valley College. 

TERMS :— Subscription Price, 50 cents a Year. Single Copy, 10 cents. 

All business matter should be addressed to The Forum, Annville, Pa. ; all literary matter to 
P. E. Mathias, Annville, Pa. 

Once a subscriber, always a subscriber, until notice for discontinuance, accompanied with all 
arrearages, has been received. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second-class mail matter. 



Editorial. 

Lebanon Valley College suffered an enormous loss as a result of 
the great fire on December 24, 1904 which destroyed the main building. 
Though the loss to the college was very great, yet the loss to the stu- 
dents was proportionately as great, if not greater. Many of them are 
literally fighting their way through college having no resources to fall 
upon but their own. Their books which have been burned up and are 
neededfor the present term have however, been replaced through the 
kindness of the college and the book companies, and theyhave been gen- 
erously aided in other ways. The people of Annville have shown them- 
selves to be highspirited and well minded. 

When the students were put into great inconvenience and dis- 
comfort because the dormitories were destroyed by the conflagration, 
they had the full sympathy of the people of Annville who kindly and 
liberally opened up their homes so that the college could continue its 
work and care for its students. The students justly feel grateful toward 
these kind people for their generosity. Much credit is due to Annville 
for showing itself so favorably disposed toward the interests of an edu- 
cational institution. The people of Annville seem to realize fully the 



THE FORUM 



90 



worth of a college. Their conduct in this dire calamity evidences that 
they fully appreciate the salutary influence of institutions of learning 
upon humanity in that it lifts it up into a higher sphere of life, and the 
blessing of having one immediately in their midst. There have been 
communities, and it is a sad fact that there are yet such today, which 
look suspiciously and unfavorably upon higher schools and those who 
are engaged in them either as professors or students. Such communities 
very ignorantly and maliciously underrate the good influence which these 
schools and people bring to bear upon a community. But this is happily 
not true of Annville, which has proved itself far in advance of many 
towns in thought and action. 

* * * 

The Real significance of the things in this life depends largely 
upon the way we look at them. Viewed in one light a block of marble 
is only a mass of hard rock, from another point of view it is the prison 
of a life-like statue. A careless observer may see only a great wilderness 
before him but the sturdy pioneer sees a higher plane of civilization. 
When we look at the mass of ruins that disfigures our campus like a 
huge scar it is hard to see in it anything but the ghost of the building 
we saw for the last time before our vacation. Yet there is more in those 
gloomy ruins than we see at the first glance. When we look thought- 
fully on the solitary walls shrouded in mists and pale moonlight they 
seem to change from ghosts of what Lebanon Valley has been to prophets 
of what Greater Lebanon Valley will be in the future. Our truer vision 
shows us a picture of a group of modern structures springing up from 
the ruins of the old Administration building. While it is. true that these 
new buildings can never have the same wealth of associations for us that 
the old ones had, nevertheless we hail them as friends that will mean 
much to our college in the future. 

Our students have shown splendid college spirit in returning to 
school in spite of their personal losses and the inconvenience to which 
they are subjected in every way. Does not this fact in itself show that 
greater things are in store for Lebanon Valley College? Our recent 
misfortune has strengthened the bond of sympathy between the town 
people and the college as nothing else could have done. We have 
learned, as we never could have in any other way, how many kind hearts 
sympathize with us and how many cheerful homes open their doors to 
us. When we think of the enthusiastic support and co-operation of both 
students and town people, and of the hearty response to our plea for 



91 



THE FORUM 



funds we should see on the ruined walls bright pictures of the brilliant 
future that is in store for Greater Lebanon Valley. 

* * * 

The present number of the Forum is intended as a memorial 
number of the fire and as such we trust it will be of interest not only to 
the students but to the alumni and friends of the college as well. Most 
of the contents bears on the subject which is at present uppermost in 
the minds of all friends of the college. This interest, however, is sure 
to wane in a short time and we think it fitting that some record of this 
event should be preserved. The bright prospects for the future of 
Lebanon Valley and the busy scenes which will be daily before our eyes 
will soon blot out the memory of what was at the time considered so 
great a calamity. For the material of this number we extend our thanks 
to all who contributed. We are, however, especially indebted to Ex- 
Pres. E. Benj. Bierman and to Prof. J. E. Lehman for their articles, 
which we trust, will be of interest to all. Dr. Bierman, by reason of his 
long connection with the college and its interests and his excellent mem- 
ory, reinforced by valuable papers and documents in his possession, is 
probably the most competent living authority on the various phases of 
the past history of the college. His article will therefore be both in- 
teresting and valuable. Prof. Lehman also has been connected for many 
years with the college and is well qualified to speak on the subject which 
he presents. The cuts will also be valuable since the traces of the fire 
are fast disappearing and will soon be a thing of the past. Trusting 
that it will meet with the approval of our readers we submit this number 
to them. 

Alumni Notes. 

Mrs. A. E. Shroyer, 'oo, visited her parents over the holidays. 

H. E. Enders, '97, was a holiday visitor in town and witnessed 
the fire. 

Mrs. J. D. Stehman, '99, visited her parents in town during the 
holidays. 

John I. Shaud, '04, a student at Mt. Airy Theological Seminary, 
was home for the holidays. 

John H. Graybill, '04, a student in Union Biblical Seminary r 
Dayton, O., spent the holidays with his parents in town. 



THE FORUM 



92 



E. C. Roop, '03, is a second 3^ear student in Western Maryland 
University. 

J. Walter Esbenshade, '03, is clerking in the American Iron and 
Steel Works, Lebanon. 

Alfred Keister Mills, '04, pursuing studies at Yale visited his 
parents over the holidays. 

Dr. D. Albert Kreider, '92, Yale University, visited his parents 
over the holidays. He rendered valuable services in providing accom- 
modations for the students. 

We learn from the Yale Alumnae Weekly of recent date that Prof. 
B. H. Sneath, '81, who held the chair of Philosophy, has been appoint- 
ed, by request, to the chair of the Theory and Practice of Education. 

Miss Florence Behm, a graduate of the Art Department, '04, 
visited her parents during the holidays. She is taking a course 
at Drexel Institute, Philadelphia. She made a fine sketch of the ruins 
after the fire. 

Among the ministers who attended the meeting of East Pennsyl- 
vania Conference held in this place Jan. 5, to plan relief for the college, 
were the following: I. H. Albright, '76; J. A. Lyter, '85; E. O. Burt- 
ner, '90; S. C. Enck, '91; D. S. Eshleman, '94; H. E. Miller, '99; I E. 
Runk, '99; D. E. Long, '00; A. E. Shroyer, '00; R. R. Butterwick, '01; 
D. D. Buddinger. '02; H. F. Rhoad, '03. 

College No&es. 

The Saint Cecilia Society gave a very pleasing entertainment to 
the public on Dec. 20, 1904. 

Pres. Roop addressed the teachers of the Lebanon District 
Institute, Friday evening Jan. 13. 

Bishop Kephart gave a very interesting lecture before the student 
body in chapel, Jan. 13 on American Archaeology. 

The Y. M. C. A. met recently for re-organization, as the records 
and minutes of former years were completely destroyed by the recentrfie. 

Mr. Arthur J. Jones, manager of the basket-ball team has secured 
the town hall to be used for basket-ball. The team will begin practice 
January 25. All the games will be regularly played as scheduled with 
the exception of Schuylkill Seminary which will be played at a later date. 

The officers of the St. Cecilia Society for this term are as follows: 
Pres., I. McKenrick; Vice Pres., Miss Charlotte Fisher; Sec, Constance 
Oldham; Librarian, Laura McCormick; Treas., Katherine Gensemer; 
Chaplain, Iva Maulfair; Pianist, Isaiah Klopp; Critic, Prof. H. Oldham. 



93 



THE FORUM 



The first serious accident in connection with the "Greater Leba- 
non Valley College Movement" occurred on Wednesday, Jan. 18, when 
Mr. Harry Fink, one of those engaged in demolishing the old walls, had 
his leg broken. The wall at the south end was undermined and thrown 
down by exploding heavy charges of dynamite under it. The explosion 
threw several bricks from the wall with gieat violence and one of these 
struck Mr. Fink upon the leg, fracturing the bone. 

Among the list of delegates elected to the general conference from 
the Pennsylvania conference we notice the names of Trustees, Rev. A. 
B. Statton, W. A. Lutz, J. C. Heckert, and G. C. Snyder, and W. H, 
Washinger, S. F. Huber and Geo. Wolf who are Lebanon Valley 
alumni. From the Eastern Pennsylvania conference, Trustees, Rev. Di 
D. Lowry, Rev. H. S. Gabel, and B. H. Engle, and from the alunini, 
Rev. H. U. Roop, Rev. I. H. Albright, and D. A. Peters. 



T. B. Beatty visited his classmate, F. B. Plummer, during 
vacation. 

Miss Edith King visited Miss Ruth Hershey at Derry Church on 
her return to school. 

Park Esbenshade visited A. B. Brackbill at The Gap, Lancaster 
Co., before coming back to school. 

G.|L Rider was the guest of A. C. Crone and of Albert and Roy 
Brenneman during the Xmas holidays. 

E. E. Snyder spent a part of his vacation at Red Lion, visiting 
Messrs. Stray er, Herman and Waughtel. 

M. O. Snyder and J. Warren Kauffman were the guests of M. M. 
Hoover at Chambersburg during vacation. 

Ammon Kreider, a former member of the present Sophomore class 
visited his home in Annville over the Christmas holidays. 



Personals. 



Directory. 



Andrews 
Appenzellar 



Rented house on College Avenue. 
Home of Prof. McFadden, Sheridan Ave. 
Home of Prof. Oldham, East Main Street. 
- Home of Prof. John, College Ave. 

Home of Pres. Roop, College Ave. 
Home of Mr. Boehm, Sheridan Ave. 



Arndt 
Beatty 
Beddow 



Bender, A. 



THE FORUM 



94 



Bender, Ray 
Billow 
Brackbill 
Brenneman, Roy 
Brenneman, Albert 
Buffington - 
Clippinger 

Derrickson, Prof. S. H. 

Esbenshade 

English 

Evans 

Faus 

Gehr 

Geyer - 

Gillis 

Hambright 
Hermann 
Hodges 
Hoover 

Jackson, Prof. J. K. 

James 

Jones 

Kaufmann - 
Knauss 
Eeininger - 
Lichty 

Einebaugh - 

Eong 

Eudwig 

Mathias 

Maxwell 

McKenrick 

Metzgar 

Miller 

Owen 

Peters 

Plummer 

Rider 

Rojahn 



Shenk's Bakery, West Main Street. 

Rented house on College Ave. 
Prof. Shenk's house, Maple Street. 
Rented house on College Ave. 
Rented house on College Ave. 
Rented house on College Ave. 
Home of Harry Light, East Main Street. 
Home of Mr. A . Brightbill, College Ave. 
Home of Aaron Herr, College Ave. 
Rented House on College Ave. 
Home of Mr. Fasnacht, College Ave. 
Home of Mr. Boehm, Sheridan Ave. 

- Prof. Shenk's house, Maple Street. 
Home of Misses Heisey, East Main Street. 

- Prof. Shenk's house, Maple Street. 
Home of A. S. Kreider, East Main Street. 

Shenk's Bakery, West Main Street. 

- Home of A. Gingrich, Railroad Street. 
Home of Dr. Zimmerman, West Main Street. 

Home of Prof. Schlichter, College Ave. 

Rented house on College Ave. 
Prof. Shenk's house, Maple Street. 
Home of Prof. Spangler, East Main Street. 
Home of Prof. Oldham, East Main Street. 

Rented house on College Ave. 
Rented house on College Ave. 
Home of Prof. Spangler, East Main Street. 

- Home of David Kreider, Sheridan Ave. 

Rented house on College Ave. 
Home of Prof. Daugherty, College Ave. 

Rented house on College Ave. 
Home of Aaron Herr, College Ave. 
Home of John S. Shope, West Main Street. 

Home of Pres. Roop, College Ave. 
Home of Mr. Fasnacht, College Ave. 
Home of John S. Shope, West Main Street. 

Home of Prof. John, College Ave. 
Home of Harry Eight, East Main Street. 
Home of Prof. Daugherty, College Ave. 



95 

Seitz 

Senger 

Shaner 

Shenk, Cyrus E. 

Showers 

Smith 

Snyder, M. O. 

Snyder, Stanley 

Snyder, E. E. 

Spessard, Prof. H. E. 

Spessard, A. R. 

Stanton 

Strayer 

Waltz 

Waughtel 

Wolf 



THE FORUM 

- Home of A. Gingrich, Railroad Street. 
Home of Prof. Schlichter, College Ave. 

Rented house on College Ave. 
Home of Mr. A. Brightbill, College Ave. 

Prof. Shenk's house, Maple Street. 
Home of Misses Heisey, East Main Street. 
Home of Dr. Zimmerman, West Main Street. 
Home of A. S. Kreider, East Main Street. 
Home of Mr. Bibighous, Railroad Street. 

Rented house on College Ave. 
Rented house on College Ave. 
Home of Prof. McFadden, Sheridan Ave. 
Home of Mr. Bibighous, Railroad Street. 
Home of David Kreider, Sheridan Ave. 
Prof. Shenk's house, Maple Street. 
Rented house on College Ave. 

Exchange Notes. 

The Milton College Review appeared among our exchanges for 
the first time this month. The first hurried glance showed that the 
paper was superior to a great many college papers in the fineness of its 
cuts. 

Two of our exchanges this month, the "College Folio" and the 
"Muhlenberg" appear with an even space between the paragraphs. It 
does not seem very clear whether it is the purpose to make the pages 
look artistic or whether it is for the same purpose that we are all advised 
to use short paragraphs instead of long ones so as to make our articles 
look entertaining. Whatever the purpose, the appearance of the page 
makes one feel as if the paper were made up of a number of short articles 
grouped under different heads. 

The December "Otterbein Aegis" was truly a football number. 
It began with a picture of the entire squad and ended with the center's 
picture. When a paper announces that there is to be a football number, 
let that number be full of football and nothing else. 

The article on "Who is America's Greatest Poet I^aelius,?" by 
whoever he may be, surely not Scipio's friend, in the Mercury is worthy 
of mention. It is, however, a question which only the test of time will 
settle. 

The Albright Bulletin has come back again, its reappearances are 
somewhat similar to the traditional bad peany, only in this case we are 
always glad to see it. 



THE FORUM 



Messrs. Stanton and Ellis were rec ently elected members of the 
Kalozetean Literary Society. 



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TJhe College 'Department 

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groups bear the names of the leading subjects included in them. They are : the 

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Covers the work of the STANDARD High and Normal Schools and Academies 
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FEBRUARY, 1905 




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THE FORUM. 



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THE FORUM. 



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Contents 



The United States In The Texas Revolution 96 

Youth's Greatest Problem - - 103 

The National Cash Register - - -107 

Editorial - - - - . m 

College Notes - - - - -114 

Juniors Banquet the Seniors - - 116 

Glee Club Concert - - -117 

Germaine - - - . Hf 

Valentin? Party - - . -117 

Programs - - . . n f 

Corner Stone - Hg 

Reception - - . . ng 

Society Notes - - . -118 

Science - ng 

Junior Annual - . . -119 

Exchange Notes - . . . xi9 



Volume XV1SL FEBRUARY, 190 5 Number 5 

The United States In The Texas Revolution. 

At what precise date the Anglo- Americans entered the territory 
embraced within the confines of the present State of Texas, we have no 
accurate record; but it was sometime during the latter part of the 
eighteenth century. In the year 1799 Nolan's expedition, evidently 
intended to win Texas by conquest, was begun. It failed disastrously, 
as did also the filibustering expedition of the Mexican refugee, Guiterrez, 
assisted by Lieut. Magee of the United States army. In 1819 James 
Long of Natchez led a band of immigrants into Texas. They declared 
themselves independent of Texas and Mexico at Nacodoches in June of 
that year. This movement also ended in failure, and in 1821, when 
Mexico won her independence from Spain there was in Texas only a 
handful of American squatters who had filtered in from The Neutral 
Ground. 

Before this time the United States Government had kept its 
watchful eye on the territory beyond the Sabine. When Louisiana was 
purchased from France in 1803, the boundaries were declared to be 
those described in the secret treaty of San Ildefonso by which the French 
had acquired the territory from Spain. But these boundaries were in- 
definite enough to enable the United States to lay claim to part, if not 
the whole, of what is now Texas, and she took every advantage of the 
opportunity thus offered. A clash of arms between the Spanish and the 
American forces seemed at one time inevitable, when an armistice was 
agreed upon ( 1 S06) by which both parties agreed not to colonize the 
"Neutral Ground" until the decision of the question in dispute. This 
territory became the abode of the lawless element of both nations until 
the Sabine was declared the boundary in 1819. 

John Quincy'Adams, who as Secretary of State negotiated the 
Treaty of 1819011 the part of the United States, has been accused of 
having surrendered the claim to Texas in order to prevent the spread of 
slavery in the Southwest. This charge can not be substantiated, for 
later, as President, [he instructed Secretary Henry Clay to negotiate for 
the purchase of Texas; or, as Clay put it, the "re-transfer of Texas." 



97 THE FORUM 

Notwithstanding the boundary provision of the treaty of 1819 
many Americans believed that their Government had given away m this 
treaty what really belonged to them. The filibustering expeditions of 
Americans in Texas, and the persistent claims of the Government and 
people of the United States to part or all of what is now Texas had the 
effect of prejudicing the Mexicans in the future against the colonizations 
of Anglo-Americans. 

After the year 1 82 1 emigrants from the United States began to 
move into Texas, taking advantage of the liberal inducements offered 
the empresario. After Stephen Austin had secured the land offer given 
bv the Mexican Government to his father, Moses Austin, there was a 
g'radual movement to Texas, but by no means a rush. A majority of 
these settlers became law-abiding citizens of Mexico and intended to re- 
main such. As already stated, on March 26, 1825, Secretary Henry 
Clay gave special instructions to Minister Poinsett to procure from 
Mexico the "re-transfer of Texas." This came to naught, but the 
instructions were repeated March 15, 1827, a few months after the 
Fredonian uprising. The time of this proposal was thus unfortunate 
for while it bore no causal relation to the uprising, the Mexicans could 
scarcely fail to see the portentious significance of these two attempts on 
the part of Anglo-Americans to secure the separation of Texas from 
Mexico. 

In addition to the negotiations from time to time for the purchase 
of Texas, and partly bound up with it, was the attempt to negotiate a 
treaty of amity and commerce and a treaty of limits. These negotiations 
were frequently delayed, apparently by both sides. The treaty of limits 
had reference to a final settlement of the boundary between Louisiana 
and Texas. Soon after the Treaty of 18 19 the boundary was to have 
been run by commissioners representing both countries. But delay after 
delay took place, being partly due, as was the case with all diplomatic 
relations of this period, to an unstable Mexican Government, lne 
failure to settle the question of a boundary between the two countries 
was very irritating to the people on the borders of Arkansas Territory 
as is evidenced by the following taken from Niles Register under date or 
December 14, 1830: "Gov. Pope, of Arkansas, says, 'Col. Milam, a 
grantee of lands from the Mexican Government, persists in his purpose 
to survey those lands. This is inimical to the interests of the United 
States, because the boundary has not yet been agreed upon. Before 




THE FORUM 98 

this date Secretary Van Buren had instructed Gov. Pope to maintain the 
jurisdiction of Arkansas to the doubtful territory, but not to use force 
without consulting the authorities." 

A reason frequently given by the Mexican Minister to the United 
States for not being able to conclude the pending treaties was the hostile 
articles m certain newspapers of the United States, together with reports 
to the effect that United States troops were mobilizing on the frontier of 
Texas. The following correspondence illustrates this point: May 21, 
1828, Minister Poinsett says: "The Treaty of Amity and Commerce 
was rejected. The public mind is inflamed by an article appearing in 
the American Quarterly Review." Again, July 22, 1829, in a letter to 
Van Buren, Poinsett says: "Just at the time when the treaty was laid 
before the Mexican Chamber of Deputies the public mind had been 
irritated by some unjustly severe strictures on their national character, 
published in the United States, and industriously circulated in this 
country by the party so hostile to us. ' ' He also speaks of ' 'the absurd 
attempt of Hunter and his misguided companions to create a revolution" 
as having caused a change in Mexican policy toward the Treaty of 
Amity and Commerce and the Treaty of Limits. 

The Mexican authorities complained repeatedly of the organ- 
ization of troops on the frontier. On the 31st of July, 1829, Poinsett 
denies "that in various parts of the United States which border on this 
country, provisions are storing, troops collecting, and the militia training 
even on festivals," the Mexicans fearing that the United States might 
assist Spain in her contemplated attack upon Mexico. Notwithstanding 
the denial of Poinsett, Bocanegra writes, August 20, 1829, "The under- 
signed Secretary of State and of the Department of Interior and Exterior 
Relations has the honor to inform your Excellency that other official 
communications have been received from our frontier stations which 
s peak more positively and specifically about this affair, announcing that 
there exists already an assemblage of North American troops upon the 
Mexican territory on the frontiers of Coahuila and Texas."* 

To this Poinsett replied, denying the charge on the ground that 
Such an army could not under the Constitution of the United States be 
raised except by Congress, and Congress "is not now in session." 

How much truth there was in the charges of Bocanegra, it is 
di fficult to say. How ever, Poinsett's reply was absurd. The Mexican 

*Texas never was a State of Mexico as many American Historians would lead us tc 
believe. It was a department of the State of Coahuila and Texas. 



99 THE FORUM 

Government hardly supposed that the mobilizing of armed troops on the 
frontier was legal. They may have had reference to a company of armed 
citizens who organized to accompany traders to Santa Fe. This action 
(the organization of citizens to accompany the traders) is severely criti- 
cized by the editor of Niles' Register. 

As if further to irritate the Mexicans, the North American news- 
papers preached annexation. Thus the Richmond Enquirer of Sept., 
1829, speaks favorably of annexation. "The invasion of that Republic," 
it says, "has attracted the attention of Great Britain. Will the United 
States be less alert? The distracted condition affords an opportunity." 
Papers in Nashville speak in the same vein. 

A London paper ot this time says that a letter from Mexico dis- 
closes a very curious negotiation between that Government and the 
Government of the United States. The United States promises to ad- 
vance money for Mexico, if the Spanish should invade Mexico, Texas 
and Lower' California to be given as security. The "John Bull" 
referring to this says: "The proposition of America must not be 
quietlv listened to, or tamely permitted. While we are in earnest in our 
endeavors to put a stop to the power of Russia, we must not forget the 
necessity of checking the aggrandizement of America; and we repeat, we 
can conceive no ground more strong for co-operating with Spain in the 
present struggle than that of stopping the union of Northern and South- 
ern America which must be the inevitable result of the scheme now 
negotiated by the Cabinet of the United States." 

The English and French ministers were hostile to the United 
States and were very influential in prejudicing the Mexican mind against 
Poinsett, who had troubles enough. He was accused of sympathizing 
with the Republican party in Mexico, and of introducing a new Ma- 
sonic rite. The aristocratic party was bitterly opposed to him on this 
account. That the Republicans of Mexico looked upon the representa- 
tive of the United States as a sort of confidential adviser was natural, for 
the United States above all other nations had given moral and physical 
support to their cause in the contest against Spain and the Mexican 
Empire. Poinsett thus secured the enmity of the Spanish party,— the 
aristocrats and the clergy. 

England's attitude added to his difficulties, for the London Times 
of Dec. 14, 1829 criticizes Poinsett for taking advantage of his knowledge 
of internal feuds in Mexico to promote the annexation of Texas scheme. 




THE FORUM 100 

Niles' Register says apropos of this that there are sundry reports of 
attempts to assassinate Poinsett. We shall not attribute them to the 
British party in Mexico but from the tenor of the Times article, a 
suspicion of it may be indulged. 

Mr. Poinsett was finally recalled at the request of the Mexican 
Government. When he left Mexico the Mexican Gazette "El Sol," 
official, bad this to say in its issue of Jan. 5. "On Sunday the famous 
Mr. Poinsett left Mexico after having fulfilled his mission wonderfully 
well. This remarkable founder of Yorkism, on flying from amongst us 
was accompanied by millions of curses, and by the deputy Cerecero, who 
will remain without his lord and best friend." 

The repeated attempt of the United States to purchase Texas, 
together with the persistent claims of the government to part of Texas; 
the friendly relations between Poinsett and the Republicans of Mexico, 
the watchfulness of Governor Polk of Arkansas and his letter favoring 
annexation, the repeated statements in American newspapers show ing 
hostility to Mexico and their almost unanimous sentiment favorable to 
annexation in the Southern United States undoubtedly induced the Mex- 
ican authorities to pass the anti-colonization laws and anti-slavery laws. 
There seems to be a direct relation between these facts and The Stamp 
Act of the Texas Revolution— the Decree of April 6, 1834. 

Poinsett was succeeded in 1830 by Anthony Butler who had had 
no diplomatic experience and who boasted that he would settle every- 
thing to the satisfaction of the President in six mouths No sooner had 
he arrived in Mexico than "El Sol" said: "A few days before the de- 
parture of Mr. Poinsett from this capital, the American, Mr. Butler, 
arrived here, commissioned it is said* * * * to negotiate with our 
government for the cession of Texas for the sum of $5,000,000." This 
was before Butler had presented the matter to the Mexican government. 
Butler soon found that his task was a difficult one, and a man less quali- 
fied than himself it would perhaps have been difficult to find. Yet he 
was continually boasting to the United States Secretary of State that he 
would soon accomplish something. 

The instructions given Col. Butler were to observe a strict neu- 
trality, assure the Mexican government of our friendly attitude, con- 
clude the pending treaties and purchase Texas, and keep aloot from the 
factional quarrels of the Mexicans. 

President Jackson at this time was very anxious that the purchase 
of Texas should be accomplished. May 21, 1831 Butler wrote to Jack- 




IOI 



THE FORUM 



son as follows: "The subject of Texas about^which you express so much 
anxiety, I have never for a moment lost sight of. For in addition to 
what I knew to be your wishes on that subject, I could not be insensible 
to the great advantage our country would derive from the acquisition, 
and my opinion communicated very freely on the subject both to your- 
self and Mr. Van Buren in the summer of 1829 when in Washington 
city abundantly establishes the fact." Butler's correspondence generally 
discloses the anxiety of the United States Government regarding affairs 
in Texas. 

On the 9th of March, 1830, Butler wrote to Van Buren as follows: 
"From the enclosed document you will perceive what are the views of 
the Mexican Secretary of State in relation to Texas and the plans he 
suggests for securing the possession of that province to Mexico. Had 
his project been adopted as recommeded, I am confident that a revolution 
in that province would have followed, and Texas became ours by a 
movement among the people themselves without costing the government 
of the United States a dollar, but the modifications of the plan suggested 
on the part of Congress will leave the population of Texas little to com- 
plain of and tranquility may, therefore, continue for a year or longer. 
* * * * Notwithstanding all this, I have the best grounds for be- 
lieving that Texas may be had by treaty, etc." 

The report ot Secretary Alaman to which Mr. Butler refers takes 
up at length the conditions of Texas and the present dangers. The fol- 
lowing points are emphasized by him : 

1. A most important subject and one that demands immediate 
attention is the danger that threatens the department of Texas in the 
State of Coahuila and Texas. 

2. It is coterminous with the United States of the North and 
they now show that they want it. 

3. What has been their policy ? In 50 years without arresting 
public attention they have become master of extensive European colonies. 

4. They intrude themselves into the country they covet, with or 
without the consent of the government of those countries. 

5. Put forward ridiculous historical pretenses for their acts. 

6. In case of European colonies acquired by the United States, 
the colonies were secondary. Texas is of prime importance to us. 

7. They do not obey laws. Texas already practically belongs to 
the United States and will entirely in a short time if we continue our 
present policy. 



THE FORUM 102 

8. We are indebted to Gen. Teran for information without 
which Texas would be lost to us. 

9. Not one of these immigrants is a Catholic although the neces- 
sary papers were signed. 

10. Large colonies have been established without our knowledge 
.and the importation of slaves does not cease. 

11. They claim the territory to the Rio Bravo. 

12. The treaty of Limits has not been executed by the United 

States. 

13. The new Minister comes with an offer of $5,000,000 for 

Texas. 

Remedies : 

1. Military force must be sent there. 

2. Must colonize Texas with Mexicans. Send men sentenced to 
the galleys there. 

3. Colonize with individuals of other nations whose interests, 
customs and language differ from those of North Americans. 

4. Encourage the coastwise trade. 

5. Apply with regard to Texas, the power granted by the law of 
the 1 8th of August, 1824, and make that department dependent upon 
the General Government in matters of colonization. 

6. Take a census of Texas finding legal and illegal residents. 
Government must now occupy Texas or lose it forever. If the law 
against slavery were enforced the loss of Texas would be certain. 

If one cannot subscribe to all the statements of the Mexican Sec- 
retary, he cannot fail to admire his ability to foresee the ultimate out- 
come of the relations between Texas and the United States. Alaman's 
report shows the effect upon the mind of an intelligent Mexican of the 
movement in the United States and Texas. Although these radical pro- 
posals were rejected as Col. Butler said, yet they were substantially in 
in the policy of Santa Anna five years later when it was too late. 

To Be Continued in Next Number. 



103 THE FORUM 

Youth's Greatest Problem. 

It is quite natural for the individual in this age of physical, men- 
tal, and spiritual activity, to consider his lot in life the hardest and the 
duties of his vocation the most difficult to perform satisfactorily and 
successfully. This is only the outgrowth of an inherent tendency for 
one to be inclined toward pessimism when considering conditions and 
affairs in his own life and when thinking that fate has probably not 
given him the same degree of success that it has given his more fortu- 
nate, or rather, lucky brother. 

The common day laborer complains because he has to work more 
than a certain number of hours per day and receive such poor compensa- 
tion for his services; this is also the general complaint of clerks, appren- 
tices, and even skilled mechanics; the business man complains because of 
close competition and trouble with labor unions; the doctor complains 
because he is too often awakened from peaceful slumbers by people who 
are never in a hurry to pay their bills; the young lawyer complains be- 
cause he does not have a larger practice and the old lawyer is disappoint- 
ed because the public hasn't recognized his services and bestowed great- 
er political honors upon him; the preacher often complains because 
his parishioners do not attend services regularly and contribute more 
freely to religious enterprises and charitable institutions; the teacher 
complains because the duties of his profession allow scarcely any change 
in his routine of work; and even the diligent student grows weary of the 
innumerable tasks imposed upon him and complains because he thinks 
more is expected from him than he is in any way able to accomplish. 

Whether or not there is any psychological basis for such pessi- 
mism, let philosophers determine, but surely pessimistic views concerning 
one's occupation or vocation are generally not the product of thought 
during the best moments of life. They have their origin in the problems 
of life, without which neither pessimism nor optimism could exist. 
The great struggles for existence and supremacy constitute the nucleus 
of many of the problems confronting practical men today. Each voca- 
tion has its problems to be solved, enemies that must be placed under 
control. 

The aged financier, the experienced farmer, the teacher or 
preacher who has for decades been a valuable counsellor to his fellow- 
men-each individual whether old, young, or middle aged, thinks he is 
now living in the supremest moments of his life when each battle he 



THE FORUM 



104 



fights is the most stubborn and each victory won the hardest earned. 
The mature mind very seldom if ever gives the young man or young 
woman the credit they deserve and the honor they merit for conflicts 
won in the arena of life, for the hardest task of the youth is merely 
sport for old age, the most difficult theorem for the beginner is but an 
axiom for the one skilled in the science of modern ethics. 

If it is a pleasure for the old gladiator who has finished his fight 
to stand back and laugh at a young hero just about to begin his combat 
for life or death, let him do so, but let him remember that when the con- 
flict wages fiercest he must rely on the strength of youth for sustenance, 
and protection to his body long since enfeebled by age. If the adage is 
true that "a task well begun is half done," then we who are students 
have greater problems confronting us than those who are already settled 
in life, for now is the time when we must decide what our life's work is 
to be; we are now in the formative period of our lives and have not yet 
made a beginning, much less a good beginning in the battle that we must 
wage while life's strength lasts. 

The largest religious congregations today do not want ministers 
who have only college training; invariably they ask for seminary or 
university men, who are the best qualified to render them the service 
they need. The "bench" and the "bar" do not ask for judges and 
lawyers who do not have a knowledge of jurisprudence as the basis of 
their knowledge of civil and criminal laws. No profession calls for men 
who are not willing to learn as much as it is possible to know concerning 
the nature and duties of that profession. 

There are then two great problems confronting the majority of 
youths and especially college students who are taking courses such as 
are offered in our own college. First, what shall my vocation in life be, 
or what profession shall I chose? Second, how shall I as a self-relying 
student acquire the knowledge necessary to overcome all obstacles in the 
pathway through which the chosen profession leads me so that I at the 
end of my journey shall receive the "well done" from my Master? The 
first I consider the greater of the two problems, and indeed the greatest 
of all problems the student must solve; the intensity of the former does 
not exceed that of the latter but its scope is much larger for it includes 
every youth while the latter includes only those students who are self- 
dependent financially. 



io5 



THE FORUM 



There are five things that must enter into the choice of a vocation, 
namely, accident, opportunity, parents' preference, the impression of 
associates, and the individual's choice, the first of which does not need 
immediate consideration for over providential interferences we have no 
control. It is hardly necessary to explain what is meant by any of these, 
but there is an apparent well-grounded reason for including each one. 
If a youth has decided to become a skilled mechanic and after several 
years of apprenticeship has his arms severed from his body through some 
accident it will be necessary for him to cultivate another talent so as to 
become useful to his fellow men regardless of his misfortune; if per- 
chance, the same youth were the son of a poor farmer he may have be- 
come reconciled to the fact that his life must be spent at hard labor on 
the farm, when unexpectedly through an unknown inheritance, opportu- 
nity, if he only grasp it, will allow him to become a lawyer or minister and 
thereby gratify an earlier desire. 

It is not the nature of the thrifty American to stand idle and 
longingly yearn for some opportunity to present itself, whereby he may 
ascend to fame and riches, but in early life he must begin seeking, mak- 
ing, and grasping opportunities. To what extent the impression of 
associates and the preference of parents should influence the individual 
in choosing a vocation is an open question; neither is it of the most vital 
importance, both should be carefully considered. The parent is very 
often blinded by prejudice, tradition, and custom and therefore cannot 
choose from an impartial standpoint; furthermore if a youth of good 
moral character becomes associated with fellows of similar characters 
they are too apt to magnify his virtues and talents and lose sight of his 
physical and intellectual weaknesses, and if he ally himself with the 
reckless and unconcerned it is very certain that they will not choose for 
him a high and noble calling. On the other hand the advice of experi- 
enced parents and the counsel of esteemed associates may not be as 
oases in the desert, but rather bright stars guiding to the fountain of 
usefulness. 

The uneducated youth must rely upon one or more of the four 
things already mentioned to determine what place in life he shall fill, 
but the one who has a marked degree of culture is free to consider 
judiciously another element, namely, personal choice or preference de- 
termined by natural talents or qualifications. I refer here, again to the 
college student and especially the upper class man. Most of our colleges 



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and universities first emphasize extensity in study and then intensity, 
and will not give diplomas to men and women who have not proved 
themselves worthy at least to a small degree. 

In the small college there are very few either male or female, who 
in the three or four years of final preparation for life's duties have not 
had thrust upon them one or more positions carrying with them com- 
paratively large degrees of responsibility. They have always been relied 
upon to use their best judgment whether they have been in the cabinets 
of the Christian Associations or upon their most important committees, 
whether they have been identified with one phase of athletics or another, 
whether they have been in the executive councils of their fraternity or 
society, or occupied advisory positions in their class, and they have not 
been unmindful of the criticism of those competent to judge their labors. 
The past reveals to us the fact that the youth has been relied upon for 
strength in war and counsel in peace, the present is repeating history 
and proving that fact. 

Let the youth then not be denied the privilege of choosing his 
own vocation. Let us judiciously consider the will of our associates, the 
preference of our parents, our talents and our opportunities and after 
choosing our vocation or profession, having been properly trained for 
life's great race ; let us run not in the race where only we receive the 
prize, but toward the great goal where we shall receive a crown of 
eternal life as the signal of victory. 

Frkd'k Berry Plummer, '05. 



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The National Cash Register. 

The first man to conceive the idea of a cash register was one, 
James Richey, a prominent business man of a southern Ohio town. In 
1879 while on his way to Europe, he became interested in the workings 
of the steam gauge which controlled the engines of the ship. He 
thought that if he could invent a machine which would register the 
amount of money taken into his store each day he could not only save 
time and labor but also detect any dishonesty among his clerks. 

Richey shortened his stay in Europe in order that he might hasten 
home and work upon this new invention. The first cash register some- 
what resembled a clock and, although much time and money were spent 
in endeavoring to perfect it, the inventor soon saw that this form of a 
register was impracticable. In 1882 Richey was still working upon his 
machine, but becoming discouraged because of his want of capital, he 
sold his patents to a firm known as "The National Manufacturing 
Company." 

At this time John and James Patterson were running a general 
store at Coalton, Ohio, in connection with their mining ventures in that 
section. The Patterson Brothers were selling a vast amount of goods 
and should have made money, but evidently there was dishonesty some- 
where. The profits fell far short of expectation. One set of clerks was 
in vain exchanged for another. At last John Patterson heard of the 
National Manufacturing Company and at once ordered two cash registers 
by telegraph. As soon as the new machines were installed the profits of 
the firm began to increase until prosperity suggested new ventures. 
Thinking that money could be made in the manufacture of machines 
that were so advantageous to business men, the Pattersons bought the 
controlling interest in the National Manufacturing Company. 

At this time the factory was located in an old building in the 
heart of Dayton. The entire force of mechanics numbered only fifty, 
while John Patterson, the president of the company, and James Patter- 
son, the vice president, and several clerks, constituted the office force. 
In introducing cash registers upon the market the company had to 
overcome two difficulties. They had to create a demand for an article 
which few desired to purchase and they had to overcome the prejudices 
of clerks who looked upon the registers as thief -catchers. 

But the business was managed so skilfully that the company soon 
found their quarters too small and one story was added to the original 



THE FORUM I0 8 

plant. In 1888 a new addition again became necessary and in looking 
about for a building site the old Patterson homestead about four miles 
south of Dayton was selected. Here a large and commodious building 
was erected. In 1890 a further addition was made and today the 
factory consists of nine large buildings representing about 140 acres of 
floor space. 

The factory owns and operates its own brass foundry which is 
of interest to every visitor. It is provided with every known device for 
insuring the comfort and health of employees. A system of sewers and 
ventilating pipes frees the interior from the smoke which is invariably 
found in like plants, making the atmosphere pure and wholesome. 

The company has a model power plant which attracts attention if 
only because of its 175 foot chimney. The force represented is equal to 
3,345 horse power and operates seven generators which supplv electricity 
for 10,000 incandescent and 257 arc lights scattered throughout the 
plant— light enough for a city of 25,000 inhabitants. 

Protection against fire is secured by a private fire company, regu- 
larly drilled and supplied with fire stations throughout the building. 
At regular practice a steady stream is frequently thrown 180 feet. 

When one approaches the factory his first impression is that he 
sees before him an ancient fort or castle. The buildings are constructed 
so as to allow a free ventilation— standing far apart and giving space for 
a large grass plot. A visitor enters the plant by a large doorway and 
finds himself in a capacious room— the library and historical hall. Here 
one can see all the different models of cash registers from the first to the 
last, also many registers which have been secured from other companies 
when they were forced to quit business either by the fierce competition 
which the National offered or by the purchase of their entire stock in 
trade. In this room are also seen many historic relics :— the first desk 
used by President Patterson in the early days of the factory and 
numerous specimens of the flora and fauna of the different countries in 
which cash registers are sold. Here also is located the factory library 
which employees may use at the nominal fee of one cent per day for each 
book used. The entire furniture of the room is of dark weathered oak 
of Mission design while the architecture is similar to that employed in 
the Tabard Inn Library. 

Guides are ready to escort visitors through the factory and explain 
in detail everything of interest which is seen on the trip. One of the 
most noticeable things about the factory is the cleanliness. This is 



io 9 THE FORUM 

maintained by a force of white-garbed janitors who are constantly at 
work. Each building is supplied with two or three elevators for the use 
both of visitors and employees. Access from one building to another is 
secured by bridges or tunnels so that the entire trip through the factory 
is made within doors. Numerous other time and labor saving devices 
are used. A private telephone exchange serves the 145 phones used in 
the different parts of the factory while a force of uniformed messengers 
is constantly on duty. 

The travelling force of the Company consists of 800 salesman 
while 201 stores are operated throughout the world. From Norway to 
Australia and from Asia to America cash registers are sold and operated- 
In addition the company owns several large branch factories one of 
which rivals the main plant in size and importance. 

Before an agent is sent on the road to sell cash registers he is 
given a thorough course of six months in the company's "Traveling 
Salemen's Training School." Here he is taught the most approved 
methods of business and is thoroughly instructed in the manufacture 
and working of a register. 

President Patterson has often said that he does not wish to make 
money but to found a model factory where right understanding is secured 
between employer and employee, where the working man may not put 
forth his best efforts in vain. For this reason many innovations have 
been introduced in factory work. In place of the old factory stool which 
was so injurious to the user's health, the factory girls have comfortable 
chairs. Instead of the palefaced and wretched looking factory girl 
whom one can find in almost any shop, the N. C. R. women are found 
to be educated, intelligent, and coming from the best homes in ^ Dayton. 
Meals are furnished employees at a very low rate while gymnasiums are 
placed at their disposal at odd hours. Rest rooms are provided for all 
who may feel indisposed and a physician and two trained nurses are 
always in readiness to aid any who may be injured. Cooking, dancing, 
manual training, and business schools are conducted for employees, 
while prizes are offered to their children who care to participate in the 
annual horticultural contests. 

Another way in which the company secures the good will of their 
employees is by their suggestion system. Everywhere throughout the 
different buildings are files upon which employees can make either com- 
plaints or suggestions. If a man thinks that a certain thing may be 
done for the good of the factory he can make his suggestion and if the 



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executive committee of the company thinks it advisable it is accepted 
and the donor rewarded. Prizes sometimes amount to $50 and many 
employees are annually recipients of rewards. In 1904 about $14,000 
were thus distributed and this year President Patterson has ordered the 
amount to be increased. 

The wages paid by the company to its employees equal in some 
instances the salaries of professional men. Five dollars a week is the 
lowest amount paid any employee while many men make as high as $10 
a day. Consequently many men of intellectual ability are attracted to 
the factory by the money which they are able to earn. The factory 
force, as a result, is far above the employees of other firms and numbers 
in its ranks some of the most respected men of the city. 

At the suggestion of President Patterson a "Men's Welfare 
League" has recently been organized for the purpose of furthering civic 
interests and the city itself has been materially benefited by this organi- 
zation. The League believes that the time has come for less preaching 
and more practice by residents of the city concerning public evils. 
Love, charity, and common sense are its actuating motives. 

The N. C. R. is, in short, an institution where the long contested 
differences between master and man have at length been settled. It 
stands as a model for all men who desire to settle the great social 
question — shall the capitalist or laborer rule, shall we have an oligarchy 
or anarchy, shall money or brute strength prevail? President Patterson 
says neither shall be supreme but both shall be equal. Some of the 
world's most distinguished men have pronounced the N. C. R. the per- 
fect solution of this great problem. 

V. S. '08. 



in THE FORUM 

THE FORUM. 



Vol. XVIII. FEBRUARY, 1905 No. 5 



Editor-in-Chief, 

P. E. MATH I AS, '05. 

Associate Editors, 

ALICE CROWELL, '05 RAY G. LIGHT, '06 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS : 
ETHEL MYERS, '07 JOHN C. RUPP, '06 

MERLE M. HOOVER, '06 EDWARD E. KNAUSS, '07 

Business Managers : 

J. WARREN KAUFMANN, '06, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 

C. E. SHENK, '06 MAX F. LEHMAN, '07 

The Forum is published each month during the college year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

TERMS :— Subscription Price, 50 cents a Year. Single Copy, 10 cents. 

All business matter should be addressed to The Forum, Atinville, Pa. ; all literary matter to 
P. E. Mathias, Annville, Pa. 

Once a subscriber, always a subscriber, until notice for discontinuance, accompanied with all 
arrearages, has been received. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second-class mail matter. 



Editorial. 

New Organizations in a college always add greatly to its life 
and spirit. Those who are directly connected with the organization, 
have, of course, the greatest interest in it but the whole student body is 
affected in some measure by this new organic unit. Often its influence 
does not end here but is exerted in such a way as to reach those who are 
in no way connected with the institution and to arouse their interest in it. 
Whatever else our Glee Club will do it is evident that it will be one of 
the best advertisements the College could have. The crowded house 
which the Glee Club had at its first appearance in the college auditorium 
attests to the fact that people are always anxious to be entertained in a 
lively and interesting manner. Many people who have no perso nal 
interest whatever in our college will come to hear our Glee Club. They 
will be likely after that to associate the name of our college, at least 
with their evening's entertainment. Since the Glee Club will represent 
thecollege in a number of different cities and towns it will be a mo st 



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112 



effective means of making our institution known throughout this State 
and neighboring ones. It is an organization which we have -long felt 
the need of and naturally every student feels proud of the fact that Leb- 
anon Valley College has this year a Glee Club that will do its very best 
in all its engagements. The boys gave us a very good entertainment 
and we wish them great success in their future work. 

* * * 

It has been observed that many of our students do not belong 
to any of the organizations at college. Such students miss much that is 
to be obtained from college life; much of the training and development 
they might get if they belonged to an organization such as a literary 
society. All of us must sooner or later enter practical life and therefore 
should equip ourselves as thoroughly as possible for the difficulties and 
problems that we must necessarily encounter. A student cannot expect 
to get out of a college course a specific remedy for every particular evil 
which he will meet. But he can so prepare and train himself upon 
general principles that he is able to combat every obstacle that impedes 
his progress in practical life. It has been said that "knowledge is 
power." But acquired knowledge only, will not make a man successful, 
though that is the first essential. It is applied knowledge that advances. 
Only to such an extent as a man is able to make his knowledge useful 
and beneficial, will his life be worth living. To do this it is necessary 
that one utilize all the means that will aid him in securing mastery over 
his own powers. One should be able, when he is under public scrutiny, 
to speak and act with perfect coolness and self-control; to do what he 
really wishes to do and not at the critical moment when all the public is 
gazing at him, to become embarrassed and do the things that he would 
not do under more favorable circumstances. It is necessary that one 
should become thoroughly accustomed to thinking and acting before 
people. There is no phase of activity connected with any college that 
helps one to acquire this self mastery so much as a literary society. It 
means a great deal to be able to appear before an audience and perform a 
number without becoming disconcerted. A literary society offers that 
advantage. There, by constant practice, one can acquire the power of 
coming before people and speaking all he knows. There he can get rid 
of the embarrassment which prevents him from doing all he can do. 
And this is just the kind of training that one needs in life. All students 
should avail themselves of the advantages that a literary society offers 



"3 



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while they are at college. It should not be thought by any one that 
when he joins a society he becomes a part of a political organization and 
incurs the enmity of the other society. He may join for purely selfish 
reasons: for his own personal benefit. If a literary society confers no 
benefits upon its members it is not worth its own name. The political 
side of a literary society should receive no consideration. 

* * * 

In By-gonk years the higher institutions of learning, especially 
in Europe, were noted as centers of vice and dissolute living. Awful 
stories of student excesses have come down to us and that side of school 
life has been made prominent. Students are sometimes looked upon as 
a class of people who live in an entirely different ethical sphere from 
other mortals. While it is true that college life is yet not all that it 
should be from a moral standpoint, it is nevertheless true that there has 
been a very great improvement in recent years. Today, those who look 
for the speedy evangelization of the world, are seeking the men and 
women for this work in the colleges. The college man or woman is now 
expected to be a positive moral uplifting force in the community where 
they may cast their lot for life. If a college man makes a failure of his 
life he is justly censured more than his less fortunate fellows under the 
same circumstances. Today there is a strong, positive, religious element 
in nearly all the higher institutions of learning and some of the most 
noted religious leaders of the day are college men and largely developed 
their religious characters at these institutions. The religious forces of 
the college are thoroughly organized and systematic work is studied and 
carried on along various religious lines. Many forces have contributed 
to bring about the present moral conditions in college life but we think 
that the College Christian Associations may justly be given the first 
place, for many other lines of activity such as mission study, Bible 
study, volunteer bauds, devotional meetings, and the great "Student 
Summer Conference" at Northfield, as well as the "Silver Bay Confer- 
ence' ' for the ladies, are directly kept up by the Christian Associations. 
One of the aggressive movements of the Y. M. C. A. is the week of 
special services for students. This year Lebanon Valley was especially 
fortunate in having with us on February 15-17, Mr. S. M. Sayford, of 
Boston, who is an evangelist of the highest type. His helpful addresses 
and strong personality prove him to be one of the most effective religious 
workers who have ever come to Lebanon Valley. His talks aim not 




THE FORUM 114 

only at the conversion of the unsaved but at the correction and deepen- 
ing of the spiritual life of the professed Christians. By his searching 
yet tactful addresses he has awakened the Christian students to the true 
meanin-f of their professions and has awakened desires to lead more 
pure and upright lives. His messages are not sensational and are based 
on pure gospel truths. We trust that the influence of his visit here may 
have a permanent effect on the religious life of the college and may 
cause the suppression of the things that debauch student life. As he 
goes from our midst we extend to him our thanks for his services here 
and our hearty good wishes for his success elsewhere. 



College Notes. 

Hon. E. Benj. Bierman read a paper entitled, "The First Twenty- 
five years of Lebanon Valley College," before the Lebanon County 
Historical Society Feb. 17th. 

During the first week in February President Roop was in Western 
Pennsylvania and upon his return went to New York City, both trips 
being taken in the financial interests of the college. 

On Saturday evening Feb. 4, Prof, and Mrs. John and Prof, and 
Mrs. McFadden entertained the lady boarding students at the home of 
Prof, and Mrs. John, where a most enjoyable evening was spent. 

The new library building is rapidly nearing completion. Since 
the windows have been put in considerable work in the interior has been 
carried on. The second story is almost completed and the first floor is 
being frescoed. 

The members of the Sophomore class have received their class 
pins. They are of gold, diamond shaped. The class colors, garnet and 
steel, are in enamel and altogether the pin is one of the prettiest class 
pins about the college. 

Dr. W. J. Zuck, the college pastor who conducts the chapel ser- 
vice for one week in his turn, during this month used a part of his time 
in presenting to the students short talks on the "Visions of Youth." 
He stated that these visions really give us a glimpse of the future and 
inspire us with higher ideals. Visions are natural and every normal 
person should have them. His addresses were interesting and his ear- 
nest manner in presenting them could not fail to leave its impression. 



H5 



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The week of prayer for students was observed at our college. 
The various classes held prayer meetings which were followed by meet- 
ings of the student body. 

Miss Frances Bridges, the National Students' secretary of the Y. 
W. C. A., was with us February 17 and 18. Although her stay here 
was short yet during that short time, she influenced us al) for good. 

Work on demolishing the walls of the old building has been sus- 
pended owing to the extremely cold weather. Portions of the walls of 
the new wing are still standing but will be torn down as soon as the 
weather will permit. 

On Jauary 26, the Day of Prayer for students was observed and 
special services were held in the U. B. Church in the evening. Many 
students attended this meeting and it resulted in an awakening of re- 
ligious sentiment, 

On January 26, Bishop J. S. Mills delivered an interesting and 
instructive address before the students in the chapel service. The Bish- 
op is not a frequent visitor to this service but when he comes his talks 
are always appreciated. 

The Student Department of the Pennsylvania Young Men's 
Christian Association was instrumental in giving Lebanon Valley College 
a rare treat when S. M. Sayford, the evangelist, was sent here. Mr. 
Sayford is an evangelist of national reputation and has given his life to 
the betterment of the college students of this country. He conducted 
meetings in the college chapel on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 
evenings, Feb. 15, 16, and 17. He also spoke in the TI. B. Church on 
Thursday evening. All the meetings were well attended and all who 
heard him were greatly helped and benefited. 

During the past month Prof. Lehman made several very interest- 
ing and instructive addresses before the students in the morning chapel 
service. He dwelt upon the various phenomena relating to the stars, 
as their size, comparative distances, their number, magnitude, and other 
interesting things. On hearing the wonders of the universe thus set 
forth, one cannot help being led to a contemplation of nature's God. 
Prof. Lehman has a great fund of such useful and interesting informa- 
tion at his command and the students are always glad to hear him. 

Prof. Daugherty also presented a series of short and interesting 
talks which were very helpful in pointing out the correct path for youth. 



THE FORUM 116 

Prof. B. F. Daugherty was recently elected as secretary of the 
Pennsylvania Anti- Saloon League which is so actively pushing the pass- 
age of a local option law at the present session of the Legislature. The 
professor is frequently called upon to fill appointments in the interest of 
this movement. 

Juniors Banquet the Seniors. 

One of the prettiest events of the present term took place on the 
evening of Jan. 25th when the Junior class banqueted the Seniors at the 
Colonial Hotel in Lebanon. 

Although a terrific blizzard was raging and traffic was almost at a 
standstill yet not a member of either class was absent. 

A committee of Juniors went to considerable trouble to decorate 
the banqueting room for the occasion and the dining room was tastefully 
decorated with the combined colors of the respective classes. 

The following menu was .served: 

Blue Points on Half Shell 
Buillon 

Olives Celery 
Salted Nuts 
Roast Turkey Lebanon County Filling 
Sweet Potatoes Cranberry Sauce 

String Beans Corn 
Colonial Punch 
Lettuce "Wafers 
Cheese 

Bisque Ice Cream Fancy Cakes 
Tea Coffee Cocoa 
Mixed Nuts 

J. Warren Kauffman '06 was toast-master and after the courses 
had been served the speechmaking began. The following were the 
toasts: 

President's Toast Kay G. Light, '06 

"Class of 1905" Oka M. Harnish, '06 

"Class of 1906" Ralph L. Engle, '05 

Our Old Administration Building, 

Jko. B. Hambright, '06 
Town Life C. C. Peters, '05 

All the toasts were witty and interesting and were thoroughly 
enjoyed by all. Photographer L. G. Harpel took a flashlight photo- 
graph of the banquet at its close. 



ii7 



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Glee Club Concert. 

On Saturday evening, Feb. ti, the Glee Club gave its home con- 
cert before a large and appreciative audience in the College Chapel. 
The various numbers were rendered in a pleasing manner and the many 
encores demanded showed that the audience enjoyed the concert. The 
program was as follows: 

Breeze of the Night, Glee Club; Quartet — Yachting Glee, Messrs. 
Stanton, H. Spessard, Jackson, Engle; Tommy, Glee Club; Reading — A 
College Yarn, Mr. Beatty; Kentucky Babe, Glee Club; Baritone Solo, 
Prof. Jackson; Huzza, Glee Club; Plantation Song, Mr. A. Spessard and 
Glee Club; Tenor Solo, Mr. Stanton; Reading — Hoosier Romance, Mr. 
Beatty; Quartet — Don't You Cry, My Honey, Messrs. Stanton, Spessard, 
Jackson, Engle; Mrs. Winslow, Glee Club; Glorious France, Mr. Lichty 
and Octette; Alma Mater, Glee Club. 

Germaine. 

On Wednesday, Feb. i, Germaine the magician, entertained in 
the college chapel, the largest audience that has this year attended the 
numbers of the lecture course. Those who came were well repaid, for 
his work was indeed marvelous. His skill in performing tricks defied 
detection. His performances in Spiritism and Occultism were very 
astonishing and were apparently inexplicable from any rational stand- 
point. Germaine well deserves the reputation that he holds and can 
expect a large audience if he ever returns to Annville. 

Valentine Party. 

On Monday evening, Feb. 13, Miss Ellen Mills entertained the 
members of the Senior Class at a Valentine party at her home. To say 
that the class spent a pleasant evening is putting it mildly. Various 
tests of the inventive genius were placed on all and the party closed with 
refreshments. Souvenirs of the occasion were preserved by those present 
and will recall a very enjoyable time. 

Programs. 

Beautiful souvenir programs for the Glee Club Concerts have 
been printed and were given out at the last concert. The programs con- 
tain a fine cut of the Club and are very attractive. 

Several concerts are now being arranged for and from present 
indications the Club will have all the engagements it can handle. 



1 



THE FORUM 118 
Corner Stone. 

In removing the ruins of the Administration building the original 
corner stone was found but unfortunately the contents were in a poor 
condition and crumbled to pieces on handling. The contents consisted 
of the first annual College Catalogue, Fereunchter Botshafter, a copy of 
the U. B. Discipline, a Holy Bible, Religious Telescope, a copy of Der 
Pennsylvanier, and a historical sketch of the college written by Hon. E. 
Benj. Bierman, who was then head of the Teachers' Department. The 
corner stone was laid in August 1867. 

Reception. 

At the close of the Glee Club Concert the ladies of the College 
pleasantly entertained the members of the Club at a reception held in 
the Art Room of the Conservatory. Refreshments were served and a 
very pleasant time was enjoyed by all present. The ladies certainly 
have the hearty thanks of the Club for their thoughtfulness and for the 
pleasant evening given to the gentlemen. 

Society Notes. 

Mr. F. B. Plummer represented the local Y. M. C. A. at the 
convention held recently at Johnstown. 

The Clionian and Kalozetean Literary Societies will hold a joint 
session in the Clionion hall, March 10. 

"The Glee Club" under the direction of Prof. Jackson gave a con- 
cert in the First M. E. Church, Lebanon, Tuesday evening, February 28. 

At a reecent meeting of the P. L. S. the following officers were 
elected for the term : President, Titus H. Kreider, Vice-President, 
Merle Hoover; recording secretary, A. W. Hermann; corresponding 
secretary, S. H. Waughtel; pianist, E. A. Faus; chaplain, M. O. Billow; 
critic, P. E. Mathias; janitor, A. S. Brenneman; assistant janitor, S. B. 
Long. 

Science. 

The Science Department has received from Mr. A. L. Sollen- 
berger of Chambersburg, through the kindness of Mr. Ralph Appen- 
zellar, very valuable specimens of gold and silver ores. These will form 
the nucleus of the new museum, for the contents of the fairly well 
stocked old museum were entirely destroyed. 

While systematic collections will be added in time, the college 
Will greatly appreciate gifts of minerals and rocks suitable for museum 
purposes. 



119 



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Junior Annual. 

Work on the annual is going steadily forward and many photo- 
graphs are at present being taken to make cuts for this publication. 

Exchange Notes. 

The Criterion this month is good throughout and we hope that 
the new staff will make the paper as much of a success as the old staff 
have done. 

It is interesting to note that the answers to the question, "In the 
light of the events of the past year is the world growing better?" in the 
Juniata Echo most of them take an optimistic view. 

We welcome the Comus and Skirmisher among our exchanges. 
The Comus is one of the best High School papers which we receive. 
"Senior thoughts for the New Year" is a new idea and adds to the 
paper. 

The article on the "Children" in the Amulet is well written and 
shows careful preparation. There are very few great authors who have 
not loved -children and who have not in some way or other expressed 
their love for them. 

The Gettysburg Mercury is in most ways a very commendable 
paper but there is one thing which I have noticed and that is the num- 
ber of orations written for some contest or other which are published. 
It seems to me that the articles published in a college magazine should 
be written for that paper alone. 

The citizens of Harrisburg and neighboring towns considered 
themselves richly favored when on the evening of the fourteenth, E. H. 
Southern and Julia Marlowe, supported by their strong company, pre- 
sented Shakespeare's tragedy, Romeo and Juliet. Quite a number of 
Annville's citizens and students availed themselves of this rare treat, 
and in spite of the poor accommodations, enjoyed the evening immensely. 

The scenery and accessories were the very best, combining grace, 
unity in variety, and beauty of form, producing marvelous description. 

Southern's Romeo was sad and melancholy always meditating and 
brooding over his love with Rosaline. This tendency grows upon him 
after he meets Juliet and becomes his habitual mood and disposition, 



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1 20 



for now, for the first time is he really in love. When we add to his 
melancholy and sorrow, the barriers in the way of his public marriage 
and the evils which soon after cross his path, we are led to sympathize, 
then pity, until we love him. His love for Juliet forces him deeper and 
deeper into melancholy, insult is added to injury until he seems to be in 
the hands of fate and is hastened to the catastrophe with remarkable 
quickness. He shows some moments of wonderful power and self con- 
trol, especially when he receives the message of Juliet's death. 

Miss Marlowe's Juliet shows a steady development throughout the 
play. We find her first playing lightly as a young girl. But when she 
comes in touch with Romeo her whole being becomes radiant 
with love and soon grief and sorrrow develop in her, utterly unsuspected 
depths of power, resolution, energy and endurance. We find each step 
in her development so clearly defined that we can trace each. 

Two such artists playing such plays reveal us the possibilities of 
a Shakesperian play. We do not then look upon Roemeo and Juliet as 
two giddy lovers ruled by passion and prejudice but we rather look upon 
them as two great personalities revealing to us life's possibilities. Death 
is made to appear a pleasure and we are satisfied when she dies on the 
body of her love with, 

" I will kiss thy lips: 
Hoply some poison yet doth hang on them, 
To make me die with a restorative. 
Thy lips are warm. ' ' 

On Saturday afternoon Jan. 28, committees from the Athletic 
Associations of Albright College and Lebanon Valley College met at the 
Lebanon Valley House in Lebanon in order to draw up articles of agree- 
ment with reference to the resumption of athletic relations. The articles 
of agreement were unanimously adopted. One of the articles calls for 
the playing of three baseball games during the coming season. 

President Roop delivered an address at the mid-winter reception 
of the Lebanon High School Alumni Association held in the Sons of 
America hall, Lebanon, Jan. 26. 



ensselaer \ 
> Polytechnic^ 

S?** |nstjtute » 



\ Troy, N.Y. 

Looul examination! prorlded for, Sand for a Catalogue 



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uAe Charm of* 

Sndividualiti/ 

77? arks every portrait produced 6y 

Sates* Studio 



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jCebanon, tPenn*a. 

Special states to Ci 'asses. 



FOR THE LATEST 
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One door west of Pennsylvania House. 



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visit will convince you of our ability to 
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L. W. SHAY 

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must have it. Address 

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H. H. KREIDER. JOHN E. HERR 

KREIDER & CO., 

CONTRACTORS 
and BUILDERS. 

Coal, Grain, Seed, Salt, 
and Lumber. 

Office and Yards on Railroad St., 
Telephone ANNVILLE. 



L. G. BOWMAU 



M. H. SMITH 

Smith & Bowman, 

Successors to A. C. Zimmerman & Co." 
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quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
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Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
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Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
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year : four months, f 1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

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7ff. jfc. Shaud, 

Dealer in 

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A full line of 

& oss Chocolate s 

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Oldest Established Stand in Lebanon. 

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^GROCERS 

623-25 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PA. 




Complete Encyclopedia 01 Amateur Sport 

Spalding's 

Official 

Athl etie 
Almanac 

For 1905 

Edited by J. E. SULLIVAN 

( Chief of Department of Physical Culture, 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition). 

Should be read by every college student, as it 
contains the records of all college athletes and 
all amateur events in this country and abroad. 

It also contains a complete review of the 
Olympic Games from the official report of Direc- 
tor Sullivan and a resume of the two days devot- 
ed to sports in which savages were the only 
contestants, in which it is proved conclusively 
that savages are not the natural born athletes we 
have heretofore supposed them to be. This is 
the first time in which the athletic performances 
of savages have ever been systematically 
record cd 

This is the largest Athletic Almanac ever pub- 
lished, containing 32o pages. Numerous illus- 
trations of prominent athletes and track teams. 
PRICE 10 CENTS 
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Send for a copy of Spalding's Athletic Goods 
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leums and Groceries 
It Will Pay You to See Us. Ladies' and 
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SHENK & KINPORTS, 

Main Street, ANNVILLE. 
1860 1885 

J. HENRY MILLER, 
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENT, 

S, W, Cor, 8th and Willow Sts,, 
LEBANON, PA. 




ALL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 



SHOES . . 



fieatly Repaired 

at Reasonable Piuees. 



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East main St. flnnVille. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 
Furniture and Undertaking, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Lemberger's compound tar Lozenges 

IN BOXES— 25c, 10c and 5c. 

$LY PA A R f D LEMBERGER & CO.'S PHARMACY, Lebanon, Pa. 



JOS. L. LEMBERGER. Ph.M. 



FRANK GLEIM Ph. G. 



Tl 



If 




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5th and Liberty Sts. PHILA. 



Diplomas and Certificates of 
Membership. 



Commercial Work our Specialty, 



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Druggist. 



Students' Headquarters ! 

Perfumes, Toilet and Fancy 
Articles, Cigars, Etc, 



.ANNVILLE, PA. 



WILLIAM P. GAMBER, 

Successor to GAMBER & FAILER. 

who...... and Retan Dealer „ HARDWARE and HOUSE-FURNISHINGS- 



Heaters, Ranges, Furnaces, Tinsmithing, Plumbing, Gem Ice Cream 
Freezers, Zero Refrigerators, (charcoal filled ; Sterling Puritan Oil Stoves 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



No. 43 North gtri St„ LEBANON, J^A 



Do Vou Know 



That we are headquarters for everything in Books ? 
Writt to us for prices on the following s Geikie's Bible 
Helps, Expositor's Bible. In fact we will furnish you 
anything in the Book line, at reasonable prices. 

U. B. Publishing Bouse, 

Dayton, Ohio. 

2v£. IE 3 . Spangler 

LEBANON. PA. 



Building: 

F £ iler Liabilit¥ INSURANCE A ° 0ide p n Le Glass" 6 



/Honey to Lend to Students 

on prospects ? Can not afford it ! Why not get your life insured ? That will 
furnish the necessary protection, a good investment and the easiest method of saving 
money. You should go into the 

Northwestern Life Insurance Co. 

Because it has proportionately the 

LOWEST EXPENSES therefore 17 EST DIVIDENDS 

OWEST DEATH RATE T |<EST CONTRACT 

ARGEST EARNINGS GIVES *-*EST SATISFACTION 

FOR PROOF OF THESE STATEMENTS CONSULT 

H. T. ATKINS, 826 Cumberland St., Lebanon, General Agent 
A. a. MOVER and C. C. PETERS, College Dormitory, Special Agents. 



jCebanon Valley College^ 

jinnville, !Pa. 



This College, founded in 1866 and chartered with full university privileges 
by our State Legislature in 1867, stands for character, high scholarship and noble 
manhood and womanhood. Here choice young people from various states come 
into competition and fellowship with one another, and with teachers of high 
character, sound learning and progressive methods and ideas. 

TJhe College Department 

Offers five Groups of Studies leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. The 

groups bear the names of the leading subjects included in them. They are : the 

Classical Group, the Philosophical Group, the Chemical-Biological Group, the 
Historical- Political Group, and the Modern Language Group. 

TJhe Academic Department 

Covers the work of the standard High and Normal Schools and Academies 
and prepares for College, Teaching and Business. 

TJhe Conservatory of 7/fusic 

Offers complete courses in Pianoforte, Voice, Organ, Harmony, etc., after methods 
of the foremost European Conservatories. The various branches of art are also taught. 



Advantages : 



Thoroughness, Cheapness, Completeness, Commodious Buildings and a Fine 
Campus for Athletic purposes. 

The personal attention given each student secures to him a splendid educa- 
tion under the most stimulating influences. 



Spring Uerm begins jfprit 3, '05; Jail Uerm Sept. //, * 05 



&or further information jtddress 

Pres. Jtervin 7/. Poop, Ph. *D., 

Jinnville, SPa. 



THE 

FORUM 



MARCH, 1905 




Lebanon Valley College 



WILL & GANTZ, 



Fresh . . . 
Groceries 



3T 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



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Successor to J. A. DeHuff 

Bookseller 
ana Stationer 

Lebanon, Penn'a 

A splendid collection of Pictures and 
Novelties suitable for Christmas Presents 
just received and sold at reasonable prices. 



Geo. Krause Hardware Co., 



Hardware 



Headquarters for Afhifttir Goods, Base Ball Supplies, Tents, Ham 
mocks. Refrigerators, Etc. 



BICYCLES AND BICYCLE SUNDRIES. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



J. C. Schmidt 

Jeweler 
* nd Optician 

743-45 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PENN'A 



aOOD THINGS ONLY ARE GIFTS 
FROM US. Also REPAIRING. 



* Gallatin * 

Headquarter* For 

fine Confectionery, Choice 
fruits ana nuts. 



RESTAURANT ATTACHED 

Oysters In All Styles 



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10 Per Cent, Discount to Students 

FROM US 

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High-Grade Footwear 

THE RALSTON SHOE THE QUEEN QUALITY SHOE 

FOR MEN— For style and service The best yet of all shoes 

these have no equal— PRICE $4 FOR WOMEN -PRICE $3 and $3.50 



THE COMFORT SHOE STORE, 

B. HUTH St CO., Proprietors. 

8th and Cumberland Streets LEBANON, PA. 



Established I856 



DR. ROSS' Sarsaparilla or Blood Pills 

Purify the Blood and Cure Dyspepsia, Indiges- 
tion, Constipation and Liver Complaint. 
Price 25 cents per box. By mail on receipt of Price. 

DR. GEO. ROSS & CO., 0pp L^ N oS^a. 



HARRY LIGHT 

BOOKS, and STATIONERY 

Cor. Main and Manheim Streets, ANNVILLE, PA. 

Our shelves are constantly tilled with 

New, Second-Hand and Sine If- Worn 

School and College Text Books 

Together with a Complete Assortment of 

Stationery, Wall Paper 
and Window Shades 

School and College Text BOOKS a Speciality 

We Buy, Sell and Exchange, Old and New 
Text-Books. 



THE FORUM. 



^>>^ M. A. BLAZIER 

^**^^i*^N/^^. Spares no Pains in Giving His Patrons 
^W/'/^^i^ Polite Attention and Good 

Which look Artistic and >\ 
True To Life. v ^^^ 

Reductions to Student 

STUDIO: 

839Cumb. St., LEBANON, PA. ^ 


C. E. Rauch, cl ^. of 

Offers Special Discounts 
to Students on 

Merchant Tailoring. 

10th and Cumberland Streets, 
LEBANON, PA. 


fioffman Bros. 

SELL 

Ulalkover ana $oro$i$ 

$boe$ 

10 Per Cent, off to Students. 
Opp. court i)ou$e7 Eebanon, Pa. 



College Alumni 



Who lived in Annville during their College career 
should be sure to 

READ THE ANNVILLE JOURNAL 

And get all the Town and College News, 

OUR PRESSES TURN DDTM'TIMO p RCM THE 
OUT ALL KINDS OF riClTN 1 IINVJ PLAIN SIM' 
PLE EVERY DAY KIND TO THE MOST ARTISTIC, 

Every Job printed by us secures the best attention 
and has never failed to prove satisfactory. 

We are always pleased to show samples of our work 

Both Phone. -fcwJThe Annville Journal 

The Forum is a product of our press. 



THE FORUM 



Catering ... 

Weddings DIETRICH'S, 

OUR SPECIALTY 1015 N. Third Street. 225 Market Street, 

Fancy Ices, Cakes, Confections Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shipped Anywhere. Correspondence Solicited. 



flnnville electric Eight 
Company 

Electric Light Electric Wiring 
Electrical Supplies 

ol every description 

ANNVILLE, " * PA. 

Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
Dentist 

Reductions to Students 
72 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

THOS, H, ELLIOTT, 
Shoemaker 

Corner Main and White Oak Sts., 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

IF- BATDORF 

Dealer In 

Ladies' and Gents' 
Furnishings 
Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 

Harvey L. 5eltzer 

(Former] j- with Isaac Wolf) 
Strictly One-Price 

Clothier 

769 Cumberland St., LEBANON, PA 



JNO. S. SHOPE 

Queensware 
Groceries Hardware 

LADIES' and GENTS' 

Furnishings 

Discount to Students 

West Main St., Annville, Pa. 
JOSEPH G. KELCHNER 
Butcher 

Daily Meat Market of home dressed meats 

Also a full line of Smoked Meats. 
Annville, - , p a , 

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BINDER 

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Contents 



The United States In The Texas Revolution 121 



The Value of a Picture - - - 127 
Some of Our Campus Birds - - -131 

Editorial ..... 135 

Alumni Notes ..... 138 

College Notes 138 

Base Bull 13% 

Basket Ball .... 139 

Annville Academy - - - 140 

The Carnegie Library ... 141 

New Staff 141 

Society and Association News - - 142 

Ladies' Hall 142 

Prof. Pearson*s Lecture • 143 

Glee Club 143 

Personals - - - • -143 

The New Administration Building - 144 

Exchange Notes - - - a 144 



THE FORUM. 

Vol.XVffl. MARCH, 190 5. No. 6 

The United States in The Texas Revolution. 

( Concluded from Last Number. ) 
In the latter part of the year 1832 Sam Houston entered Texas 
on a mission to the Comanche, and other Indians. Historians have 
repeatedly stated that he entered Texas for the purpose of revolu- 
tionizing it, and that he was in possession of the private views of 
President Jackson. He is reported to have said as much when entering 
Texas. What he may, or may not have said upon entering Texas can 
not easily be determined. But the general impression prevalent to-day 
that Houston created the revolution, or that he was even its central 
ngure before the San Jacinto campaign, is not founded on fact. 

Just what Houston's mission to the Indians was is not certain 
His letter to President Jackson, written from Natchitoches, La and 
dated Feb. 13, 1833, follows: "Have been as far as Bexer Texas 
where I had an interview with the Comanche Indians. I am in 
possession of information that will doubtless be interesting to you and 
may be calculated to forward your views, if you should entertain any 
touching the acquisition of Texas by the United States. That such a 
measure is desired by nineteen twentieths of the population of the 
province, I can not doubt. They are now without laws to govern or 
protect them. Mexico is involved in civil war. The Federal 
Constitution has never been in operation. The government is essentially 
despotic, and must be so for years to come. The rulers have not 
nonesty, and the people have not intelligence. 

The people of Texas are determined to form a state government 
and separate from Coahuila; and unless Mexico is soon restored to order 
and the Constitution revived and re-enacted, the province of Texas will 
remain separate from the Confederacy of Mexico. She has already 
Deaten and expelled all the troops of Mexico from her soil, nor will she 
Permit them to return. She can defend herself against the whole power 
ot Mexico; for really, Mexico is powerless and pennyless to all intents 
and purposes. Her want of money taken in connection with the course 



122 



THE FORUM 



Texas must and will adopt, will render the transfer of Texas inevitable to 
some foreign power; and if the United States does not press for it 
England will most assuredly obtain it by some means. 

Now is a very important crisis for Texas, as relates to her future 
prosperity and safety, as well as her future relation to the United States. 
If Texas is desirable to the United States, it is now in the most 
favorable attitude that it perhaps, can be, to obtain it on fair terms. 
England is pressing her suit for it, but its citizens will resist if any 
transfer is made of them to any other power than the United States. * 
* * * It is probable I may make Texas my abiding place. In 
adopting this course I shall not forget the land of my birth". 

This letter seems to show that Houston is not certain of Jackson's 
attitude toward the Texas Revolution. At any rate, he is not writing 
as one sent to foment trouble. That he did not come to revolutionize 
Texas is shown by the statement that he "may make Texas his abiding 
place". The letter also shows that the revolution was pretty well 
advanced, for he says there is not a Mexican soldier in Texas. 

Houston was elected a representative to the Convention of 1833. 
After this convention he is not heard of until 1835. The revolutionary 
movements of 1835 and 1836 which resulted in the capture of General 
Santa Anna, "the Napoleon of the West" , as he styled himself, were 
not brought about by any one man. They were due solely to the 
oppressive measures of Santa Anna, and the Texas revolution would 
have run its natural and inevitable course had there been no such men 

as Andrew Jackson and Sam Houston. 

The report that Jackson sent Houston to Texas to revolutionize 
it can not therefore be substantiated. Other charges against Jackson can 
more easily be proved. He permitted the enlistment of troops in 
various parts of the United States to organize for service in the Texan 
army. Public meetings for this purpose were held at New Orleans and 
Natchitoches, La.; in Mobile, Ala.; in Frankfort, Ky.; in Zanesville and 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and in other cities and towns of the United States. 
President Jacknon not only made no effort to put a stop to these 
movements but apparently connived at them. 

The nature of these public attempts to raise volunteers in behalf 
of Texas is clearly shown by the newspapers of the day. The New 
Orleans Bee of Oct. 14, 1835, says: "The enthusiasm displayed by our 
fellow citizens at the meeting last evening in favor of the people of 



THE FORUM 



Texas, deserves the highest commendation. The meeting was intended 
to be only a preliminary one, consisting of the immediate friends of 
the Texans, and as soon the hour had arrived the committee room was 
thronged with an anxious audience. It was 'resolved that we will aid 
and support them by every means in our power, consistent with the 
duties we owe to our own government, to save them from the tyrant's 
military rule'. Lists were then opened for volunteers and money. 
With Zavala and Austin at their head, the Mexicans and Americans in 
Texas need apprehend little danger in their struggle for freedom and 
independence. But shall the citizens of the United States, in their 
individual capacity, remain listless spectators of eventful scenes like 
those almost certain to occur in Texas before a few months shall have 
passed"? 

At a meeting held at Natchitoches, La., Oct. 7, 1835, it was 
resolved "that the majority of the people of Texas are bone of our bone 
and flesh of our flesh, that they are engaged in the same cause in 
defence of which their and our forefathers bled and died,- the cause of 
constitutional liberty. 

Resolved that in times past we have freely and with an honest 
pride contributed our aid to the disenthrallment of Greece, the restora- 
tion of Poland and the liberation of Mexico, and that we cannot now 
refuse our sympathy and aid to those who are advocating the same 
principles, and who are endeared to us by every tie that can bind one 
people to another." 

This seems to express the real attitude of the people of the United 
States toward the Texas Revolution. 

On the first day of November, 1835, there was a call for a meet- 
ing in Boston to raise volunteers for Texas. Later in the same month 
according to Nile's Register, many volunteers were leaving Louisiana, 
Alabama, Mississippi, and other southwestern states for the relief of 
Texas. A party of one hundred were to sail from New York for the 
same purpose. The brig Madawaska, bound from New York for Texas 
to fight for freedom, was captured by the British on the ground of 
piracy, but the captives were afterwards released. The New Orleans 
papers report the number of volunteers from the United States in Texas 
at between 2000 and 3000. 

There was no attempt on the part of the United States Govern- 
ment to prevent this recruiting of troops in a neutral country. At least 



124 



THE FORUM 



one court decision was in favor of the volunteers. The question of the 
legality of such movements was raised by the Grand Jury of the 
United States for the southern district of New York, in the second 
circuit, in the following question put to the Court by them: ' 'Is it or is it 
not a violation of the 6th section of the Act of Congress passed on the 
20th of April, 1818, entitled, 'an act in addition to an act for the 
punishment of crimes against the United States therein mentioned' that 
meetings should be held in this district, and committees appointed to 
provide means and make collections for the purpose of enabling the 
inhabitants of Texas to engage in a Civil war with the sovereignty of 
Mexico now at peace with the United States?" 

The law referred to reads as follows: And be it further enacted, 
that if any person shall within the territory or jurisdiction of the United 
States begin or set on foot, or provide, or prepare the means for any 
military enterprise or expedition, to be carried on from thence against 
the territories or dominions of any foreign prince or state, or of any 
colony, district or people with whom the United States are at peace, every 
person so offending shall be deemed guilty of a high misdemeanor, and 
shall be fined not exceeding three thousand dollars and imprisoned not 
exceeding three years. 

The court decided that the case under consideration did not come 
within the provisions of this act, for the supplies were not sent "from 
thence' ' against Mexico, but were sent first to Texas. Sending supplies 
from New York to Texas to be used against Mexico is not sending them 
directly from New York against Mexico, and therefore not illegal. 

Thus by an apparently technical construction of the law, volun- 
teers could be raised and supplies sent from the United States without 
governmental interference. 

The opponents of President Jackson make a more serious charge 
against him than that of merely conniving at the organization of volun- 
teers for Texas. In the latter part of 1835 he ordered Gen. Gaines to 
the Louisiana-Texas line to defend the frontier against Indian attacks. 
By the treaty of April 6, 1831, both countries bound themselves expressly 
"to restrain by force all hostilities and incursions on the part of Indians 
living within their respective boundaries." Jackson's enemies maintain 
that there was no danger from the Indians and that Gaines was stationed 
on the frontier solely for the purpose of assisting the Texan revolution- 
ists. This is a mistaken view, for the Indians were threatening the 



THE FORUM 



125 



defenceless homes of the American citizens on both sides of the boundary 
line, and the Mexican side was of course without any protection during 
the memorable campaigns of 1835 and 1836. Gen. Gaines rendered 
substantial aid to the Texan cause by holding the Indians in check, for 
had the Indians in Texas joined the Mexicans as they were anxious to do 
Gen. Gaines would have interfered. He who crossed the boundary into 
Spanish Florida when occasion demanded, would likely have sustained 
his subordinate if he had crossed the line to defend the homes and 
families of Texan soldiers serving in Houston's army during the San 
Jacinto campaign. Gen. Gaines was no doubt anxious to render more 
direct service to the Texans than was possible under the circumstances. 
Yet the assistance that he rendered was of considerable importance. In 
the early part of the year 1836 the Mexicans invaded Texas with over- 
whelming numbers, and it is doubtful whether Houston could have held 
his army together during his famous retreat which ended in the success- 
ful battle of San Jacinto, had it not been for the presence of United 
States troops on the frontier. President Burnet recognized the valuable 
services rendered by Gaines to Texas in a letter full of praise for the 
latter's conduct. With all the assistance rendered by Gaines, it does 
not appear that either he or President Jackson went beyond their rights, 
or that they did anything unwarranted by the laws of the United States. 

Northern abolitionists have repeatedly stated that the Texas 
Revolution was a conspiracy on the part of the slave holding interests 
of the United States to increase their power. Much literature on this 
phase of the subject reminds one of the charges made by certain Northern 
men that Harrison and Taylor were both poisoned by southern conspira- 
tors, and that Buchanan's illness at his hotel in Washington prior to the 
inauguration, was a miscarriage of a similar diabolical stroke at the 
liberties of the country. 

There is scarcely any room for doubt that many far-seeing men in 
the South as early as the beginning of the Texas Revolution, hoped for 
its; annexation to increase slave territory, and we can readily believe the 
truth of the statement attributed to Upshur (afterward Secretary of 
State) in the Virginia Convention that he hoped Texas would be 
admitted because it would improve the slave market of Virginia. 

Furthermore the Columbia, S. C, Telescope, of Nov. 6, 1829, 
says : "The next session of Congress will deal with two great questions, 
the tariff and Texas. If Texas involves a discussion of slavery a rupture 



126 



THE FORUM 



with the North will be inevitable." Many people in the South saw wi- 
the Texas Revolution an opportunity to add slave territory to the United 
States ; but that the people of this country or any part of them, were 
officially or unofficially united in a systematic attempt to win Texas for 
slavery is without foundation. Not a single statement to substantiate 
such a charge has been found, but numerous statements to show that it 
was a struggle on the part of citizens of the United States to assist their 
brethren in their struggle for freedom. 

The financial assistance rendered by citizens of the United States 
to the Texans was almost indispensable to them in their struggle. 
Commissioners sent to New Orleans by the Consultation and afterward 
by the Council succeeded in raising substantial sums of money and 
important military supplies. The commissioners to the United States 
succeeded in creating additional interest and in negotiating a loan from 
citizens. The "twin sisters" cannon used at San Jacinto came from 
Ohio ; other cannon were fitted out at New Orleans. 

Alexander Dienst, in the Texas Quarterly, vol. 4, says : "It does 
seem to one that our historians dwell too little on moral support given 
Texas by New Orleans. The New Orleans Greys, who did so much to 
assist Texas in her struggle for liberty, undoubtedly came on account of 
the patriotic editorials from New Orleans. So in the days of the Revo- 
lution, Texas could not have succeeded if the journals of New Orleans 
and the United States had not befriended her ; and especially the press of 
the city of New Orleans, whence came ninety per cent, of the sinews of 
war. Four of the five New Orleans papers favored the Texan cause. " 

That the Texas Revolution was an Anglo-American movement is 
shown by the statistics of Texas population in 1836, as well as by the 
names and places of nativity of those who took part in the struggle. 

For, in the year 1836, the estimated population is given as follows : 
Anglo-Americans, 30,000; Mexicans, 3,470; Indians, 14,200; Negroes, 
5,000 ; total, 52,760. 

Of the fifty-eight signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence 
three were not Anglo-Americans. Of the Anglo-American signers, seven 
were from Alabama, seven from Louisiana, twelve from Tennessee four 
from Missouri, one from Florida, three from Arkansas, one from Vir- 
ginia, four from Kentucky, two from New York, one from Illinois two 
from North Carolina, three from Georgia, two from Pennsvlvania, one 
from Mississippi and one from South Carolina. The signers of the 



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127 



Goliad Declaration of Independence were practically all Anglo-Americans. 

Reference has already been made to the New Orleans Greys, who 
played so conspicuous a part in the Revolution. Ward's Georgia battal- 
ion fought bravely under Fannin, himself a Georgian. Few of the 
volunteers intended to return to the United States. Data are available 
to prove that nearly all the soldiers who fought on the patriotic side at 
San Jacinto were or became residents of the new Republic. 

In conclusion, it may be said that the Texas Revolution was an 
Anglo-American movement, brought about by the attempts of the 
Mexicans to oppress a liberty-loving people whose emigration they had 
at times encouraged. Mexican oppression was increased by the attempts 
of the United States to purchase the territory, and by premature upris- 
ings of the Texans. Anglo-American success in Texas colonization 
prejudiced the English and French nations, who helped to fan the flames 
of Mexican hatred. 

The Texans were bold to fight, because they were assured of the 
material and moral support of the people of the United States and the 
connivance, at least, of the State and National authorities. Even with 
support the cause would have been doomed to failure had not volunteers 
hastened to their assistance at critical moments. This willing assistance 
hastened the Texan conclusion to fight for independence rather than for 
the Constitution of 1824. 

There was no conspiracy on the part of the slaveholding interests 
of our country to win Texas for slavery at this time, whatever it may 
have been during Tyler's administration. In short, the Texas Revolu- 
tion is a mere phase of the western expansion of the United States. 

3C 3C 

The Value of a Picture. 

Aside from the actual necessities of comfortable living, there is 
nothing one sees more in the homes of everybody, rich or poor, cultured 
or uneducated, than pictures. Just why it should be true is interesting 
to consider. It may be that the hanging of pictures on the walls of their 
homes by many people is simply a following after the customs of previous 
generations or the fashion of the day ; or it may be, and it is to be hoped, 
that it is because of a higher spiritual want, a desire and reaching out 
after the beautiful, that is implanted in the heart of everyone. What- 
ever the cause, the result is, that wherever one goes, in homes, schools, 



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public buildings, and even shops and factories, one's eyes are continually 
falling on pictures, whether good or bad. 

The fact that so many pictures are constantly before us, making a 
conscious, or unconscious, impression for good or bad, makes it evident 
that they are an important factor in one's existence. 

Everyone realizes the effect of good or bad literature, and most 
people realize the effect of good or bad music, but few stop to consider 
the effect of pictures of whatever nature. 

There are two standards for judging the worth of a picture, one 
from an ethical standpoint and one from the basis of true art. Just as. 
everyone is aware that a book may not be bad nor harmful from a moral 
standpoint, yet may be very poor literature, and harmful in its effect on 
the general culture of the reader, so a picture may have no bad influence 
along moral lines but still may prevent, rather than promote, growth and 
culture. 

It is from the second standpoint, that of art criticism, that we 
shall consider the true worth of pictures and their effect, for anyone can 
tell at a glance whether a picture is good or bad in its moral character, 
and people in general, moving in respectable society, do not place 
morally bad ones on their walls. 

More people know the good and bad in music, and literature 
especially, than they do in painting. One reason may be that the works 
of great poets and authors may be sent all over the world, for everyone to 
have at his own perusal ; likewise in music, the compositions of the 
great musicians may be had by everyone who wishes to study their har- 
mony and to interpret them for himself ; while, if one desires to see the 
works of the greatest artists who have ever lived, he must travel all over 
Europe and visit the art galleries of its various cities. It is true that 
many of these masterpieces have been copied by artists of to day, and 
photographs taken of them, making it possible for people who cannot 
have the advantage of foreign travel to get some knowledge of their 
worth and beauty. 

Although it is impossible for people to own, or perhaps even see. 
many of the original great pictures, it is possible for them to see pictures 
that are works of art, painted by artists of the present day, and exhibited 
yearly in the academies and art galleries of our large cities. 

In order to be a work of art a painting must possess two qualities, 
representation and expression. It must be an impression or representa- 



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129 



tion of nature ; and must be expressed through the mind and imagination 
of the artist who produces it. To illustrate : a painter walks into the 
country, and a flash of sky and water, distant hills and nearby meadows, 
impresses on his mind's eye a picture ; not of sky alone, nor of hills and 
meadows, but a unity of all, with the sounds and odors and invigorating 
air, revealing a bit of God's wonder and works in nature, and his soul is 
touched by the flash, causing him to put it on canvas in such a way as to 
give the same impression that he received, to those who look at it; making 
them see as he saw, feel as he felt, and really think his thought. A 
photographer goes out, takes a picture of the same scene — sky, water, 
trees and meadows — and produces a picture true to nature in every 
detail, but without the expression of a human soul's thought of it, and 
therefore without art. It matters not whether the artist painted his 
pictures with a large or small brush, his trees with green or other pig- 
ments, but whether he has conveyed his impression and delight of the 
scene. 

Here imitation of nature is not art. A painter can imitate so 
exactly, copy so faithfully, that the result will be nothing more than a pho- 
tograph of the scene. When one looks at a mass of green trees against a 
blue sky he does not see every tree, every branch and twig and leaf of 
each tree, but he gets the impression of a great mass of foliage enveloped 
in light and atmosphere, and must paint it so as to express that mass, 
even though he does not paint a single leaf or branch of it. It is the 
appearance of reality, not reality, that the arti-t strives for. 

The same is true in portraiture. A man may sit for a photograph 
to one of the most famous photographers, and the result be a fine like- 
ness of form and feature. The same man may go to a portrait painter 
who studies his subject, sees him through his mind's eye, and gives to 
the world a picture of a human thought of the man, making him stand 
for some individual type of character. 

If pictures were of only one kind, those giving impressions of 
nature in the out doors, what a world of good they would do, in teaching 
man to go out and see for himself, God as revealed in his world of 
wonder and beauty. Browning says in "Fra Lippo Lippi." 
"We're made so that we love 

First when we see them painted, things we have passed 
Perhaps a hundred times nor cared to see. ' ' 

But pictures of the out doors are only one small part of the great 



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limitless field of painting. A picture may portray religious thought, 
historical facts, mythological beliefs, and may convey all the emotions 
of a human soul. 

Every picture has its subtle influence for him who sees. Who 
can look, not at, but into Raphael's Sistine Madonna, and not have 
nobler thoughts of motherhood and all its sacred meaning and obliga- 
tions ? Who can look at a picture of the statue of the "Winged Victory" 
and not feel his courage to do and be, strengthened ? at Millet's peasant 
figures and not feel the dignity of labor, and a sympathy that makes the 
world akin ? at Corot's wonderful thoughts of Spring and not feel his 
soul touched by the beauty and wonder of God as revealed in his works ? 

If so much may be had in development, culture and pleasure from 
the study and influence of pictures, can one afford to go blindly along, 
payin.r no heed to the subject at all? Many people will go miles to hear 
some good music, or to see some good drama produced on the stage, but 
will let opportunities of visiting art galleries slip by, remaining ignorant 
of the possibilities within their reach. 

Cultivate a knowledge of pictures and a corresponding love for 
them will grow. The person who reads Browning or Shakespeare for the 
first time may be able to appreciate little, and so not get much from the 
reading, but repeated readings will open up treasure stores of thought 
and beauty. 

One cannot afford to hang pictures that are worthless where their 
eyes will constantly fall on them. Rather have one picture that is good, 
than many that are bad or indifferent; rather an inexpensive copy of a 
masterpiece, than a more expensive chromo, such as hang on many walls. 
Every picture one owns should mean something to him of pleasure, of 
rest, or of help and inspiration. 

Henry Van Dyke says in one of his stories. "The real location 
of a city house depends upon the pictures which hang on its walls. 
They are its neighborhood and its outlook. They confer upon it that 
touch of life and character, that power to beget love and bind friendship, 
. which a country house receives from its surrounding landscape, the 
garden that embraces it, the stream that runs near it, and the shaded 
paths that lead to and from its door. By this magic of pictures my nar- 
row, upright slice of living space in one of the brown stone strata on the 
eastward slope of Manhattan Island is transferred to an open and agree- 
able site. It has windows that look toward the woods and the sunset, 



THE FORUM 131 

water gates by which a little boat is always waiting, and secret passage- 
ways leading into fair places that are frequented by persons of distinction 
and charm. No darkness of night obscures these outlets; no neighbor's 
house shuts off the view; no drifted snow of winter makes them impassa- 
ble. They are always free, and through them I go out and in upon my 
adventures." If this be true why not choose to look from windows that 
will broaden our horizon and enlarge our view? E. H. B. 

Some of Our Campus Birds. 

Our campus is the spring and summer dwelling-place of a numer- 
ous and fascinating company, so active and interesting that I am often 
surprised that we know so little of it. But to many persons a bird is 
only a bird, and unless one has an eye quick to observe, there is such a 
perplexing likeness among the different species that an attempt to distin- 
guish them is soon discouraging. Fortunate is he who has lived in the 
country and learned in his childhood their appearance and habits. 

But the person who has grown up without knowing a crow from a 
blackbird (and this illustration is not extreme) need not feel that it is too 
late for him to begin. I know a bird lover who began with a knowledge 
of twelve birds, including the pigeon and the English sparrow, and within 
a year was able to identify a hundred and fifty, and all of this with the 
aid of but two books and a field glass, and, of course, endless tramps 
into the country. 

A good way to begin the study is to look for just a few of the 
birds of brilliant plumage. If one tries at first to identify all he sees, he 
will become hopelessly confused. But the bright dress helps us to dis- 
tinguish the wearer, and fortunately we have many whose colors are gay 
at least in the springtime. A few of the commonest of these, and the 
surest to be seen frequently upon the campus, are the bluebird, the blue 
jay, the yellow warbler, the flicker and the Baltimore oriole. 

For convenience in description it is well to take a unit of measure- 
ment, and the English sparrow, being the commonest of all birds, and 
unfortunately the most familiar, would naturally suggest itself as that 
unit. But what the slum element is to modern society is the English 
sparrow to the society of birds, so let us choose as our unit the friendly 
and far more agreeable robin. He comes early and stays late, and his 
cheery call when first we hear it assures us that, no matter how deep the 
snow or how keen the wind, spring is surely on the way. 



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The bluebird, which the poets sing, comes sometimes as early as 
February, and ought to be familiar to us all ; but be careful not to confuse 
him with another bird of exquisite blue, the indigo bird, as he is called. 
The difference is easy to distinguish, for the bluebird has a cinnamon 
breast, with only his upper parts, wings and tail, bright blue ; while the 
indigo bunting, as he is also called, is all over his dainty little body a 
" glowing indigo." We can see the bluebirds any day from now until 
November on the campus, along the railroad, and up the cemetery road. 
I have found them very numerous along the railroad between College 
Avenue and the bridge, and they have a particular fondness for perching 
along the wire fence and on the fence posts. Listen for the plaintive 
note, which has been interpreted "Dearie, dearie, dearie, " but which 
sounds rather, as Neltje Blanchan says, like " Tru-al-ly, tru-al-ly, " to 
' ' our incredulous ears. ' ' 

The bluebird, from the end of his bill to the tip of his tail, measures 
seven inches, which is three inches shorter than our friend the robin. 

True blue is rare among birds, for we have but three or four of 
that hue, and our English cousins, who are without our blue skies also, 
have, we are told, none. So for the sake of his color, which atones in 
part for his many sins, not of omission but of commission, we must notice 
after the bluebird the blue jay. 

He will not be hard to find if we have either eyes or ears, for he is 
an inch or two larger than the robin, and his brilliant dress of blue, his 
fine crest and neckband, his numerous black stripes and his white-tipped 
wing and tail feathers, make him unlike any other bird and very conspic- 
uous ; while his shrill, harsh scream and his cry of " Thief, thief ! " ring 
out above the sweeter wood notes so that you must hear him whether you 
will or no. He has been called " dishonest, cruel, inquisitive, murderous, 
voracious, villainous ' ' ; his disposition is as quarrelsome as the blue- 
bird's is divine ; and he sneaks into the nests of other birds and devours 
their eggs and even their young. But " if to his lot " some grievous 
" errors fall," look on his coat and " you'll forget them all" — until, 
alas ! you remember that ' ' handsome is that handsome does. ' ' 

Our three other birds are more or less yellow, two of them decid- 
edly more. First is the yellow warbler, less than half the size of the 
robin. He is the color of the sunshine, and you will not hear his happy 
song, which is described by Neltje Blanchan in " Bird Neighbors " as 
" Wee-chee-chee, cher-wee, " until the golden days of May. Then he 



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will remain through the summer, but as soon as the cooler days of 
September are here, off he goes to the south, sometimes flying as far as 
the northern part of South America, where he will be sure to find sun- 
shine in plenty while Jack Frost is reigning in his northern home. 

The yellow warbler plays a neat little trick on a miserable devasta- 
or of nests, the cowbird, which does not take the trouble to build for 
itself, but deposits its eggs in the nests of other birds and leaves them to 
be hatched with the nestlings of the nest owners. As the latter are 
usually smaller and weaker, they are frequently ousted by the young 
cowbird, which then gets all the food intended for the family. The 
dainty little summer yellowbird, as the warbler is also called, builds a 
dainty nest, an exquisite, neat little cradle of glistening milkweed flax, 
lined with down from the fronds of the fern, which description suggests 
Fairyland itself. Into this tiny structure the cowbird drops her egg, and 
the little owner, to prevent the hatching of the intruder, builds a new 
bottom to the nest, covering over the cowbird's egg and placing her own 
on the soft floor above it. Three-story nests have been found, showing 
that the cowbird has repeated his visit and has been once more frustrated. 

There is but one bird you are likely to mistake for the yellow 
warbler, and that is the American goldfinch. There are several 
distinguishing characteristics, but the chief is that the goldfinch has a 
black crown, wings, and tail, and is the little fellow commonly known as 
the "wild canary." 

Thirty-six names, all descriptive, has the nicker, two of 
which will suffice for us,— the golden-winged woodpecker and the yellow 
hammer. An old tree, dead at the top, growing on the east side of the 
walk leading to the Indies' Hall, was one spring three or four years ago 
selected by a pair of these birds for a nest. They hammered out wood 
enough to form a little heap at the foot of the tree, following their 
custom of boring several holes more than they mean to use. The nest 
seemed to be completed when suddenly the pair disappeared. I knew 
at once what had happened. Their vigorous hammering and their 
brilliant appearance had attracted the attention of many of the students 
who eagerly watched the building, and the birds, not knowing friend 
from foe, grew suspicious and withdrew to a more secluded spot, greatly 
to our disappointment. 

The flicker is a handsome fellow, a fourth larger than the robin. 
As his second name indicates, he is a woodpecker, the under sides of his 



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wings when spread showing their golden lining. Above and below he 
has many colors, his head and neck, bluish gray; his back, brown with 
black bars; tail, black above and gold beneath; his breast ashy, thickly 
spotted with black. He boasts two crescents, a large black one on his 
breast, and a scarlet one on the nape of his neck. L,ike all the wood- 
peckers, his tail feathers end in spines, which he sticks in the tree trunk 
to help brace him as he climbs. 

He appears in March and stays till November. Among the 
multitude of blackbirds and cowbirds that throng our campus trees you 
will have little difficulty in singling out the handsome goldenwing, and 
to see him once is to know him always. 

But I have taken too much space already and yet I have not 
mentioned the bird that to me is loveliest of them all. I mean the 
glorious Baltimore oriole, so named from his colors, the colors chosen by 
the first Eord Baltimore, orange and black. A writer I have quoted be- 
fore relates the tradition regarding the name of this gorgeous bird. 

"When George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, worn out and 
discouraged by various hardships in his Newfoundland colony, decided 
to visit Virginia in 1628, he wrote that nothing in the Chesapeake 
country so impressed him as the myriads of birds in its woods. But the 
song and color of the oriole particularly cheered and delighted him and 
orange and black became the heraldic colors of the first lords proprietors 
of Maryland." 

Some trorning in May when the blossoming orchards are in the 
prime of their loveliness, you will hear a deep, rich note, mellow and 
almost bubbling. Watch then for a flash of brilliant yellow. 
"Hush! 'tis he! 

My oriole ! my glance of summer fire, 
Is come at last!" * 

When he alights, to sip a blossom or to warble a joyous song, you 
will see that he is in size a fifth smaller than his cousin, the robin; that 
his head and throat and the upper part of his back are glossy black; his 
wings, black with white trimmings, and his black tail marked with 
yellow; the rest of his body such a brilliant orange that it sometimes 
shades into a flame color. 

He darts and flashes and carols and calls, — yes, and he sometimes 
quarrels until his wife comes along with her sisters, who travel in flocks 
more leisurely than the male birds, and then he grows more quiet, while 
he watches his industrious plainer spouse weave the miracle of a nest 
into a long, slender pocket, which she gracefully hangs from the branch 
of a tree, where it swings in the wind, as secure as the young leaves 
themselves. E. W. S. 

* James Russell Lowell, quoted in "Bird Neighbors." 



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Vol. XVIII. MARCH, 1905. No. 6 

Editor-in-Chief, 

P. E. MATHIAS, '05. 

Associate Editors, 

ALICE CROWELL, '05 RAY G. LIGHT, '06 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS :• 
ETHEL MYERS, '07 JOHN C. RUPP, '06 

MERLE M. HOOVER, '06 EDWARD E. KNAUSS, '07 

Business Managers t 

J. WARREN KAUFMANN, '06, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 

C. E. SHENK, '06 MAX F. LEHMAN, '07 

The Forum is published each month during the college year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

TERMS :— Subscription Price, 50 cents a Year. Single Copy, 10 cents. 

All business matter should be addressed to The Fobum, Annville, Pa. ; all literary matter to 
P. E. Mathias, Annville, Pa. 

Once a subscriber, always a subscriber, until notice for discontinuance, accompanied with all 
arrearages, has been received. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second-class mail matter. 



Editorial. 

With This issue the members of the present staff relinquish the 
publication of The Forum to those appointed to assume the duties for 
the coming year. One year ago in embarking on the sea of journalism, 
we stated that our aim would be to reach the port of success. Whether 
we have in any measure realized this aim, we leave our readers to judge. 
The paper has not fully met our ideals and we sometimes found it 
necessary to use material that our better judgment did not approve and 
yet, as a whole, we think that the articles appearing in our columns 
compare very favorably with those of other college publications. We 
have always had sufficient material for our columns and we desire to 
extend our most hearty thanks to all who so kindly contributed articles 
for publication. The success of a college paper depends very largely 
upon the willingness of those who are able, to write articles for its use, 
and, for our successors we would bespeak the hearty co-operation of all 




136 THE FORUM 

such persons. Thanks to our efficient business manager, and to the 
hearty support of the student body, alumni, and friends of the college, 
the circulation of the paper has increased, while at the same time it has 
been enlarged and given a new cover. 

To our successors we extend our heartiest wishes for their success. 
Some of the duties connected with this work they will find far from 
pleasant but the same thing is true of any activity in life, and the pleas- 
ant things will more than balance the other side of the account. The 
training for practical life is not the least of the benefits received from 
work of this sort and this thought should stimulate the best efforts. 
With hearty thanks to all who have in any way assisted us and with best 
wishes for the success of the new staff, we bid our readers adieu and 
mate our exit. 

* ^ * 

The Field Club which has recently been organized cannot belp 
meaning a great deal to the individual members and the institution as a 
whole, if the work which has been planned is faithfully carried out. The 
Club has a twofold object ; first, to bring the individual members into 
closer contact with the forms of animal and plant life that are all around 
them ; second, to form a nucleus for the museum which the science 
department is trying to build up. 

Every student who is at all interested in observing the great throb 
of life which makes the fields and woods so interesting must at times 
have felt the desire to know that life more intimately. The most insig- 
nificant insect means more to us when we have spent some time in finding 
out its peculiarities, the tiniest flower means more when we call it by its 
right name. In this club there will be ample opportunity for us to study 
life forms systematically, and to help each other by a discussion of our 
observations. Should not each one of us use this opportunity of coming 
just a little nearer to the great throbbing heart of nature? We cannot 
hope to learn everything about the tenants of the woods in a few months, 
but we can single out one particular tenant and study its habits and 
peculiarities until we know it as our intimate friend. Will not all nature 
mean more to us because of our intimate knowledge of her humblest 
tenants? Will not nature's God seem more real to us because we see her 
loving care even in the lower forms of animal life ? Let as many of us 
as find it convenient join the Field Clnb and help in making the collec- 
tion of specimens for the museum ; let all of us make an earnest effort to 



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137 



come in closer touch with the different forms of life that will soon be 
'turning the bare fields and woods into the most interesting sermons and 
books. 

* * * 

The Time for baseball is at hand and the indications are for a 
good season at Lebanon Valley. Manager Kreider has succeeded in 
arranging a strong schedule which includes more than twenty games. 
Quite a number of candidates are trying for positions on the team and 
this is as it should be. A team is more likely to be successful when 
there is strong competition for positions on it and so we urge every one 
who has any ability in this line to come out for practice. One of the 
weaknesses of athletics at Lebanon Valley has been the fact that only a 
limited number have been candidates for positions. This being the case 
the 'Varsity teams have not had sufficient practice in actual games and, 
knowing that they were in no danger of losing their positions, some of 
the players have been very careless in reporting. These conditions 
could be remedied by having many candidates and good second teams. 
Some promising material for this year's team is available and it remains 
to be seen whether a winning team can be developed. Five games have 
been scheduled for the home grounds and they are all with good teams. 
This number, however, seems small in comparison with the whole 
number on the schedule. For several years there has been much dis- 
satisfaction among the students on account of the comparatively small 
number of athletic contests held at home and we think that there has 
been room for complaint. Financial reasons of course enter into this 
and partly justify it. It was hoped, however, that with the assessment 
of an athletic fee of five dollars this difficulty would be met but it seems 
that this is not the case. This arises from the fact that this fee was not 
made compulsory and collected at matriculation as was the evident 
intention of the student body on voting to impose it. In consequence 
some students have failed to pay it and the trouble is continued. Let 
us hope that this may soon be corrected It is the hope of the student 
body that Lebanon Valley may this year be represented by a team that 
will be a credit to itself and to the institution. 

The Junior Rhetoricals will be held on Thursday and Saturday, 
March 23d and 25th. 



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Alumni Notes. 

Wm. H. Kreider, '94, a prominent Philadelphia attorney, was 
elected to the Common Council at the late election. 

Alfred K. Mills, '04, was home recently. He accompanied his 
father, Bishop J. S. Mills, who while on a tour was taken sick at New 
Haven, Conn., where Alfred is pursuing a course in Yale University. 

Wm. C. Arnold, '03, was a recent visitor among his many college 
friends. 

Miss Edith Myers, Art '02, visited her sister and other friends at 
the College. 

Clyde J. Saylor, '00, a graduate in medicine of U. P., was recently 
united in marriage to Miss Rena Miller, of Lebanon. Dr. Saylor was 
formerly connecied with an Allentown hospital, and was very successful. 
The Forum extends congratulations. 

College Notes. 
Base Ball. 

On February 28 it was announced that A. J. Shenk had been 
selected as captain of the base ball team for 1905. Mr. Shenk well 
deserves this honor, as he is an excellent player and has been a member 
of our team for a number of years. Under his leadership we trust that 
victory may attend our team in the coming season, and that it may be a 
credit both to itself and to the institution that it represents. 

SCHEDULE. 

April 7, Mt. St. Mary's, at Emmittsburg, Md. ; April 8, Gettys- 
burg, at Gettysburg ; April 15, Carlisle Indians, at Annville ; April 19, 
Mercersburg, at Mercersburg ; April 20, H. A. C, at Harrisburg ; April 
22, Felton Ath. Club, at Steelton ; April 29, Indians, at Carlisle ; May 
6, Gettysburg, at Annville ; May 1 1 , Susquehanna Univ. , at Selinsgrove ; 
May 12, State College, at State College ; May 13. Bucknell, at Lewis- 
burg ; May 19, Wilmington A. A., at Wilmington ; May 20, Delaware, 
at Newark, Del. ; May 25, Susquehanna, at Annville ; May 28, Albright, 
at Myerstown ; May 30, Chester, at Chester, two games ; June 3, 
Albright, at Annville ; June 8, Albright, at Myerstown ; June 10, 
Kutztown, at Kutztown ; June 14, Muhlenberg, at Annville. 

Manager, T. H. Kreider, '05. Captain, A. J. Shenk, '05. 



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139 



Basket Ball. 

This season which began rather disastrously for Lebanon Valley, 
ended with some of the most brilliant playing ever seen here. After the 
team had been strengthened it defeated some of the strongest teams of 
the season. We publish a list of the season's scores, which areas nearly 
accurate as we could obtain, no careful record having been preserved of 
some minor games : 













L. V. 


Opp 


Dec. 15, 


h. V. 




Co. H., 


at Annville, 


27 


18 


Jan. 25, 


(1 it 


< < 


Chambersburg, 


at Lebanon, 


8 


19 


Feb. 3, 


(i < < 


< < 


Gettysburg, 


at Gettysburg, 


10 


57 


" 4, 


< < n 


< < 


Dickinson, 


at Carlisle, 


13 


28 


" 9, 




< < 


Pine Grove, 


at Pine Grove, 


8 


19 


" 11, 


< < < < 


> < 


Schulkill Seminary, 


at Reading, 


13 


32 


" 16, 


< < < < 


< < 


Bucknell, 


at Lewisburg, 


14 


28 


" 17, 






Bloomsburg, 


at Bloomsburg, 


18 


22 


" 18, 


ci n 


< < 


Susquehanna, 


at Selins Grove, 


24 


13 


*' 22, 


< < < t 


< < 


Middletown, 


at Middletown, 


40 


12 


" 24, 


<< < i 


< < 


Gettysburg, 


at Annville, 


30 


17 


Mar. 4, 


< < < < 


< < 


Bucknell, 


at 


3i 


10 


" 11, 


< < < < 


< ( 


Susquehanna, 


at 


24 


19 



Considering the season as a whole we can feel well satisfied with 
it. The team in its trips away from home well represented the college 
which sent it forth. Although handicapped by the poor cage at home 
the team showed that Lebanon Valley can develop a team that will be 
a credit to it anywhere. 



Gettysburg 17 L. V. C. 30. 

The second game of the season played at home was played in the 
Town Hall, Feb. 24, with the strong Gettysburg College five. This 
was the second opportunity we had of seeing our team play, and the game 
plainly showed that we have developed a team this year that we can 
well be proud of. The home team won by the score of 30 to 17. 

Bucknell 10 L. V. C. 31. 

The best game of the season was played Mar. 4, with the Bucknell 
team, one of the strongest college teams in the state. Our team played 
a remarkable game. The team work was excellent and the individual 
playing was all that could be desired. Our five easily won by the score 
of 31 to 10. 



I4Q THE FORUM 

Susquehanna 19 L. V. C. 24. 

The last college game of the "season was played Mar. 1 1 , with- 
Susquehanna. The visitors put up a good strong game and the victory 
for L. V. C. was well earned. The team was weakened somewhat by 
the absence of Beggs. Oldham, who took his place, played a good game 
at every point. The score was 24 to 19. 



Annville Academy. 

A very interesting paper on "The Annville Academy," was read 
at a recent meeting of the Lebanon County Historical Society by Prof. 
H. H. Shenk. As this Academy eventually became Lebanon Valley 
College, its history will be interesting to the Alumni and friends of the 
college. 

In 1834, a private school was held in part of a blacksmith shop 
which stood near the present site of J. L. Say lor & Son's coach works. 
This school was later moved to a building which was erected in 1836 
where the present Ladies' Hall stands. 

In 1839-40, a bill was introduced to incorporate the Academy and 
on Mar. 28, it was signed by Governor Porter. 

The course of study varied considerably but always included the 
common branches and to these were later added Latin, Greek, German, 
French and Needlework. The school was coeducational throughout its 
entire history. 

In 1855 Prof. Daniel Balsbaugh, having purchased the Academy, 
changed its name to "Lebanon Valley Institute." In 1856 Prof. Bals- 
baugh purchased an additional piece of ground and in 1857-58 erected 
the present Ladies' Hall. 

After the death of Prof. Balsbaugh the property was sold to 
George Rigler, Jacob Shertzer, John Allwein, John K. Bachman, Peter 
Ryder, Joseph Bomberger and David Kreider. In 1866 these gentlemen 
in turn sold it to Rudolph Herr, George A. Mark, Rev. L. W. Craumer, 
John H. Kinports and George Hoverter, and on February 16, 1868, they 
donated the property to Lebanon Valley College, in whose possession it. 
has since remained. 



THE FORUM 



141 



The Carnegie Library. 

The new Carnegie Library Building, which will be completed in 
April, is a structure of which we are all justly proud. It is of the Italian 
Renaissance style of architecture, and is built of brick with stone trim- 
mings. However favorably one may be impressed with the exterior of 
the structure, there will be a pleasant surprise in store for him on enter- 
ing the building. 

The large hall leading in from the entrance on College avenue 
communicates directly with the stock room, where there are numerous 
rows of book shelves. One of the principal features of this room is the 
metallic ceiling. On the right hand side of the hall is a light, cheerful 
room, which will be used exclusively for periodicals ; a similar room to 
the left will be used for newspapers. A cataloguing and library room is 
also on the first floor. 

A large stairway leads to the second story, which contains a lecture 
room and six seminar rooms. The seminar rooms are so arranged that 
they can easily be thrown open into the lecture room, thus affording 
seating capacity for 250 people. The lecture room will be the center of 
the social and religious life of the students. The seminar rooms will be 
furnished with tables and chairs, and will be used by students for special 
study and reference work. A certain room will be used by students 
doing work in English, another by those working on history references, 
and so on through the various departments. This will be a great aid to 
those doing reference work in the different courses. 

The building is commodious, bright and cheerful. It is finished 
throughout with hard-wood floors. The walls are delicately tinted, and the 
wood work is dark. The building is surely all that any student could 
wish for, and it will meet the demands of the growing institution. 

New Staff. 

On March 14 the Faculty appointed the following persons as 
members of The Forum staff for the ensuing year : Editor-in-Chief, M. 
M. Hoover, '06 ; Business Manager, C. E. Shenk, '06 ; Assistants, M. 
0. Snyder, '06, Ray Bender, '07. M. O. Billow, '08, and Miss Shoop, 
'08, were appointed members of the literary department. Ray G. Eight, 
'06, Ethel Myers, '07, John C. Rupp, '06, and Edward E. Knauss, '07,' 
have been re-appointed. 



142 



THE FORUM 



Society and Association News. 

On March 5 the Christian Associations met in joint session, and a 
verv interesting and instructive missionary program was rendered. 
Andrew Bender led the meeting and the program was as follows : 

"A Japanese Girl from Childhood to Womanhood," Anna 
Garlock ; "A Message from Volunteers in China," E. M. Gehr ; "A 
Recent Attempt to Enter Thibet," Neda Knaub ; Male Quartet ; " Current 
Missoinary Topics," V. D. Singer. 

These joint missionary meetings, which are held each month, are 
intended to give a knowledge of mission work and to create an interest 
in the cause. 

The Christian Associations elected the following officers for the 
ensuing year : 

y. w. C. A. 

President, Ora Harnish ; vice president, Ethel Myers ; correspond- 
ing secretary, Laura Enders ; recording secretary, Effie Shroyer ; 
treasurer, Neda Knaub ; pianist, Margaret Berlin. 

y. m. c. A. 

President, J. B. Hambright ; vice president, E. M.Gehr ; secretary, 
John Eeininger ; treasurer, M. O. Billow ; chorister, A. R. Spessard ; 
organist, I. S. Seitz ; janitor, A. B. Brackbill. 

Clubs composed of students representing the various counties and 
sections represented in the College are being organized. These clubs 
will be photographed and their cuts placed in the '06 Bizarre. Some of 
the organizations may be permanent. 

On March 13 a Nature Study Club was organized at the sugges- 
tion of Prof. Derrickson. R. L. Engle was elected president, and Misses 
Effie Shroyer and Ethel Myers were elected vice president and secretary, 
respectively. 

The C. Iy. S. and K. I,. S. held an interesting joint session in 
the Clionian Hall on Friday evening, March 10th. 

X X 
Ladies' Hall. 

Work on this building is being pushed and it is expected to be 
ready for use in time for next year's work. The building as planned 
will be a fine piece of architecture and will be an ornament to the 
campus. 



THE FORUM 



143 



Prof. Pearson's Lecture. 

On February 23 the patrons of the lecture course enjoyed a rare 
treat in Professor P. M. Pearson's lecture on Southern Writers. His 
readings from Southern authors were well chosen, and his mastery of the 
negro dialect was nearly perfect. All of his selections were thoroughly 
appreciated by the audience, but especially those taken from the Uncle 
Remus Stories, by Joel Chandler Harris, and from the writings of Paul 
Lawrence Dunbar. This number closed the course for the school year, 
and the committee from the Christian Associations certainly deserves the 
thanks of the student body and other patrons of the course for the 
excellent talent presented in the various numbers. 

Glee Club. 

On February 28 the Glee Club gave a successful concert in the 
Centenary M. E. Church, in Lebanon. A large audience- greeted the 
Club and showed its appreciation of the numbers by hearty applause. 
The concert was held in the lecture room of the church. 

The Glee Club, under Prof. Jackson, will leave on March 30 on an 
eight day trip, and will sing in the following places : March 30, Ship- 
pensburg, Pa. ; March 31, Waynesboro, Pa. ; April 1, Greencastle, Pa. ; 
April 3, Chambersburg, Pa. ; April 4, Hagerstown, Md. ; April 5, 
Smithburg, Md. ; April 6, Harrisburg, Pa. 

ST ?C 

Personals. 

W. E. Herr is again able to resume his studies after a severe 
attack of typhoid fever. 

On Feb. 21 Rev. U. S. G. Rupp, pastor of a Lutheran church in 
Baltimore led the chapel services. 

In chapel Feb. 22, Rev. S. M. Shoomkoff, a native Macedonian, 
made an address before the student body. He was educated in America 
and after going back to Macedonia has again returned to America in the 
interests of the insurrection in that country against Turkish misrule. 



144 



THE FORUM 



New Administration Building. 

The work of excavating for the new Administration Building is 
going rapidly forward and it will stand on the site of the old building. 
The debris is being used to fill up around the new library. 

The plans for the building have been completed by the architect, 
A. A. Ritcher, and estimates are now being secured. 

The following description from the Annville Journal will be of 
interest: 

The building will have a frontage of 144 feet and a depth of 71 
feet. The shape of it will be marked by end wings and a central pavil- 
ion which latter rises about the roof forming a tower-like effect and 
contains a clock on the inside with a clock dial on the outside, six and 
one-half feet in diameter. On the centre of the building will be a bell 
cupola which will contain the bell that was used on the old building, and 
which will be electrically operated from the clock mechanism to ring at 
the different recitation periods. 

The building will contain sixteen class rooms and will be three 
stories high, designed in the Tudor Gothic style after the Oxford and 
Cambridge systems. 

Each floor, including the basement will contain a separate girls' 
and boys' toilet and cloak room. There will be two wide stairs for fire 
escapes on the rear. 

The first floor will also contain the administrative offices, includ- 
ing Reception room, the President's private office and a Treasurer's and 
Registrar's rooms; adjoining these will be fireproof vaults in the Base- 
ment and last floors. 

The space occupied by the President's and Reception rooms will 
be entirely fireproof with iron beam and concrete floor construction. 
The corridors will be of ample width, wainscotted with glazed brick. 

Immediately adjoining the President's room will be the Presi- 
dent's class room. The end wings are so arranged in each floor that 
they can be thrown together by raising the rolling partitions. 

All the inside walls are of brick and the exterior will be built of 
brownstone base to the height of the water-tablet with brick facing for 
the super-structure trimmed with stone and terra cotta. 

The building will be equipped with modern plumbing appliances, 
electric lighting and steam heat, from a central light and heating plant, 
which will be built this year. 

The third floor will contain, in addition to the class rooms, large 
rooms for Society Halls. 

The entire central pavilion in this floor is taken up by the Art 
Department, where the classes in Art and Ceramics will be installed; 
adjoining these will be a model and supply room. 



THE FORUM 



Exchange Notes. 

There are exchanges of almost every sort. Some are devoted 
entirely to college news, others to solid literary matter or to the 
short story, while others present a pleasing combination of all three. 
Perhaps the last named approach nearest to the rank of an ideal college 
magazine. We all have our ideas of just what a college paper should be 
but we often fall far short of our ideal. The causes of this are various: 
sometimes the student body refuses its support and the editorial staff has 
all the work to do; in other instances it is lack of money. It is not 
possible for an exchange editor to know all the inside workings of the 
other papers and, perhaps, a paper is often censured unjustly. This is 
one of the hardest problems which confront an exchange editor, to know 
just what should be censured. So let us not be too hasty in judging but 
let us try to think that each one does his best. 

The Comenian this month devotes the entire paper to answers of 
the Alumni as to what they would do if they were at college again. 
While many of these answers are very interesting, it does not seem 
advisable to devote a whole number to any one thing. 

The Occidental has several good articles this month. The value 
of the article, ;, An Incident of the War," lies more in the fact that it is 
true than in the way it is told. It is too realistic. '"My Trip to 
Haleakala" is very interesting and is told well. 



Fraotrs Furniture Bazaar 

We are prepared, through 
long years of study, to 
offer a Superb Line of Fur- 
niture in all grades from 
which to make selections 
at low prices 

D. A. FRANTZ, Undertaker 

732-734 Cumberland Street, LeDaqon 


Rensselaer *\ 
/^Polytechnic^ 
Institute, 

V Troy, N.Y* 

Local examinations provided for. Send for a Catalogue 


Dr. Kauffman & Seidel 

Oculist, Opticians. 
706 Cumbealand Street, Lebanon 


E. B. Marshall, M.D., 

No. 34 East Main St., 
ANNV1LLE, PA. 



THE FORUM. 



uAe Charm of Sndividuality 

97? arks every portrait produced by 

Sates' Studio 



142 TfortJt 8th Street, 
IDiseount to Students. 



jCebanon, iPenn'm. 

Spee/at states to Ciassos. 



FOR THE LATEST 
AND BEST IN . . . 



HATS 



And MEN'S 
FURNISHINGS 



to Erb & Craumer 

777 Cumb, St, LEBANON 



1 tH Sbenk's 
Bakery 

Has always on hand 

fresh Bread, CaKes and Rolls 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

One door west of Pennsylvania House. 



A Complete fllusie Store 

PIANOS, - ORGANS, 
VIOLINS, - GUITARS, * MANDOLINS, 
BANJOS, SHEET MUSIC and BOOKS. 

Musical Goods of all kinds at Lowest Prices. 
Phonographs and Graph ophones from $io to $50. 
15,000 Edison and Columbia Records to select from. 

flliller Organ and Piano Co. 

738 Cumberland St., LtEBAJMO^, PA. 

FACTORY— Eighth and maple Sts. 



Jacob Sargent, 

merchant tailor 

STYLE. FIT and WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED. 



is*20 UL main St., flmwille. 



IF IN WANT OF 

Books, Stationery, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, FINE WRITING 
PAPER, FANCY GOODS, ALBUMS 
TOILET CASES, CALENDARS, CARDS 
GAMES, PURSES, HOLIDAY GOODS 
or anything kept in an up'to'date Book 
Store, call or write 

D. P. Witmeyer's Book Store, 

21 S. 8 h St.. LEBANON. PA. 



THE FORUM 



Kodaks, Cameras 
and Supplies 
Pictures 
and Picture Frames 



8th and Willow Sts., LEBANON 
My Specialties Are 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

AND 

CORRECTING VISUAL DEFECTS 





Having thoroughly learned both professions, can 
give the same practical service received in large 
cities. EYES EXAMINED FREE. 



D. B. SHIFFER, 



WEST MAIN STREET. 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



1.. (J. BOWMAN 



L. W. SHAY 

Candies, Nuts, Fruits 

OYSTERS 
IN EVERY STYLE 



WANTED 



A few agents for 
Annville and the Col- 
lege, the best seller out, every student 
must have it. Address 

C. S. ROSHON, 
34 N. 3rd. St., HARRISBURG Pa. 



H. H. KREIDER. 



JOHN E. HERR 



KREIDER & 68., 

CONTRACTORS 
and BUILDERS. 

Coal, GrainTseed, Salt, 
and Lumber. 

Office and Yards on Railroad St,, 
Telephone ANNVILLE. 



M. H. SMITH 

Smith & Bowman, 

Successors to A. C. Zimmerman & Co. 
Dealers la 

Carpets, Rugs, Mattings, 
Draperies. 



Carpets Lifted, Cleaned and Re-Laid 
at the Lowest Prices. 



768 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a Bketon and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
Invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confldential. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
vpeeial notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year : four months, $L Sold by all newsdealer*. 

MUN3 1 Co. 361Broadwa * New York 

Branch Office. 625 P St.. Washington. D. C. 



97f. Jif. Shauci, 

Dealer in 

Watches and f ewe try 

Sine Candies a net bruits. 
A full line of 
* oss C/l0C0iateS Downey 



THE FORUM. 



Oldest Established Stand in Lebanon. I 

J. H. SHUGAR'S 
SONS & CO. 
^GROCERS 

623-25 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PA. 




Complete Encyclopedia 01 Amateur Sport 

Spalding's 

Official 

Athl etie 
Almanac 

For 1905 

Edited by J. E. SULLIVAN 

( Chief of Department of Physical Culture, 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition). 

Should be read by every college student, as it 
contains the records of all college athletes and 
all amateur events in this country and abroad. 

It also contains a complete review of the 
Olympic Games from the official report of Direc- 
tor Sullivan and a iesume of the two days devot- 
ed to sports in which savages were the only 
contestants, in which it is proved conclusively 
that savages are not the natural born athletes we 
have heretofore supposed them to be. This is 
the first time in which the athletic performances 
of savages have ever been systematically 
recorded. 

This is the largest Athletic Almanac ever pub- 
lished, containing 32q pages. Numerous illus- 
trations of prominent athletes and track teams. 

PRICE 10 CENTS 

For sale by all newsdealers and 

A. G. SPALDING &. BROS. 

New York 
Philadelphia 
Buffalo 
Boston 
Minneapolis 



Syracuse 



Chicago St. Louis 
San Francisco Kansas City 
Denver Washington 
Baltimore Pittsburg 
New Orleans Cincinnati 
Montreal, Can London, Eng 



Send for a copy of Spalding's Athletic Goods 
'Catalogue. Its free. 



When in Need of 
Dry Goods, Dress Goods, Shoes, 
Notions, Hats, Oueensware, 
Carpets, Oil Cloth, Line 
leums and Groceries 
It Will Pay You to See Us. Ladies' and 
Gents' Furnishings and Shoes a Specialty 



SHENK & KINPORTS, 

Main Street. ANNVILLE. 
1860 1885 

J. HENRY MILLER, 
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENT, 

S. W. Cor. 8th and Willow Sts„ 
LEBANON, PA, 



ALL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 



SHOES . . 



fieatly Impaired 

at Reasonable Ppiees. 



Wm, D. ELtLiIOTT, 

East main St. flnnville. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 
Furniture and Undertaking:, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Lemberger's compound tar Lozenges 

IN BOXES— 25c, 10c and 5c. 

titWf LEMBERGER & CO.'S PHARMACY, Lebanon, Pa. 



JOS. L. LEMBERGER, Ph. M. 



FKA.V7C GLEIM. Ph.G. 




[ 




LITHOGRAPHERS 

5th and Liberty Sts. PHILA. 

Diplomas and Certificates of 
Membership. 



Commercial Work our Specialty. 



W. S. SEABOLD, 

Druggist. 



Students' Headquarters ! 

Perfumes, Toilet and Fancy 
Articles, Cigars, Etc, 



.ANNVILLE, PA. 



WILLIAM P. GAMBER, 

Successor to CAMBER & FAILKR. 

whoie, a ie a „d Ret.ii Dealers i, HARDWARE and HOUSE-FURNISHINGS. 



Heaters, Ranges, Furnaces, Tinsmithing, Plumbing, Gem Ice Cream 
Freezers, Zero Refrigerators, (charcoal filled ); Sterling Puritan Oil Stoves 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 



No. 43 North gtri St„ LEBANON, I A 



Do you Know 



That we are headquarters for everything in Books 1 
Write to us for prices on the following i Geikie's Bible 
Helps, Expositor's Bible. In fact we will furnish you 
anything in the Book line, at reasonable prices. 

U. B. Publishing Rouse, 

Dayton, Ohio. 

Building LEBANON, PA. 

Life nre |er Liability fflSlMNCE ^a,^ 

Money *> Lend to Students 

on prospects ? Can not afford it ! Why not get your life insured ? That will 
furnish the necessary protection, a good investment and the easiest method of saving 
money. You should go into the 

Northwestern Life Insurance Co. 

Because it has proportionately the 

LOWEST EXPENSES THffRCTollB r>EST DIVIDENDS 
OWEST DEATH RATE I\EST CONTRACT 

ARGEST EARNINGS G VES *^EST SATISFACTION 

FOR PROOF OF THESE STATEMENTS CONSULT 

H. T. ATKINS, 826 Cumberland St., Lebanon, General Agent 
A. 6 MOYER and C. C. PETERS, College Dormitory, Special Agents. 



jCebanon Valley College^ 

jinnville, !Pa. 



This College, founded in 1866 and chartered with full university privileges 
by our State Legislature in 1867, stands for character, high scholarship and noble 
manhood and womanhood. Here choice young people from various states come 
into competition and fellowship with one another, and with teachers of high 
character, sound learning and progressive methods and ideas. 

XJhe College Department 

Offers five Groups of Studies leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. The 
groups bear the names of the leading subjects included in them. They are : the 
Classical Group, the Philosophical Group, the Chemical-Biological Group, the 
Historical-Political Group, and the Modern Language Group. 

*Uhe Academic Department 

Covers the work of the standard High and Normal Schools and Academies 
and prepares for College, Teaching and Business. 

75 he Conservatory of Tlfusic 

Offers complete, courses in Pianoforte, Voice, Organ, Harmony, etc., after methods 
of the foremost European Conservatories. The various branches of art are also taught. 

Advantages : 

Thoroughness, Cheapness, Completeness, Commodious Buildings and a Fine 
Campus for Athletic purposes. 

The personal attention given each student secures to him a splendid educa- 
tion under the most stimulating influences. 



Spring Uerm begins J/tpril 3, 'OS; &all TJerm, Sept. 11/05 



3>or further Snformation Address 

Pres. Jtervin 9/. Poop, Ph. *D., 

Annville, SPa. 



THE 

FORUM 



APRIL, 1905 




Lebanon Valley College 



HMMI 



WILL & GANTZ, 



Fresh . . . 
Groceries 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



I. m. Graybill 

Successor to J, A. DeHuff 

Bookseller 
and Stationer 

Lebanon, Penn'a 

A splendid collection of Pictures and 
Novelties suitable for Christmas Presents 
just received and sold at reasonable prices. 



6eo. Krause Hardware Co., 



Hardware 



Headquarters tor AfhifttiY Goods, Base Ball Supplies, Tents, Ham- 
mocks. Refrigerators, Etc. 



BICYCLES AND BICYCLE SUNDRIES, 



Lebanon, Pa. 



J. C. Schmidt 

Jeweler 
* nd Optician 

743-45 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PENN'A 



QOOD THINGS ONLY ARE GIFTS 
FROM US. Also REPAIRING. 



* Gallatin * 

Headquarters For 

Tine Confectionery, gboice 
fruits ana nuts. 



RESTAURANT ATTACHED 

Oysters In All Styles 



Why Not? 



BUY YOUR 

10 Per Cent Discount to Students 

FROM US 

CILLEY & BENNETCH, 



SHOES 



169 North Ninth Street. 

LEBANON, PA. 



THE FORUM. 



High-Grade Footwear 

THE RALSTON SHOE THE QUEEN QUALITY SHOE 

FOR MEN — For style and service The best yet of all shoes 

these have no equal — PRICE $4 FOR WOMEN -PRICE $3 and $3.50 



THE COMFORT SHOE STORE, 

B. I^UTH & CO., Pi»oppietoi«s. 

8th and Cumberland Streets LEBANON, PA. 



Established I856 



DR. ROSS' Sarsaparilla or Blood Pills 

Purify the Blood and Cure Dyspepsia, Indiges- 
tion, Constipation and Liver Complaint. 
Price 25 cents per box. By mail on receipt of Price. 

DR. GEO. ROSS & CO., ° p \%°^a^. 

HARRY LIGHT 

BOOKS, and STATIONERY 

Cor. Main and Manheim Streets, ANNVILLE, PA. 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 

New, Second^Hand and Shelf- Worn 

School and College Text Books 

Together with a Complete Assortment of 

Stationery, Wall Paper 
and Window Shades 

School and College Text BOOKS a Speciality 

We Buy, Sell and Exchange, Old and New 
Text-Books. 



THE FORUM. 




M. A. B LAZIER 





Spares no Pains in Giving His Patrons 
Polite Attention and Good 



Which look Artistic and 
True To Life. 

Reductions to Student 

STUDIO: 

839 Cumb. St., LEBANON, PA. 





Class of 
81. 



C. E. Rauch, cl ? 

Offers Special Discounts 
to Students on 

Merchant Tailoring. 



10th and Cumberland Streets, 
LEBANON, PA. 



fioffman Bros. 



SELL 



Walkover ana Sorosis 

Iws 



10 Per Cent, off to Students. 
Opp. Court Rouse, Lebanon, Pa. 



College Alumni 



Who lived in Annville during their College career 
should be sure to 

READ THE ANNVILLE JOURNAL 

And get all the Town and College News, 

OUR PRESSES TURN DDlTVTTTlVTr* FROM THE 
OUT ALL KINDS OF iKHN 1 llN^J PLAIN SIM/ 
PLE EVERY DAY KIND TO THE MOST ARTISTIC, 

Every Job printed by us secures the best attention 
and has never failed to prove satisfactory, 

We are always pleased to show samples of our work 

bo* Pho M s ^^The Annville Journal 

The Forum is a product of our press. 



THE FORUM 



Catering . . . 



Weddings 



DIETRICH'S, 



OUR SPECIALTY 1015 N. Third Street. 225 Market Street 

Fancy Ices, Cakes, Confections Harrisburg, Pa. 



Shipped Anywhere. 



Correspondence Solicited. 



flntwilk electric Eight 



Electric Light Electric Wiring 

Electrical Supplies 

ot every description 

ANNVILLET 7 , PA. 

Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
Dentist 

Reductions to Students 
72 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

THOS, FL ELLIOTT, 
Shoemaker 

Corner Main and White Oak Sts., 
ANNVILLE, PA, 



JSAL. F- BATDOEF 

Dealer In 

Ladies' and Gents' 
Furnishings 
Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 



Harvey L. Seltzer 

(Formerly with Isaac Wolf) 
Strictly One-Price 

Clothier 

769 Cumberland St., ^LEBANON, PA 



JNO. S. SHOPE 

Queensware 
Groceries Hardware 

LADIES' and GENTS' 

Furnishings 

Discount to Students 

West Main St., Annville, Pa. 
JOSEPH G, KELCHNER 
Butcher 

Daily Meat Market of home dressed meats 

Also a full line of Smoked Meats. 
Annville, " *• Pa. 

W, G WOOLF 

Groceries and Provisions 

65 East Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 

Stephen Hubertis 

BOOK 



BINDER 



320 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa, 



Contents. 



Lyrics ----- 
A* Transformation - 
Modern Aspects of Photography 
Getting Along With People 
Editorial - 

The Lebanon Valley College Glee Club 

College Notes - 

Society Notes ... 
Personals - 
President Roop's Work 
The Corner-stone Laying 
The Junior Rhetoricals 
The New College Coach - 

Alumni Notes 

Exchange Notes 



THE FORUM. 



Volume XVIII. APRIL, 1905. Number 7 



LYRICS. 

(From the French of Victor Hugo) 

If you have naught to tell me, sweet, 

Why come so close to me? 
Why make me form this witching smile 

That heads of kings would quick beguile? 
If you have naught to tell me, sweet, 

Why come so close to me? 

If you have naught to teach me, sweet, 

Why tightly hold my hand? 
About the dream angelic, clear, 

Which haunts your pathway far and near, 
If you have naught to teach me, sweet, 

Why tightly hold my hand? 

If 't is your wish that I depart, 

Why do you pass by here ? 
I tremble when your form I see, 

My joy and my anxiety, 
If 't is your wish that I depart, 

Why do you pass by here? 



Tomorrow when the land with dawn doth glow 

To you, beloved, await for me 
By mountain high and forest green, I'll go, 

Away from you I can no longer be. 

I'll walk with downcast eyes in thoughts bent low, 

No sight I'll see, no sound I'll hear ; 
Alone, bowed down, my hands I'll cross, and oh ! 

The day, like night will be both dark and drear. 

I'll see no evening gold which lights my way, 

Nor sails that into Harfleur lean. 
And when I've come upon your grave I'll lay 

A bunch of heather sweet and holly green. 

N. C. Schlichter, '97. 



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A Transformation. 

Dave Weber was on his way to Westermoor to spend Christmas day 
with his daughter. Just why he was going, he was unable to decide 
and so was every one else. Mr. Weber, more commonly known as Davy, 
was the richest man in his town, but unfortunately was also the sting- 
iest. Davy held on to a penny, as though it were 'the only thing be" 
tween him and starvation. Not that Davy was not a nice old gentleman 
and generally liked but he was the closest, most grasping man ever 
known in Westermoor. Davy had been known to clean his yard in the 
rain with his bones aching with rheumatism, groaning at every step, 
rather than pay a quarter to have it done. The president of Wester- 
moor College had visited him once in the hope of persuading him to 
leave some of his wealth to that institution but all arguments were in 
vain. Davy listened to all he had to say and agreed to the truth of his 
statements and when the president had finished he said his brain told 
him that he ought to give but his heart would not let him. 

Now Davy had one daughter, Connie Weber, and she was as 
unlike her father as it was possible to be. She was always a gay, happy, 
generous creature and one who won the heart of every man. Davy 
idolized her and up to the time she married one of Westermoor' s profess- 
ors, he was even very indulgent to her. Even then, Connie's father 
never disowned her nor was there any strained relation existing between 
them. She made up her mind and remained firm and he did the same. 
He even bade her a tender farewell but that was all. He had a very 
poor opinion of professors in general and his son-in-law especially be- 
cause he made only a paltry twelve hundred a year. Connie asked and 
begged her father to visit them but Davy flatly refused. He loved his 
daughter, God only knew how empty his life was without her, but he 
was afraid — afraid that he might have to help them, and still more 
afraid that he might be asked again to give to the college. They need 
not think, was his unspoken view, that because his daughter married 
a member of the faculty that she could make him will his hard earned 
dollars to the college. 

Two years after, a little granddaughter had been born, and then 
Connie made one last plea; but he refused as usual. For two years he 
heard nothing from them. But this year not long before Christmas a 
tiny, tiny note had been sent the grandfather and when he opened it he 



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found not his daughter's writing but a little babyish scrawl which 
guided by older hands had been turned into the words, "Dear granpa, 
please come on Christmas to see your little Toddles." It must have 
been the word Toddles which made the grandfather put the note into his 
pocket instead of into the waste basket and decide to go. 

After he had started, he began to feel the smothered longing in 
his heart, grow and increase until the train seemed merely to creep. 
It had been snowing hard all the way but Davy so absorbed in his own 
thoughts had not noticed until he felt the train come to a sudden stop. 
When he heard that they were snowed in and could not get through till 
the next day he realized for the first time how great his desire for his 
daughter was. But Davy was not willing to admit it yet even to him- 
self so he settled himself for the night and went to sleep. 

He was awakened the next morning by a baby's voice shouting, 
" 'Ere's one, Mamma, wight by the c^r." Then he heard the mother 
trying to covince the little one that it was impossible for them to get it 
in the snow. Mr, Weber scrambled into his clothes and after a hasty 
toilet, came out to investigate.: The child, a dear little girl of about four, 
was still coaxing for what he learned was a wee little Christmas tree 
out in the snow. Her mother finally told Mr. Weber that they expected 
to reach home the night before, Christmas eve, and that her husband 
had fixed a tree for the little girl who was so disappointed that she 
wanted to have one here in the car. 

"Well, why not?" asked Davy, "why can't we have Christmas 
here?" Several other passengers who had heard joined in and before he 
had time to think, Davy, was wading thru the deepest snow after the 
smallest mite of a cedar that ever attained the honor of being a Christmas 
tree. When he was back, all the passengers had searched their baggage 
for trinkets to trim it and Davy remembered with a sinking of the 
heart that he had not a thing — surely he thought, — he must have had 
something along for Toddles, but no there was not a thing. He looked 
out of the window but there was no possible way to reach a store, eager as 
he was. At last he took off his watch chain and was as delighted as the 
child because it sparkled on the little tree, "That's all I have, dear," he 
said regretfully. "Ats all wight," she smiled lifting up her rosy face, 
"00 not got ittle girl?" Mr. Weber with a curious sensation told her he 
had one little granddaughter whom he had hoped to be with on Christ- 
mas. This seemed to establish a bond of sympathy between them and 



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all day he kept her, perfectly contented when she was happy. At last 
they started once more and far too soon for the old gentleman holding a 
sleepy little maiden of four, they reached Westermoor. With genuine 
sorrow he took leave of the little one and its mother and then all alone 
walked into the station. 

As soon as he left the train he noticed an awful red 
glow in the sky and as he walked further on he could see im- 
mense flames shooting up through the snowy air. He walked on, 
following the sight — he did not know where his daughter lived and he had 
not told her he was coming, so he decided to see what was burning. He 
had only gone a short piece when he became mixed in a large crowd and 
finally from the various remarks he heard, learned that the college build- 
ing was on fire. Then he rushed on until he reached the spot and across 
from the mass of flames he saw Connie standing on a porch gazing with 
horror-stricken eyes. It was the same charming Connie, a little older, 
a little more beautiful in her womanly grace but with an anxious strained 
expression on her face now which smote her father's heart. With one 
long stride he was beside her and four years of yearning went into the 
one word, "Connie." She turned, startled, and then with a glad, "O 
Father," she was gathered in his arms. Then they stood and watched 
the awful, magnificent sight for some time without speaking. At last 
Connie with an air new to her father said, "Father would you mind 
staying with the baby a little while?" and Davy fairly ran into the hous e 
where on the library couch he saw a wee little tot fast asleep. Before 
long she slowly opened her dancing eyes and holding up her dimpled 
arms said, "Ganpa?" and Grandpa so delighted he could scarcely speak 
lifted her into his arms where she cuddled down and went back to 
Dreamland. There that night with the great confusion outside, but the 
peaceful quiet inside, with his daughter's child sleeping in his arms, he 
fought the battle with himself, and the next week when a mass meeting 
was held for raising funds for anew college building, "Toddles" sub- 
scribed ten thousand. 



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Modern Aspects of Photography. 

Photography to-day has entered and made its influence felt in 
many different fields but that one which has perhaps the greatest human 
interest, which appeals not only to the aesthetic nature of man, but to 
his heart as well, is the place photography has been striving for in the 
realm of art. As a rule critics up to this time have not been willing to 
admit photography to an equal place with art, claiming that imagination 
and creative ability even if piesent in the photographer cannot be 
exercised, owing to the limitation of the camera. It is true the camera 
has limitations. A picture is often sharp and full of light. But this does 
not make it inartistic. The most serious difficulty with which 
photography has to deal is in composition of a picture the arrangement of 
the different parts and the taking out of those things which are unessential 
Yet with the many printing process and means of manipulation at his 
command, the artisic photographer has been able to obtain results 
which are beautiful in the highest degree. His field is a wide one 
especially if he has a true love and appreciation of the work. 

If we were to compare the aim of the poet with that of the artist 
and photo artist, we would find little difference in them. The poet 
appeals to the eye, ear, and heart of man, lifting him out of the ordinary 
trend of his life into higher realms. His medium is written language, 
and when we consider that pictures are the universal language of 
mankind, it will be easy to see that the aim of the photographer and artist 
is as high. Then it is every-day experience that when we hear or see a 
good thing we desire to tell it to our friends so that they may enjoy it 
with us. So those who are inclined toward the making of pictures 
desire to convey their thoughts, the things which have given pleasure to 
them and inspiration, to others. It may be beauty of form, the curving 
of the ocean wave, the simple grandeur of the mountain, some little 
scene of every-day life which has universal interest, the .awful grandeur 
of a thunderstorm, the sparkle of lighted shade in the glen, the laugh- 
ing of the mountain brook, the happiness of childhood in the laughing 
face of a child, the sorrow of age in the bent figure of an aged man 
sympathy with nature in birds, animals and flowers, the stillness of the 
woods of the glory of a sunset. It is something which has touched " a 
thought within which is too deep u for words " but which he wishes to 
make kuowu to others. It is that in life or in nature which has appeal- 
ed to him, and which he wishes to bring others to see as he does. 



150 THE FORUM 

And just as the poet appeals to the imagination, so the object of 
the artistic photographer today is to appeal to the imagination of those 
who see his pictures. In everythiug we see we are unconsciously 
influenced by all earlier impressions of similar things. A picture appeals 
to us because we have seen other things like those which it shows. 
Certain sensations and associations are called up by it — the glow of a 
sunset or driving rain and sleet — something we have experienced. And 
a train of thought is set up which takes us back over the incidents of our 
lives recalled by these things, and makes us happier or sadder as the 
case may be. But there is something still further in a picture. Memory 
and association cause us to think along certain lines and we like to go on 
thinking just as we like without being hampered by a lot of minute 
details in the picture. We do not want the novel and the poem or even 
the drama and the sermon to tell us all that is to be told — we want 
latitude to use our imaginations. So in a picture we must have room to 
think, to wander, and to build castles in the air. While it is in just this 
point that many photographs fail as pictures, yet photography has 
entered this great field and has accomplished results that are great in 
artistic merit. 

We find however the highest expression of photography in 
portraiture. This is true not only of the professional but of the amateur 
as well. It is in fact the chief end of photography from the amateur's 
standpoint. Portraiture has life, and deals with life at its various stages- 
The photographing of children is intensely fascinating since they are 
naturally graceful. Professional photographers are beginning to study 
the principles of art and to apply them to their work. Take some of the 
work of these photo artists and you will find a softness, a gradual shading 
and suppression of the minor parts so as to call attention to the principal 
object first. It is not possible to see everything in these pictures at a 
glance. They will bear careful study and the longer they are looked at. 
the more will be seen in them. It is this style of work especially that 
is bringing photography nearer to artistic perfection and it is this 
class that photographers use in their salon work. 

Another field in which photogrophy exerts much influence is that 
of education. There is today a vast army of amateur photographers and 
while many of them send their negatives to professionals to be finished, 
yet even in the taking of the picture, in the composition of the various 
parts and in the study of the varying conditions of light and shade there 



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are developed habits of accuracy and of individuality, and at the same 
time a fine sense of form and appreciation of the beautiful. By means 
of photography it has been made possible for nearly everyone to own 
copies of the paintings of the great masters, and in this way the aesthetic 
culture of the people in general has been put upon a higher plane, and 
they are influenced to make their surroundings more beautiful. For 
those unable to travel, photography has opened up the great, wide world, 
and given glimpses of life as it is in other countries. Photography is a 
great essential to modern journalism. We would dislike to do without 
the illustrations in our daily newspapers and magazines. In fact it is 
hard to estimate just how much of our knowledge of the world we owe 
to pictures, and the various engraving processes connected with them. 

One thing which must not be forgotten here is the pleasure which 
a collection of amateur pictures gives in after years. The delights of 
travel, beautiful bits of scenery, friends old and new, funny little episodes 
in our lives are all called to mind, and if we are given to dreaming our 
memory and imagination can carry us far away. 

One of the more recent aspects of photography is the exhibition 
of the work of amateurs. Money prizes and cups of great value are 
often offered and amateurs are encouraged to put forth effort to win 
them. Portfolios of all the prize-winning pictures are sent to each con- 
testant and thus new ideas are promulgated. 

In Science Photography holds a position of great influence. In 
astronomy it has helped locate many stars and nebulae otherwise invis- 
ible in the telescope. There is now in progress an undertaking the pur- 
pose of which is to make a photographic survey and photographic charts 
of the whole heavens. Photographs are also taken by means of the 
X-Rays and bullets, broken bones etc. are located by them. Then there 
are many photographic processes used in connection with printing such 
as Photogravure, Photolithography, etc. The beauty of the work 
produced by the photographic process of engraving, especially in the 
reproduction of paintings, drawings and photographs, has raised it to a 
position which bids fair to pass beyond wood, copper and steel 
engraving. 

Ever since the beginnings of photography its followers have 
sought persistently and intently a method for producing photographs in 
colors. It seemed such a little step from the producing of pictures in one 
color to their reproduction in natural colors that there were many 



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enthusiastic experimenters who sought to solve the problem. But when 
scientists came to study the subject more deeply they found it more 
serious than they at first supposed. Progress has been slow but during 
the past few years remarkably successful results have been obtained. 
The field of Photography is indeed a wide and interesting one in which 
to work and achieve and it is difficult to say to what extent it will be 
carried in its future development. 

Getting Along With People. 

Success is measured in great part by the ability to deal with the 
whims and caprices of men. Greater than all other business require- 
ments is this one peculiar faculty, the power of approaching men and 
women on a common level, and controlling their minds so thoroughly 
that they do not perceive their inferiority to the greater mind that is 
leading them. Close contact with people renders a cultivated adaption 
of temperaments and conditions absolutely essential to securing this 
power. Many cherished privileges and petted notions must be sacrificed 
in order that men of all dispositions, moods, and characters, may be 
approached in their own best way. You can't look at them all through 
the same glass and expect all to look alike. There can be no severer 
judge than he who measures all men by his own narrow standard , for 
the dispositions of men are as varied as the number of their race. He 
who has the broadest range of human knowledge, the greatest depth of 
human sympathy, will be most successful in that great measure of all 
success, ability to deal with men. 

The first step toward broad human knowledge of men is that we 
do not severely judge the peculiar notions of others, but try to look at 
them as they appear to themselves. This is only another way of saying 
"Put yourself in his place." Here is a man who believes that every 
other man is false. Do not wholly condemn him, lest, when all is known, 
he have more cause for cynicism than you would wish to confess. If 
"Uncle Remus" declares that education is "de ruinashun obde country" 
it is your business, brother man, to pity and elevate, not to censure and 
condemn. Man is too ready to judge, and too loath to praise. There is 
in everyone something that is good, something that is, in purpose at 
least, honest and honorable. Why can we not look for that which is the 
better aim of life rather than crush the purpose of good by criticizing 
the evil ? 



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An infinitely greater means of securing this broad range of human 
knowledge, lies in conversation ; but in this there lies also a correspond- 
ingly great probability of differences and disputes. Conversation may 
be conducive of good or evil results. It may pave the way for closer 
friendship or for greater enmity. In conversation lies both the power of 
receiving good and the possibility of receiving evil. Some persons carry 
on a conversation in much the same manner as they would tease a neigh- 
bor's dog. They are continually bantering opposition and encouraging 
argument. It is not needful to state the result. Such conversation 
never secures friendship; but it seldom fails to promote enmity. There 
are, on the other hand, conversations from which nothing but good can 
result. In such we avoid disputes and opposition as unworthy of our 
better purpose. It is this kind of conversation that we must seek if we 
would get along with people, for here our words have power because we 
weigh them in the character of the other's temperament. Our reward 
is greater friendship and surer confidence, which, in a measure at least, 
secures greater power and influence in our relations with men. 

There are times however when it seems almost necessary to force 
our opinions upon others, and compel them to act as we think. These 
occasions are very seldom, and even less often is the necessity of urging 
distasteful beliefs upon those who do not willingly receive them. If 
some one insists that the earth is flat, it is hardly wise to pester him 
with reasons why it must be round. It is about as absurd to compel an- 
other to adopt your standard of what is right, as it would be to give a 
lecture on economics to a beggar. Both might be needed but assuredly 
neither would be very appropriate. You must reach men by means of 
their intellect not by means of their will. If you have that knowledge 
of humanity that is as potent as it is undefinable, you will not try to 
force others to your opinion, but you will influence them in forming 
opinions that will be like yours. This is what we mean by the breadth 
of human knowledge. It lies not in force but in skill. Its strength is 
the power of harmony not of contention. 

Getting along with people implies more than freedom from active 
strife or from rasping differences of thought and sentiment. It implies 
the two great elements of friendship— sympathy and service. By sym- 
pathy we mean that affection that would scorn to wound even slightly a 
friend's feelings and by service we mean that compassion that impels one 
to bear another's burdens. He is lacking in both of these, who would 



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speak lightly of another's weakness, either of body, or of mind. If my 
companion is lame, and I am his friend, in all truth I will not advertise 
his misfortune in word or look. A man's crutch is no signal for fun, 
nor are the wrinkles of old age a fitting object of scorn. This sympathy 
shows itself even more clearly in our dealing with a friend's faults. 
Our best friends are those who tell us our faults and show us how to 
mend them, but we will not call him our friend who treats us lightly 
because of our faults. True friendship then is not the passing pleasure 
of an interesting acquaintance. It is the protection of the weak, and the 
care of the unfortunate. To be a friend indeed is to be a friend in need. 

But what shall be the test of sympathy or the acknowledgment of 
service? Beyond all doubt confidence is the answer for both. Nay 
more, in confidence lies the full measure of friendship. To betray it is 
to violate the most sacred bond of unity between man and man. Words 
spoken under its protection should be guarded as jealously as was the 
sacred flame upon the altar of Vesta. Nothing cau be more reprehensi- 
ble than to betray a secret at the expense or discomfort of a friend. It 
is no more of an excuse for publishing the confidences of a friend because 
they are not labeled "secrets," than it would be for taking arsenic 
because it is not marked "poison." But confidence need not be betrayed 
by words only, since it is expressed by wealth, influence, and position. 
The greatest power of man is not that he have any of these in them- 
selves; but that he be able to surround himself with men who have. 
Their measure of confidence in him will be in a great degree his measure 
of power. Confidence is the only signature recognized at the bank of 
universal experience; but as the gift of confidence is the highest endow- 
ment of friendship, so is the guilt of its betrayal the meanest spirit of 
injustice. Falseness in whatever found, or wherever existing is one of 
man's blackest crimes; but deception carried on under the guise of 
friendship and under the protection of confidence is crime dyed with the 
deepest dye. 

After all these restrictions have been put upon conduct, and all 
these rules have been studiously followed, that great personality of man 
which in some, we call talent, in others, tact, and in others still, the gift 
of genius, remains hidden in the inner life of man, seemingly without a 
name that will adequately express its character, or a rule that will fully 
secure its blessing. The secret of getting along with people is guarded 
so carefully and deeply within the mysteries of the human heart, that he 



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i55 



who hopes to make of it an intellectuality will never accomplish his 
desire, though he strive with the desperation of despair. But he who 
carries in his heart the sympathies of the human race will find that all 
the rule he need to follow is comprehended fully in the words of the 
"Great Teacher" who was so sincerely human, only because he was 
divine. His few words, given in answer to the Hebrew Scribe, remain 
the only inscription worthy to be placed on the keystone of the arch of 

friendship, and they are written so plainly that he who runs may read, 

"Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself." 



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T H E F O R. U M . 



Vol. XVIII. 



APRIL, 1905. 



No. 7 



Editor-in-Chief, 

MERLE M. HOOVER, '06. 

Associate Editors, 

RAY G. EIGHT, '06 JOHN C. RUPP, '06 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS : 
KTHEE MYERS, 'o 7 ERMA SHUPE, 'o8 

EDWARD E. KNAUSS, 'o 7 M. O. BILLOW, OS 

Business Managers t 

C. E. SHENK, '06, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 

M. O. SNYDER, '06 C. RAY BENDER, 'o 7 

The Forum is published each month during the college year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College. . 
TERMS --Subscription Price, 50 cents a Year. Single Copy, 10 cents. 

All business matter should be addressed to The Forum, Annville, Pa. ; all literary matter to 
Merle M. Hoover, Annville, Pa. 

Once a subscriber, always a subscriber, until notice for discontinuance, accompanied with all 
arrearages, has been received. 



irages, nas ueeu icravcu. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second-class mail matter. 



Editorial. 

Under east year's staff The Forum made a decided advance in 
every way over all preceding issues. Many of us remember The Forum 
of former years, small, inartistic, uninteresting and in almost every way 
sadly lacking in most of the features which go towards making a college 
monthly a succesful one. But last year the paper seemed to take on a 
new lease of life. It was enlarged, made more attractive by new cover, 
better press-work and better arrangement of the contents. During the 
year it was liberally supported by contributions from the student body 
and throughout the literary matter was bright and interesting. Greater 
care and space were given to college notes and every means was used to 
make the paper better in every way. Consequently the circulation 
increased and the year just closed was the most successful in the entire 
history of The Forum. 



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i57 



Accordingly the new staff assumes its duties upon a paper which 
has been placed upon a firm basis, but there also devolves upon us the 
duty of upholding a standard of excellence already high, and If possible 
to raise it still higher. The new staff will make few changes in the 
general appearance or in the contents of The Forum. 

We believe that the college paper has a distinctive place in the 
journalism of the present day. Primarily it is published for the student 
and for all who are interested everywhere in higher education. The 
periodicals of this class have a decided college tone. Accordingly to the 
ordinary reader the average college paper is dry and uninteresting. In 
the college world, on the other hand, the representative college paper 
should have a high place. It should have represented on its pages the 
best efforts of college thought. Our ideal college paper is one in 
which fiction, subjects of current interest to the student, literary and 
scientific articles, representative college verse, and humor have each a 
proper place. The periodical should also give sufficient space to the 
news and other items of interest of the college in which it is published 
and should as far as possible reflect the tone of the college which it 
represents. 

If the student body supports the new staff as it did our predecess- 
ors, we on our part will assure you that we will strive to attain 
to the ideal which we hold of a college paper and promise that 
The Forum will take its place among the best publications of 
colleges of our rank, and will be a credit to the college which we are so 
proud to represent. 

* * * 

The baseball season has already opened and brings before us 
several important facts which demand consideration by all students of 
the college. In the first place it is imperative that we recognize the fact 
that ten or twelve players and a manager cannot make a successful 
season nor one that will reflect credit upon the institution. If we as 
students hope to place athletics upon a higher plane we must accord the 
team our earnest and hearty support. Every student with an aptness 
for this branch of sport should attend every practice and create a rivalry 
for position on the team. This will mean faster and more uniform work 
and the best men will ultimately find places on the team. Those who 
cannot play should encourage those who do by their presence both at 



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practice and regular games. If there is any college spirit in you your 
place will not be vacant and your influence will be felt. But we should 
support "the team financially also. Let every student see to it that his 
athletic fee is paid promptly and at the beginning of the season so that the 
manager may not be restricted for want of funds. The spirit shown at 
class games is admirable and there is no reason why it should not be so 
at the varsity games. Come out and encourage the team that it may 
worthily represent the college. 

* * * 

To graduate from a college by completing the work 
that is required in a certain course is not all that a student can ac- 
complish to his own advantage. This of course is the great essential 
element in his training. But there are other functions, which have 
grown to be necessary adjuncts to the college, that offer opportunities of 
development to the student. It is not necessary for him to engage in 
them to attain a degree. Nevertheless they are in so large a measure 
valuable to him that he cannot afford to slight them. No literary 
student should think of leaving a college without having done consider- 
able service in one of the literary societies connected with it. No music 
student can go out from an institution with the greatest efficiency with- 
out having done practical work in a musical organization. A glee club 
in a college offers splendid opportunities for development to students of 
vocal abilities. In fact, it is an indispensable necessity. In it the 
student can secure helpful practice, which is of such a nature that he can 
obtain it from no other source. When the club gives concerts he appears 
before the public. On such an occasion he derives real benefit. At such 
a time he puts forth his greatest effort and effort is a thing that counts, 
no matter what one does. 

Moreover the glee club is an organization for which every student 
can feel an interest. It represents the college in that particular sphere, 
and is one of its attractions. All of us are proud to have our glee club 
go out giving concerts in the different cities and towns and return from 
a successful trip. It is also a means by which a college can make itself 
known to the people. Often a college is judged by the kind of glee club 
it can present to the public and no institution of merit is without one. 
A good club always adds materially to the reputation of a college. 



THE FORUM 159 

The Lebanon Valley College Glee Club. 

ORGANIZATION. 
Early in the fall term a mass meeting of the boys interested in a 

glee club was called to discuss the subject in a general way. Quite a 
number of the fellows responded to the call and the meeting was intense- 
ly interesting and spirited. Remarks were made by President Roop, 
Prof. Oldham and then the work and plans for organization were 
presented by Prof. J. Karl Jackson. 

Two evenings were set apart for all candidates to meet Prof. Jack- 
son at which time the voices of the applicants were tested with special 
reference to range and quality. Prof Spessard assisted in the recording 
work. Thirty applicants presented themselves for admission and of these 
twenty were selected. Prof. Jackson then selected Isaiah Meyer Klopp 
as the accompanist for the club. The names of those chosen were then 
posted and the first meeting called for Monday evening, September 19. 
At this meeting Prof. Jackson outlined very minutely the field of work 
we had to cover and pointed out to us the hard work as well as the 
pleasure connected with a Glee Club. 

September 22, Prof. Jackson called a meeting of the Club for the 
following Tuesday, September 27, when the officers of the club were to 
be elected. At this meeting the following officers were chosen : Presi- 
dent, F. Berry Plummer; Vice President, T. Bayard Beatty; Secretary 
and Treasurer, Elmer Hodges; and as Business Manager, A. R. 
Clippinger as it was thought best to have the manager chosen from the 
student body and not from the regular members of the club. Work was 
commenced at once and in earnest and by October 10, the first song was 
committed and by December 6, the first concert was given. 

PERSONNEL OF THE CLUB. 
First Tenors— Rutheford Giles Stanton, Arthur Charles Lichty, 
Harry Edgar Spessard, Benjamin Daugherty Rojahn, Thomas Bayard 
Beatty; Second Tenors — Max Fisher Lehman, Eber Esdras Ludwick, 
Mark Miles Evans, William Karicofe Wolf, Elias Martin Gehr; First 
Basses— Pearl Eugene Mathias, Elmer Vance Hodges, Frederick Berry 
Plummer, John Balmer Showers, William Wilson Shaner; Second 
Basses — Ralph Landis Engle, Ivan Joseph McKenrick, George Dickson 
Owen, John Brenaman Hambright, Arthur Ray Spessard. 

THE TOUR. 

When it was announced last spring that Lebanon Valley would 
have a glee club this year, students, alumni, members of the faculty, and 



i6o 



THE FORUM 



friends of the college looked forward with eager anticipation to the time 
when the college would be represented by an organization other than 
athletic teams. 

After the permanent organization each person, considering him- 
self very fortunate in being chosen a member of the glee club, began to 
work diligently on the music selected by Prof. Jackson so that by Dec. 6 
we were preoared for the first concert which was given at Derry Church. 
The concerts given at Palmyra Dec. 8, and at Annville Feb. n were 
very successful although not as satisfactory to the club as others given 
later. 

Much credit is due our manager, Mr. Clippinger, for his untiring 
efforts in arranging the trip through the Cumberland Valley. The trip 
was a great experience to every member of the club and especially to 
those who never had the pleasure of seeing one of the most beautiful 
valleys in Penna. Many of the fellows had never been south of the 
Mason and Dixon line and were very much interested in the historic 
landmarks of Maryland and the unsurpassiugly beautiful scenery of the 
South Mountain. 

The itinerary was as follows: Mir. 3, Shippensburg; Mar. 31, 
Waynesboro; Apr. 1, Greencastle; Apr. 3, Chambersburg; Apr. 4, 
Hagerstown, Md.; Apr. 5, Red Lion; Apr. 6, Harrisburg. At each 
place the club was greeted by large and appreciative audiences and it is 
difficult to say at what places the rendition of the program was the best. 
The acoustic properties of several of the halls were very poor, conse- 
quently the singing lacked the spirit and "snap" for which the club 
was highly complimented at other places. At Shippensburg, Waynes- 
boro, Chambersburg, and Hagerstown the audiences were much larger 
than those given at any time to any other college glee club. 

Receptions were held in honor of the club at Shippensburg, 
Chambersburg, and Red Lion. At Hagerstown Miss Anna Garlock, '08 
entertained us at her home after the concert and a very pleasant evening 
was spent. 

The club has sung to at least five thousand persons, the greater 
part of whom were undoubtedly pleased with the concerts given ; the 
comments of the press were read by many hundreds who probably never 
before knew little concerning L. V. C. ; the individual members of 
the club were entertained in at least a hundred and fifty or more homes 
and conducted themselves throughout as perfect gentlemen thereby 
reflecting great credit upon the institution they represented. 



THE FORUM 



161 



The club will give a few more concerts and then disband for this 
season. I,. V. C's first glee club was only an experiment the results of 
which have been entirely satisfactory to the college authorities and all 
others concerned. The glee club is a permanent organization to the 
college and next year there should be at least an hundred applicants for 
admission. The members of the club without exception realize that all 
credit should be given Prof. Jackson, our instructor and leader, and to 
Mr. Clippinger, our manager, who spent so much of their time in work- 
ing and planning for the success of the Club. 

F. Berry Plummer, '05, President. 



PROGRAM. 
PART I 

Breeze of The Night Lamothe 

Glee Club 

Quartet — Serenade J. A. Parks 

Messrs. Stanton, H. Spessard, Jackson, Engle 

Tommy Kendall 

Glee Club 

Reading — A College Yarn J. S. Wood 

Mr. Beatty 

Kentucky Babe A. Geibel 

Glee Club 

Baritone Solo Selected 

Prof. Jackson 

Huzza Dudley Buck 

Glee Club 

PART II 

Plantation Song Collin Co e 

Mr. A. Spessard and Glee Club 

Tenor Solo Selected 

Mr. Lichty 

Reading — Pro and Con Leland T. Powers 

Mr. Beatty 

Quartet— Don't You Cry, My Honey A. IV. Knoll 

Messrs. Stanton, Spessard, Jackson, Engle 

Mrs. Winslow Harrington 

Glee Club 

A Winter Song F. F, Bullard 

Octette 

Alma Mater Arranged 

Glee Club 



l62 



THE FORUM 



College Notes. 

Lawrence Maxwell has been chosen captain of next years basket 
ball team. 

On Monday evening March 20, the class in Freshman Reading 
under Prof. Jackson rendered a very pleasing program in the Kalozetean 
Hall. The program comprised recitations, readings, a pantomime and 
a short farce. The numbers were interspersed with musical numbers 
which added much to the evening's entertainment. The entertainment 
was excellent and reflects great credit both upon the class and upon the 
instructor Prof. Jackson. 

The work on the 1906 Bizarre is progressing rapidly and it will 
be out in good time. 

William Herr gave a party to the members of the Sophomore 
class at his home, College avenue, Monday evening, March 20. Mr. 
Herr, had provided various kinds of amusement for his classmates and 
served a four course banquet during the evening. All present report 
having an excellent time, and shall not soon forget the evenings 
pleasure. 

The ladies of town held a Bazaar and supper in the old library 
room in the Music Hall, Friday and Saturday evenings April 7 and 8. 
The proceeds went to the Building Fund. An entertainment by fifty 
children of Annville was also held during these evenings, which was 
thoroughly enjoyed by all. The college greatly appreciates the efforts 
of the people of Annville who helped to make the Bazaar so successful. 



Society Notes. 

The students of the historical-political department under Prof. H. 
H. Shenk have organized an Historical-political Club. G. D. Owen is 
president and Miss Alice Crowel is secretary. This organization is for 
the purpose of research along the lines taught in this group. 



THE FORUM 163 



The Clionian and Philokosmian Literary Societies held an inter- 
esting joint session in Clio Hall Friday evening, Mar. 17. 

The officers of the Saint Cecelia Society for the spring term are: 
Miss Laura McCormick, president: Miss Charlotte Fisher, vice president; 
Miss Emily Johnson, secretary; Miss Kathryn Ulrich, treasurer; E. A. 
Faus, chaplain; Miss Elsie Yeager, pianist; A. C. Lichtv, librarian. 

The new officers of the Clionian Literary Society are: Miss 
Frances Engle, president; Miss Ora Harnish, vice president; Miss Nancy 
Kauffman, recording secretary; Miss Neda Knaub, corresponding secre- 
tary; Miss Anna Garlock, treasurer; Miss Sallie Kreider, editress; Miss 
Ethel Ulrich, pianist; Miss Ethel Myers, chaplain. 

The Saint Cecelia Society gave a public concert in the Auditorium 
Monday evening, March 27. The program was excellent and the large 
audience present thoroughly enjoyed each number. 



Personals. 

Prof, and Mrs. B. F. Daugherty and son, Carrol, visited relatives 
in Highspire during vacation. 

Prof, and Mrs. N. C. Schlichter and Miss Edith Baldwin spent a 
part of the vacation in New York City. 

. Miss Erma Shupe visited her class sister Miss Anna Garlock in 
Hagerstown over vacation. 

Vinton Singer took a very pleasant trip through the Cumberland 
Valley visiting Lester Appenzellar at Chambersburg and Arthur Spessard 
near Hagerstown. 

Miss Laura McCormick spent her vacation with Miss Clara 
Eisenbaugh, '04, Music, at Red Lion. 

C. C. Peters was in Middletowu Sunday, Apr. 2. 

Miss Ora Harnish spent Saturday and Sunday, Mar. 18th and 19th 
at her home in Mechanicsburg. She entertained several members of the 
Glee Club during their stay there. 



164 



THE FORUM 



G. I. Rider preached at Middlesex and Mt. Zion on the Carlisle 
Circuit during vacation. 

E. E. Erb was in Chambersburg for the Glee Clnb Concert on 
April 3. 

G. D. Owen preached at Salem Church near Chambersburg, on 
Sunday, April 2. 

A. R. Clippinger preached in Mechanicsburg, Sunday, March 19. 

M. O. Billow took a very pleasant trip to Middletown over 
Sunday, April 2. 

M. O. Snyder spent his vacation in York visiting friends. 

President Roop's Work. 

Our president, Dr. H. U. Roop has been very busy during the 
last month. He has been intensely active in upholding the interests of 
the college wherever he is called to speak, and he is striving incessantly 
to awaken a keener interest in Lebanon Valley College by placing before 
the people a clearer understanding of its benefits and its need. Presi- 
dent Roop's program has been very full indeed, and he has soken to a 
quite number of audiences both in Pennsylvania and in adjoining states. 

On Tuesday evening, ^March 21, he gave an address before jthe 
Intercourse graded school in the United Brethren Church, of Lancaster. 
The subject of his remarks was " The Best Capital. " President Roop 
says that brains, character, and indomitable will is the best capital. 
Some think that money is the best capital, others that reputation is the 
best. President Roop emphasizes the fact that character is greater than 
these ; that brains and will is a more worthy possession than money or 
reputation. 

President Roop also gave the foregoing addresses at the commence- 
ment exercises at Gordonville. On March 21, he addressed the students 
of the Harrisburg High School and on the 23, left for Cay ton, Va., 
where he attended the annual session of the Virginia Conference. 

On Sunday morning, March 26, the United Brethren Church of 



THE FORUM 



165 



Hagerstown, was pleased to have the president preach for them. In the 
evening he preached to a large audience in the U. B. Church at 
Chambersburg. On the 31, he returned to Dayton Va. where he 
delivered an address to the students of the Shenandoah Institute. On 
April 2, he preached the morning communion sermon in the second U. 
B. Church at York, and in the evening spoke in the First U. B. Church. 
The following day he addressed the York High School students and the 
Ministerial Alliance of York County. On April 9, he preached in the 
morning in the Salem U. B. Church of Lebanon, and in the evening in 
the Memorial U. B. Church, both of these sermons were in the interest 
of the college and were very interesting and helpful because of the in- 
terest President Roop takes, not only in the welfare of the College of 
which he is the head, but also in broad human problems and life. 

The Corner-stone Laying. 

The corner-stone of the Ladies' Dormitory, which is now being 
built on the north side of the College Campus, was laid on Wednesday 
afternoon and was well attended by the students and friends of the 
college. The exercises began at 2 o'clock and were held in the college 
chapel on account of the damp weather. 

Bishop E. B. Kephart opened the exercises with prayer. Presi- 
dent Roop then introduced Dr. N. C. Schaeffer, State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, who spoke very strongly on the importance of a 
higher education and the benefits of a struggling college. He said that 
the struggling college is necessarily a live, active institution while the 
college that has all it wants has no incentive to work, and consequently 
becomes inactive and dormant. The struggling college is generally 
filled with struggling students, and the struggling student is generally 
the hopeful student and the successful student. Dr. Schaeffer also re- 
minded us of the large proportionate increase in the number of ladies in 
attendance at Colleges and higher institutions of learning during the last 
decade and considered it a significant fact that the corner-stone of the 
Ladies' Dormitory was laid first while that of the Boys' Dormitory is to 
follow. 

After the address, the audience sang "How Firm a Foundation." 
They then gathered at the south east corner of the building, where the 
stone was to be placed, and the exercises were continued. President 



THE FORUM 



Roop read the declaration and the audience sang two stanzas of America, 
led by Prof. Lehman, after which Bishop J. S. Mills offered prayer. 
The stone was then formally laid by President Roop and the exercises 
were closed with the doxology and benediction pronounced by Rev. I. H. 
Albright, of Reading. 

In the box, which was placed within the stone, were the following 
articles: Holy Bible, Religious Telescope, The Watchword, Woman's 
Kvangel, Conference Herald, College Catalogue, College Bulletin, 
College Forum, Annville Journal, Program of the Exercises and the 
names of the building committee, — President H. U. Roop, H. H. 
Kreider, Annville; and I. B. Haak, Myerstown. 

The Junior Rhetoricals. 

The Junior Rhetoricals always held during the Spring term were 
given Thursday and Saturday evenings, Mar. 23 and 25. Both evenings 
there were good sized audiences present. The orations were all inter- 
esting and well delivered. The Juniors this year were trained for their 
rhetoricals under the direction of Prof. Jackson to whom much credit is 
due for their success. The program of the first division Thursday eve- 
ning was as follows: 

Piano /a-Widmung Jensen 
iiauo \ b _ Ungarisch Jensen 

Kathryn Ulrich 

Invocation Bishop E. B. Kephart 

Oration — The Honor System J. Curvin Strayer 

Oration — Pygmies Emanuel E. Snyder 

Vocal — Come With Me Campana 

Constance Oldham Cecelia Oldham 

Oration — Newspapers and Public Opinion Cyrus E. Shenk 

Oration — The Value of the Classics in a College Education 

John B. Hamhright 

Oration — The Man Behind the Scenes Ora M. Harnish 

Vocal — Sing Me to Sleep Edwin Greene 

Eva Spangler 
(Violin Obligato by Miss Johnson) 
Oration — Modern Aspects of Photography Robert B. Graybill 

Oration— Machines and Good Government Charles A. Fry 

Oration— "The Strength of the Pack is the Wolf" 

Merle M. Hoover 

Piano — Sonata, op. 31 Beethoven 
Elsie Yeager 



THE FORUM 



167 



The second division appeared Saturday evening. The program 
was as follows: 

Piano— Kinawiak Wieniawiki 

Laura McCormick 
Invocation Prof. L. F. John 

Oration— The Spirit of Modern Strikes J. Warren Kauffman 

Oration— Conrad Weiser Ruth M. Hershey 

Vocal— The Seasons C. B. Hawley 

Grace Shaffner 

Oration — Celt or Teuton? John C. Rnpp 

Oration— The Strength of Man Irwin S. Seitz 

Oration— The Influence of Fire Paul M. Spangler 

Vocal— The Mountebank's Song M. Watson 

Arthur Spessard 
Oration — The Elective System — Advantages and Disadvantages 

Ray G. Light 

Oration — The National Banking System of the United States 

Max O. Snyder 

Piano— Dans la Nacelle Rafp 
Blanche Wolfe 

The New College Coach. 

Edgar C. Taggart, of Rochester University, Rochester, N. Y., 
has been secured by the college as director of athletics for the coming 
year. He will have personal charge of all athletics of the school and 
will coach next years foot ball team He comes well recommended and 
will doubtless do much towards raising athletics at our college to a 
higher basis. He will assume his duties September first next. 

Alumni Notes. 

Prof. J. E. Lehman, professor of mathematics and astronomy 
gave his interesting lecture on 'The Man in the Moon" to a large, 
audience at Rea Jing, March 24, and in Robesonia, March 25. He will 
give this lecture at Schuylkill Haven and Berne on April 14 and 15, 
respectively. 

Rev. I. H. Albright '76, of Reading was present at the laying of 
the corner-stone last Wednesday, and assisted in the exercises. 

Geo. W. Gensemer '80, and wife, visited their daughter in 
Annville and attended the St. Cecilia exercises, March 29. 



J 68 THE FORUM 

Dr. Harry M. Imboden '99, visited the college and attended the 
corner-stone laying. 

We are pleased to find a portrait of Mr. W. G. Clippings '96 in 
the Commercial Blue Book, of Dayton, Ohio. Mr. Clippinger is mana- 
ger of the United Brethren Book Rooms at Dayton, and has already 
taken his place among the representative business men of that city. 

Prof. EliasH. Sneath '81, of Yale University is the director of 
the new Yale summer school. 

Rev. J. S. Keedy '89 accepted a call as a pastor of the Congrega- 
tional Church at North Andover, Mass. 

Dr. C. J. Saylor '00 is practicing medicine in Womelsdorf Berks 
county. 

D. J. Cowling '02 was given an appointment on the Yale faculty 
at the last meeting of the Yale corporation. 

<«x? ? GV * H " H ' Y ° he ' OI has been placed in char ge of the department 
For the Boys" in "The Friend for Boys and Girls." Mrs. J. C. Myers 

a former student of the college conducts a similar department "For the 
Girls" in the same paper. 



3£T 3ST 



Exchange Notes. 

_ The College Student for March is bright and attractive It 
contains several good stories and other articles of a sort quite refreshing 
to an exchange editor accustomed to the somewhat dry and uninteresting 
articles usually found in the average college monthlys. 
The March Mercury is good. 

The attractive College Folio for March contains a very interesting 
biography of Napoleon Bonaparte. 

The March number of The Susquehanna has several bright and 
interesting essays and stories. 

tn i, T ^^™ ml *r of the PAaretra, the Februaray number, is up 
o its usual high standard of excellence. This monthly is more 

in our T m r ^ fa WSLy than the a ™*« * paper 

moor exchange list. < Pluck » in this number shows much original v 
and closely holds the attention of the reader throughout. The storv is 
very interesting and leads up gracefully to a well drawn climax 



THE FORUM 



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THE FORUM. 

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THE FORUM 



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THE FORUM. 



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This College, founded in 1866 and chartered with full university privileges 
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7Jhe College department 

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THE 



FORUM 



MAY, 1905 




Lebanon Valley College 



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Contents 



1 



The First Smile of Spring - - -169 

Talkative Miss Davis - - - 169 

The Progress of Education in Europe During 

the Middle Ages - - -171 

" The Revival Thermometer" — A Review 174 

A Visit to an Annvillc Barber-shop - -175 

Music and the Ministry - - - 176 

Editorial - - - - -183 

College Notes ----- 185 

Baseball - 187 

Society Notes - 189 

Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. - - 190 

Personals - - - - -190 

Lecture by Prof. Schlichter - - 191 

Alumni Notes - - - - 191 

Exchange Notes - - - -192 

A Picturesque Tramp - - - 193 




THE FORUM, 



Volume XVIII. MAY, 1905. Number & 



The First Smile of Spring. 

From the French of Gautier. 
While the men run breathlessly to their heavy work, March, who 
smiles in spite of the showers, secretly prepares for Spring. While all 
nature sleeps, he cunningly irons the little collars of the Easter daisies, 
and carves their buttons of gold. He goes into the orchard and vine- 
yard-the stealthy wig maker-with his powder puff, and powders the 
almond tree snowwhite with frost. Nature reposes in her couch ; he 
descends to the deserted garden, and laces the velvet green bodices with 
the pink tinted buttons. Meanwhile fashioning solfeggios, he whistles 
to the blackbirds in a low tone; he sows the little snowflakes in the 
prairies, and violets in the woods. Standing amid the cress of the 
fountain from which the stag drinks, his ears on the alert, he unstrings 
the silver bells of the lily with his concealed hand. He puts the ruddy 
tinged strawberry in the grass, for you to pluck, and weaves you a leafy 
hat to protect you from the sun. Then, when his work is completed, 
and his reign comes to a close, turning away from the threshold of April, 
he says, "Spring, you can come." E. E. Erb, '05. 

Talkative Miss Davis* 

Anna Lee and her friend, Miss Johnson were sitting together in 
the sitting-room. While they were chatting, Miss Davis, a lodger, 
passed through the hall and, seeing Anna in the room, entered it 
without being invited. Anna introduced Miss Davis to her friend. 

"Do you have any friends in New York state, Miss Johnson?" 
asked Miss Davis. ' 'There are quite a few people by the name of Johnson 
living at my home in Syracuse. Thought you might be related to them- 
I don't suppose all the Johnsons are relatives of yours. The same is 



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true of my name. You can find people everywhere by the name of 
Davis. ' ' 

"Yes, there are a good many colored people by that name," said 
Anna jestingly. 

"Don't mention colored people to me. I hate them. Why, if I 
had to do it, I'd take the whole bunch of them, stand them in a row and 
shoot every one down. When I was at college, a girl from the South 
roomed with me. She had an intense hatred for the negroes. And I 
liave too. Dirty beings, that's what they are. I tell you it works on 
my nerves when I see a certain colored family at my home driven about 
by a white coachman. Father had the same hatred for them as I have. 
He died when I was twenty years of age. I had just finished High 
School. I wanted to go to college. Father, of course, left mother some 
money but, in order that I might not be entirely dependent on her, I 
decided to teach school a few years. Then, there was my brother. 
Well, he is only an adopted brother but he's always been treated as if he 
were my true brother. I taught a few years and then went to college. 
I graduated and then got this position in your own town. My brother 
too graduated from college. He went west and at present he is physical 
culture instructor in the University of Michigan. You ought to see him. 
He's strong, broad-shouldered and tall. He can do the stunts for you. 
My poor old mother is alone at home in Syracuse. She is the only 
person I have to care for me in the world. When she's gone, I don't 
know what to do. At present she keeps my money for me. Why 
there's no place to spend it here. There are no places to go to like at 
home. I send her thirty dollars every month." 

Thus she talked and soon the clock struck ten. Miss Johnson 
got up to leave and, in the hall, she whispered to Anna, "We'll plan 
that party some other evening. 

Mary E. Peiffer '07 

The dates by lovers made and kept 

Have never yet been brought to light ; 
For they, while their companions slept, 

Were sitting up into the night. 



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171 



The Progress of Education in Europe During the Mid- 
dle Ages. 

In order to obtain a clear understanding of the state of education 
in Europe during the period of history known as the Middle Ages, a 
brief review of education in the Roman empire is necessary. In the age 
of Augustus education had reached the highest development known in 
the heathen world. All children were instructed in the elementary 
branches and many young men resorted to the famous schools of Athens 
and Alexandria to complete their studies. The courses of study at these 
schools were classified under seven heads, the trivium; comprising 
grammar, dialectics and rhetoric, the quadrivium; comprising music, 
arithmetic, geometry and astronomy. 

It was the fixed policy of the emperors, both by law and by 
financial support to further the interests of education. But notwith- 
standing their fostering care, learning steadily declined. As early as 
the first century of our era, the sophist was gaining ground, and by the 
middle of the second century "philosophy was an intellectual game and 
rhetoric an artifice." By the beginning of the fifth century learning 
was rare, literature and science non-existent, and the world had entered 
the Dark Ages of mediaeval history. 

So dark were those times that the brightness of Charlemagne' s 
reign served only to deepen the blackness of those centuries of strife and 
turmoil. The old order of things had passed away, the new had not yet 
been established and hence the time was of necessity one of transition. 
Pushed westward by the great hordes of the northeast, barbarian tribes 
who were strangers to all culture and learning and were seeking new homes 
among the Latinized tribes of Gaul. In the course of a few hundred 
years, the Latin tongue had become a dead language and in its place had 
arisen a hundred different dialects making communication difficult. 

Though the church has been blamed for the long continuance of 
this dark period, we shall see that she alone amid the ruins of civilization 
preserved some remains of learning and, as much as was possible in those 
times and with the implements at hand, used her power in the interests 
of education. The influence of the Christian religion which was to 
become the dominating influence during the Middle Ages, began to be 
felt as early as the beginning of the third century. Christianity taught 
that all men were free and equal in the sight of God and that this life is 



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but a preparation for an eternal life to come. The state therefore while 
exercising power over the body, could not control the spirit which 
belonged to the God from which it had sprung. 

That men might be taught the principles of the new religion and 
might be prepared for a future life, catechetical schools were established. 
Though these schools usually dealt only with religious subjects, in 
centres of learning they adopted extended courses of study and aimed at 
preparing Christian scholars and teachers who would be able to contend 
successfully with the heathen learning. Since the new faith stood in 
sharp contrast to the spirit and practice of the time, during the earlier 
period of its spread it was an object of hatred and persecution. Its 
adherents were outcasts from society and were compelled to conceal 
themselves and their worship. This persecution threw the early Christ- 
ians into opposition to the education given in established schools, and 
caused the training given their children to be narrow and one sided. 
Considering the salvation of the soul to be the chief end of life they 
ignored all studies which had not this end in view. 

This antagonism to secular learning however did not show itself 
to any great extent during the first two centuries of our era. Christian 
bishops and teachers had received the instruction of the heathen schools 
and, though always on their guard against hurtful influences, they 
advocated this instruction for the mental discipline it gave. But gradu- 
ally this liberal attitude toward heathen learning changed and in 398 A. 
D. the Fourth Council of Carthage formally forbade the reading of 
secular books even by the bishops. 

Although for a long time the Christian schools and the secular 
schools of the empire existed side by side, these secular schools having 
long before ceased to promote either the spiritual or the material inter- 
ests of men finally died out. The catechetical schools, which at first 
were intended only for religious teaching, took up the instruction of the 
laity in elementary branches thus entirely superseding the school of the 
Grammaticus. 

The asceticism of the age in the fourth century found fitting ex- 
pression in the monastic movement which was to be of great benefit to 
the West. The monasteries were retreats for men of piety and learning; 
they were examples of law and order in the midst of universal lawless- 
ness; they were inns for the traveler and pilgrim; they were dispensers 
of charity and founders of schools. As a part of their rule, in addition 



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to the daily round of prayer, the monasteries of the West required of 
their members some kind of work in farming, teaching or charity. St. 
Benedict laid upon his order the rule that every monk daily engage in 
some mental labor. Not only were the novices taught, but outsiders 
were admitted to the instruction. Though the courses consisted mainly 
of grammar and rhetoric and the instruction was poor, it marked the 
beginning of a new era. 

Besides the monastic schools which were intended mostly for the 
instruction of the priesthood, parochial schools were established in each 
parish for the common people. Here the youth were taught the 
elements of the Christian doctrine and were prepared for intelligent 
participation in the services of the church. These parochial schools 
corresponded to the catechetical schools of the early church. 

In the beginning of the twelfth century there was a general reviv- 
al of interest in learning caused by the influence of the crusades and also 
by the Moorish culture in Spain. Heretofore all education had been in 
the hands of the church. Now, in response to the general demand for 
knowledge and that of a more useful kind than was given by the church 
schools, there arose secular schools which were for the most part free 
from monastic influence. These burgher schools were established by 
the free cities to supply to the children of the trades-people and artisans 
practical training in the elements, reading, writing and arithmetic. 
Among the higher classes education was very meagre. The knight 
learned only the arts of war and politeness. As regards books he was 
proud of his ignorance considering learning as fit only for weaklings and 
priests. 

It was during this period that the modern university had its 
beginning. Accumulated knowledge in the leading studies made 
specialization necessary. Certain schools had long been famous for 
special branches; as Paris for theology, Salernum for medicine and 
Bologna for law. This specialization drew great numbers of students to 
these centres. Being self governing bodies, these schools were in 
advance of the monastic schools and to a great extent opposed to them. 

From this time on to the great revival of the sixteenth century, 
education and learning steadily advanced. The church which had been 
of so much service to learning during its darkest time, having now 
herself become narrow in her teaching and failing to advance as rapidly 
as the newly awakened energies of men demanded, lost forever her 



174 



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guiding power over men's thoughts and actions. The church did not 
willingly relinquish her power and it was not without a struggle that 
men freed themselves from her grasp. The Reformation was the final 
expression of this independence and was also the beginning of a new 
a nd better period in the history of education. 

"The Revival Thermometer**— A Review. 

Mr. William P. Pearce has just made another very valuable con- 
tribution to Christian literature in his recent work entitled "The Revival 
Thermometer" or "Gauging One's Spiritual Worth." Mr. Pearce is 
better known to many of you as the author of "The Tabernacle," "The 
Lover's Love" and "Stepping Stones to Manhood. 

When revivals are sweeping over both the Eastern and Western 
hemispheres with pentecostial power, the Revival Thermometer comes to 
us in a very opportune time; as A. C. Dixon says-in the introduction "It 
is an encouraging sign of the times that men who are not professional 
evangelists are writing books on evangelism. It is the result of the 
evangelistic atmosphere that fills the English speaking world, and it 
helps to make this atmosphere still more evangelistic." Perhaps no 
more practical question can be asked the Christian world today than; 
' ' What is a revival ? " To which the author replies that in a religious 
sense, it means the quickening and strengthening of spiritual life already 
possessed. It is not, and must not be confounded with regeneration. It 
becomes a means to an end — the awakening, revivifying, and reinvigor- 
ating of the Christian, the ultimate aim of which is the conversion of 
sinners, thus bringing the church to its normal condition. Every phase 
of revival work is treated in the most practical manner. Mr. Pearce has 
inserted very many illustrations drawn from all literature and everyday 
observation, thus making the work both interesting and instructive. 
The author reaches a climax in the last chapter when he calls attention 
to the masterly plan of Napoleon to defeat the Austrian army at Maren- 
go. Napoleon appears on the field in time to see his soldiers retreat, 
whereupon he commands the drummer boy to beat a retreat. The lad 
replied, "I do not know how." "I was never taught to beat a retreat, 
but I can beat a charge." "Beat a charge then" said the general. 
And immediately the lad grasped his drumsticks and beat "The old 



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i75 



charge of L,odi and the Pyramids." A moment later the soldiers were 
marching on to war and to victory, keeping step to the boy's drum. It 
was an awful charge, the dead piled up, but victory perched upon the 
banner of Napoleon. It is said, that when the smoke cleared away the 
boy was still marching on beating his famous and furious charge. From 
this illustration the author begs the church to "Beat the charge" and 
"Fight the good fight of faith," until, "the kingdoms of this world are 
become the kingdoms of our Lord and of his Christ." 

This brief work has just come from the press and is now published 
by The United Brethren Publishing House, Dayton, Ohio. 

A Visit, to an Annville Barber-shop. 

One day I visited the barber-shop at the Eagle Hotel and it was 
an experience I never forgot. When I went in, the barber was playing 
checkers. He never looked up from his game, but continued playing for 
about twenty minutes. When the game was finished he asked me what I 
wanted. I informed him that I desired a hair cut. According to 
custom, he asked me how much I desired taken off ; at the same time 
informing me that I could have five, ten or fifteen cents worth removed. 
Believing the average better than either extreme, I got into the chair 
and told him to take ten cents worth off. Smiling pleasantly, the tonsorial 
artist began his work. I have seen some funny things, but the sight of 
that little barber made me laugh. He had to get on his tip-toes when I 
was sitting up straight, so I raised up as far as I could. He politely 
requested me to "get a little down." At first, I thought he said " got a 
little down," referring to my beard, but I soon discovered what he 
meant. It took him about an hour to finish his task, but I wished it 
had been longer-but the most painful part of the operation was getting 
the neck shaved. Whether there was a water famine at that time I can- 
not say, but I know he gave me a " dry shave ". Fearing to offend him, 
I grinned and bore it-when it was over I felt all right, and the fun more 
than repaid me for my pain. 



176 



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Music and the Ministry. 

It is not probable that the work of the gospel ministry will be 
overestimated. Many ministers have not an adequate conception of the 
responsibilities which they have assumed, nor even of the rich gifts with 
which the Lord has endowed them. Many disappoint themselves and 
their friends, not because of any lack of application or consecration, but 
because they have not learned to make a consecrated use of what we may 
call their natural talents. It is as much the fault of the schools as of the 
scholars; for, when the young man has once chosen his profession, he 
determines to learn everything which the best authorities deem essential 
to the highest success in that calling. It is with keen regret that we 
notice that few of the seminaries esteem the subject of music important 
enough to give it a place in their curriculum, or even to discuss its his- 
tory and influence in any of their departments. One would naturally 
suppose that the professors of homiletics would give some lectures con- 
cerning it, or treat it in their published text-books; but they do not. 
Scarcely anything is said, except to guard against the slovenly or other- 
wise objectionable reading of the hymns in public worship. Important 
as that is, if the hymns are read, it leaves entirely out of view the 
relations which exist between the minister of the gospel and the "divine 
art." It is with the hope that the students for the ministry may be led 
to study this important subject for themselves, and to use all the opport- 
unities at their command, that this article is written. The main ques- 
tion is this: Is the study of music, (including both theory and practice,) 
sufficiently important to occupy the valuable time of the embryo theo- 
logian? We believe that every student who has the ministry in view 
should be as thorough a musician as his time and opportunities will per- 
mit; nor should he count himself ready for his work until he has acquired 
a reasonable degree of proficiency in this important branch of his 
•education. 

The following are some of the reasons suggested: 
I. For the sake of the art. Its source is a sufficient guarantee of 
its importance. It is the gift of God, more directly than any of the 
other arts. It has been vitally associated with his work ever since he 
had a people to worship him. The world does not dignify it by so much 
as a thought as to its source; but every master holds the conviction that 
it is God's richest gift, and that its highest glory is found in the worship 



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177 



of God. The world degrades it to baser ends; therefore, for the sake of 
the art, as well as for the sake of the giver, the church of God ought to 
maintain the purity of the art, and further its interests by every means 
in her power. What, then, is the duty of every minister? He should 
be the recognized and authoritative champion of this and every other art 
which is born to represent a phase of the truth, and which tends to 
ennoble and purify the human race. Its object demands for it the pro- 
foundest respect and love of every minister. Bach tells us that one of 
the noblest objects of music is the spread of religiou and the elevation of 
the human soul. Marx adds his testimony that the tendency of the art 
is to benefit the masses, and it cannot be without influence upon their 
moral and spiritual condition. 

I think we should look upon the art of music as a witness of God, 
and not as an enemy of religion. God is the source as well as the 
embodiment of all that which is beautiful, just as he is the source of all 
that which is pure and good. Art, therefore, is a glimpse of God. Its 
object is to lift us up, to refine us. Those that have the highest 
conception of the origin and utility of the art, and who are familiar with, 
its history and practical effects, assure us in every way that it is worth 
the study of the minister, and that it should have his help in order that 
it may hold its rightful place as a blessing to humanity and a helpful 
factor in his religion. Every minister should stand for the purest, the 
most worshipful, the most consecrated art which can be introduced into 
public worship. Even a slight investigation will show that that is not 
art which has crept in to corrupt the true worship of God. With intelli- 
gent ministers guarding the sacred portals, such "stuff" never could have 
a hearing; and with proper care the sentiment will prevail which will 
make it impossible to sing the hymns of the church in such a manner and 
at such times as to destroy their sacredness. Let us all study music till 
we know whence it is, what it is, and what it will do. The very best 
service is not too good for God; anything less than the best is an imper- 
fect service. If this "divine art" ever loses its place as the most helpful 
and inspiring of all arts, the fault can properly be laid at the door of the 
church of Christ, which will mean that her ministers have not been 
faithful guardians of her rarest treasures. 

II. For the sake of the man. The minister is a man, first, last, 
and all the time; not simply a scholar, not an essayist, nor a homilist, 
nor a theologian, but a live, robust man. Others will forget this fact, 



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but he should not. They will overlook the fact that he has physical, 
mental, and spiritual needs, identical with their own. The needs of any 
man are the needs of a minister. He needs pure and pleasant recreation, 
and woe unto that man who neglects -these freshening influences. There 
is no shorter road to the valley of dry bones. Montesquieu says, "It is 
the only one of all the arts that does not corrupt the mind." He needs 
a stimulant, and there is none better, in the home, in the study, or in 
the pulpit than music. Disraeli says that it is a stimulant to mental 
exertion, and every one who has felt its influence knows that it does 
stimulate to the best work. The Greeks held that music gives strength 
to the soul as gymnastics do to the body; and Plato was not insensible to 
its influence, for he said, "Music, that perfect model of elegance and 
precision, was not given by the immortal gods with the sole view of 
delighting and pleasing the senses, but rather for appeasing the troubles 
of their souls." The minister is the man of all men who needs the high- 
est culture of which the human mind is capable. The inability to 
appreciate the classics, whether musical or literary, is almost sure to 
brand a man as uncouth and uneducated, for here are the best thoughts 
of the world's greatest and best men. Here are the vocalized thoughts 
and feelings of some of the deepest natures who have offered homage to 
God. Shall we fail to covet for ourselves such a fellowship? But the 
deepest needs of any man are the needs of his soul. He wants the 
powers of his soul developed and brought in close sympathy with the 
souls of others. Here is the true soul-language. It is the record in 
harmony of the highest delights of those souls who have caught some- 
thing of the harmony of the skies. Cannot understand it? No, of course 
not! Neither can we understand the sublime flights of Milton, nor 
appreciate the deep and critical analysis of Shakespeare, nor the full 
value of the simplest words of the Savior, nor even the sweet confidence 
and unwavering faith of the lovely aged Christian, who amazes us when 
she tells us what deep secrets her dim eyes have seen, of things in earth 
and in heaven. We can never understand any of these things till we 
have studied them; till we think their thoughts after them, and key up 
our lives into harmony with theirs. Men are too matter-of-fact in this 
age. We need our emotional natures developed proportionately with the 
mind and body. Nothing finds the seat of emotions, awaking and guid- 
ing them, as does this art. Dr. Haweis says: "As the study of Euclid 
trains the mind in the abstract, so the study of music trains the emotions 



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179 



in the abstract. If you want to touch and train this emotional life, 
music is your all-powerful ally." The most frequent appeals of the 
minister must be made to the emotions. It is the appeal of heart to 
heart, of the trained and cleansed heart to the wayward and impure one. 
In order to deal successfully with other men, and lead their hearts God- 
ward, we must be susceptible to every influence which deepens our 
emotional natures and soothes our wildest passions. Next to the Word 
of God, nothing can affect us as music. Truly the man needs the art 

for his own sake. 

III. For the sake of his profession. Pericles, the great Athenian, 
when about to make an address, was accustomed to say to himself, 
"Pericles, remember that you are going to speak to Greeks, to free men." 
While he' was conscious of the important place which he occupied, yet he 
was wise enough to use every art which contributed to his power, and 
enabled him to make the desired impression on their minds. Why 
should not the Christian minister learn wisdom from the earth's wise 
ones? Why should he not make every legitimate art tributary to that 
most noble calling of all? His work is the most sacred and solemn to 
which any man can be called. Its labors are arduous, its responsibilities 
awful, its motives sublime, its spirit Christ-like, and its fruits eternal. 
Entering its domain, one should go cautiously, for he treads on holy 
ground, which is marked with blood-stained feet and consecrated by a 
divine sacrifice. For all that, it is a work which the Master himself 
committed to the hands of self-denying men for the salvation of the 
whole race. At the same time, the best success generally attends the 
use of the best means; hence education enters largely into the equipment 
for this work. Thus, history, literature, sciences, and arts all become 
tributary to the work of the gospel ministry. 

Does the church acknowledge the art of music as an important 
factor in her work? She answers for herself. 

"In singing praises to God we are to sing with the spirit and with 
the understanding also; making melody in our hearts to the Lord." It 
is also proper that we cultivate some knowledge of the rules of music, 
that we may praise God in a becoming manner, with our voices as well 
as with our hearts. The proportion of the time of public worship to be 
spent in singing is left to the prudence of every minister; but it is recom- 
mended that more time be allowed for this excellent part of divine service 
than has been usual in most of our churches. 



i8o 



THE FORUM 



Of course there is a wide difference of opinion as to what that 
proportion shall be. Some hold that the sermon is the most important 
feature of public worship, and that the other parts are intrusions, suffer- 
ed to remain for the sake of the custom which has been handed down to 
us from our fathers. True enough, God has put the seal of blessing on 
the preaching of his word, and the sermon is properly looked upon as the 
main feature of the service; yet we must not dishonor the other means of 
grace by unduly exalting this. The other extremists hold that the 
preaching is not, in itself, sufficiently attractive to draw the people, and, 
as Christianity is for the masses, they must depend on something else to 
bring in the crowds so the preacher can get a chance at them. Hence 
they exalt the other features, and dishonor the preaching. The truth is 
found between these, but far above them. Every part of the public 
service is recognized in our standards as a means of grace, and is proper- 
ly entitled to be called worship. In this summary they include preach- 
ing, praying, praising, and paying. To omit one, or seem to regard it 
as non-essential, will surely weaken all. Some one has said: "Worship 
aims at expression; preaching aims at impression. The noblest sermon 
cannot do all. Neither can the busiest church. 'Let the people praise 
thee, O Lord, let all the people praise thee' — these words call for wor- 
ship. That we have failed here is only too evident. We have not given 
to the congregation a fitting opportunity for vocal expression. The 
musical and devotional parts of the services we have done too much by 
proxy, and then we have wondered why the people, unused to any 
exertion, have not responded promptly to the claims of the contribution- 
box. Train the congregation to sing, to pray, to read, to respond, and 
you will train them to give. The services will be done by them, not for 
them. No other agency, however, can usurp the place of the sermon." 
The services of God's house, from the first sound of the organ to the 
benediction, should be a harmonious whole, blending all parts so natur- 
ally that no one can question the fitness of any. The minister, though 
always a man, is always a messenger. He has but one message, and 
that is the old, old story. To tell that story most effectively, he needs 
all the help he can receive. That art which was so prominent in the 
Jewish church, and developed so grandly under its noblest kings; which 
filled the earth with the glad message of the Savior's birth; which formed 
the last link of worship binding together the hearts of the disciples and 
their Lord, ere he went out to Gethsemane; which wakes the pentecostal 



THE FORUM 



181 



harmonies in the hearts and homes of all Germany, and which is even 
yet the honored means ofjcarrying truth to heathen hearts — that art is 
the one which we want you to study. But the minister is more than a 
messenger; he is the priest of God, standing officially before the people 
to lead them properly and devotionally in all their worship. He never 
should assume such a responsibility unless sure that he is qualified for 
it. Who can decide what is a worshipful hymn or tune, unless he has 
studied the art? No organist is so faithful, no chorister so prudent, no 
choir so angelic that the minister can afford to leave in their hands the 
entire selection of the music. He is the responsible head, and should be 
proficient enough in the art to appreciate the best, to select the most 
fitting, and thus hold the sympathies and command the respect of the 
hoir. They should have a wholesome fear of his critical judgment. A 
"medley" which links together "Listen to the mocking bird," "Nearer, 
my God, to thee," "Little Annie Rooney," and "America" is a mon- 
strosity which no true musician can hear without a nervous chill. But 
it is not much worse than some combinations of so-called sacred music 
which find a place in the house of God with the pastor's sanction, or, at 
least, without his protest. An inappropriate hymn after the sermon may 
dispel all the good impressions made, by diverting the minds of the 
hearer from the central thought; while an appropriate hymn will deepen 
the impression, fasten the thought, and at the same time harmonize, as 
it were, the melody to which the discourse was set. The hymns should 
be selected with the same care used in selecting the text. 

It is one service, for one purpose, under the direction of one man; 
why, then, should it not be a unit, from first to last? Next to the Bible, 
the minister should be familiar with his hymn-book and with the hymns 
of every age. It will insure a prompt and wise selection of hymns for 
worship, will give a valuable and inexhaustible fund of appropriate 
quotations, and will increase his own personal piety remarkably. A 
prominent pastor in Chicago has wrought a complete change in his style 
of preaching through a careful and devotional study of Faber's hymns. 
From a style that was keen, critical, and sarcastic enough, at times, to 
seem heartless, he has changed to a style so tender and sympathetic that 
he has increased his power many fold. Surely every minister, coming 
as he must into the sacred confidences of the hearts and homes under his 
care, ought to acquire, if he has not naturally, a heart which, like 
Christ's, can be touched with a feeling of their infirmities. There are 



182 



THE FORUM 



no passions so intense and powerful as the passions born of Christian 
faith; hence the best songs are the songs of the church. Infidelity has 
no music. One must feel before he can sing, and where there is no faith 
there is little or no feeling. Clearly it is the duty of every minister to 
become thoroughly familiar with this art. He should love, honor, and 
use it, because it was such a feature in the service of the Jewish church; 
because it was carried over from that into the Christian church by Christ 
and his disciples; because it gives the most accurate record concerning 
the struggles and triumphs of Christian faith in all ages. The songs of 
faith, hope, and love are ringing in the ears and cheering the hearts of 
all Christendom to-day, and he who sees the vision of the heavenly city 
finds its air all vibrant with the song of Moses and the Lamb. 

There are signs of a new era. The church is demanding better 
music, and publishers and authors are aiming to supply the demand. 
The magazines are noting a new interest, for they are treating the sub- 
ject more thoroughly than ever before, and the schools, setting their 
standards as high as possible, are pushing on to that day of new delights, 
of broader culture, of firmer faith, and purer worship. Let us devoutly 
thank God for its past, but much more for its future; for, in all these 
events, we see 

" The tides of music's golden sea 
" Setting toward eternity." 

This much by way of conclusion : The art needs the man; the 
man needs the art, and the church needs both, in their fullest develop- 
ment. Neglect the art, and you neglect one of the richest and most 
fruitful gifts of God. Fail to use it, and you omit one of the most 
potent factors in the dissemination of the truth, next to the Word itself. 
Surely the priests in the temple should be the last to divorce the two 
handmaids, religion and music. Together in the wilderness, together in 
the promised land, together at the coming of Christ, together at the last 
supper, together at the reformation, together in every revival of religion, 
and wherever the story of the Cross is told, together eternally in the 
church above, we may well say, What God hath joined together let no 
man cast asunder. 

Lebanon Valley College, Pennsylvania. 



THE FORUM 183 

THE FORUM. 



Vol. XVIII. MAY, 1905. No. 8 



Editor-in-Chief, 

MERLE M. HOOVER, '06. 

Associate Editors, 

RAY G. LIGHT, '06 JOHN C. RUPP, '06 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS '. 
ETHEL MYERS, '07 ERMA SHUPE, '08 

EDWARD E. KNAUSS, '07 M. O. BILLOW, '08 

Business Managers t 

C. E. shenk, '06, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 

M. O. SNYDER, 'o6 C. RAY BENDER, '07 



The Foeum is published each month during the college year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

TERMS :— Subscription Price, 50 cents a Year. Single Copy, 10 cents. 

All business matter should be addressed to The Forum, Annville, Pa. ; all literary matter to 
Merle M. Hoover, Annville, Pa. 

Once a subscriber, always a subscriber, until notice for discontinuance, accompanied with all 
arrearages, has been received. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville. Pa., as second-class mail matter. 



Editorial. 

THE trouble growing out of the hazing of a Freshman by a band 
of Sophomores at a nearby college in which a Sophomore was shot has 
again caused widespread discussion of the subject of hazing. Hazing is 
a peculiar outgrowth of our college life and of the so called ' ' college 
ethics ' ' and can be discussed in various phases. There is no greater 
blot upon the English college and university life than the system of 
"fagging" and everyone looks with scorn upon it, no matter what 
arguments are presented in its defense. To force a student to perform 
tasks usualy considered menial, simply because he belongs to a lower 
class or form does not appeal to our American sense of fairness and 
justice. We do not know whether the American system of hazing is 
descended from the English system of fagging or not, but hazing as it is 
carried on in some instiutions is equally as unjust and unfair as any to be 



THE FORUM 



found in the English schools. Hazing is a relic of barbarism and when 
carried on to the extreme causes very harmful results. 

We can congratulate ourselves that hazing in even a harsh form 
is entirely wanting in our college life here at Lebanon Valley. The 
hazing here has always been in a mild form and there have been no 
evils resulting from it. To the best of our knowledge no one has ever 
been hazed here because he belonged to any particular class. The 
hazings, which have been but seldom, were carried on by a band of 
" regulators " in which each class was represented and no student was 
treated harshly or uujustiy by them. Cases neglected by the college 
authorities were brought before the band and every man so brought 
before them was given a fair trial and was punished accordingly. We 
believe it is the opinion of the majority of our student body that the 
results were only beneficial. 

The fact that hazing in its harsher forms is entirely lacking in our 
college life here speaks well for the high moral tone of the present 
student body and of our institution in general. 

* * * 

The proposition from Otterbein University for a joint debate 
with Lebanon Valley brings before us a matter which demands immediate 
consideration. It is time that our student body recognizes the fact that 
buildings alone do not make a college. The work of the students should 
be the best advertisement of a college. This work should be thorough 
a nd earnest and should partake of every phase of active, energetic 
college life. It must include more than the work done in the class room 
or study ; it must be done by the various athletic teams and by every 
other organization that is connected with a good college. During the 
past few years Lebanon Valley has been building up a reputation in 
athletics, and sends forth teams to compete with those of other colleges 
of her class which are worthy representatives. 

But Lebanon Valley should not be content to contest for suprem- 
acy in athletics alone. She should be in a position to claim recognition 
from other colleges in inter-collegiate debates. There are many students 
who can not hope to gain places upon her athletic teams. Many of these 
students would be willing to contest for places upon a team to represent 
the College in debate. The time has came for Lebanon Valley to come 



THE FORUM 



185 



in touch with other colleges on the floor, and an opportunity is now 
offered. If the effort is made to organize an association now and prepare 
plans for work when the Fall term opens it may meet with success. 
Everything depends upon the students. There will be many difficulties 
to overcome, but if the students are willing the faculty will give every 
aid possible. Students, awake, and show our friends that Lebanon 
Valley means progress along every line. 

* * * 

During the past year many notable and necessary improvements 
have been made to strengthen the efficiency of the College. One of the 
most useiul, and one that was badly needed, is the new Carnegie Library 
which will be dedicated during commencement week. This beautiful gift 
of the great philanthropist is much appreciated. But, beautiful as the 
gift may be, it now rests with the friends of the College to make it 
useful. Many books are needed to make the Library what it should be ; 
but great care must be taken in selecting the volumes to be placed on its 
shelves. It is very evident to the students who are required to do 
reference work or reading what the defects are. It must be very 
annoying to a teacher to find that work in the reading of literary produc- 
tions is two weeks behind the scheduled time. It is impossible for a 
class of twenty to so regulate their reading that the books needed are 
always available, especially when only one or two works are available. 
There should be at least fonr available volumes of every standard work 
of literature. Aside from this, the important works in history, science, 
political and social economy should be available, and especially the newer 
and more up-to-date material. A systematic effort is needed, 
and if provision is made by the College authorities, supported by its 
friends, our Library will be more useful. 

ST 

College Notes. 

"The Merchant of Venice" will be given by school talent on June 
10, under the direction of Profs. Schlichter and Jackson. 

Rev. Geo. A. Funkhouser, D. D., president of the Union Biblical 
Seminary, on the morning of April 18 gave a short address in chapel. 
In the evening he addressed the students' prayer meeting. 



i86 



THE FORUM 



The Sophomore Baseball schedules are attractive in appearance as 
well as useful. 

Prof. McFadden's Lecture on "The Photography of Invisible" in 
the U. B. Church on April 27 was largely attended. 

The first aunual outing of the Biological Field Club was held at 
Penryn on May 13. The day was almost an ideal one for such a trip. 
Many new specimens of flowers and butterflies were secured. The day 
was also a success socially. 

Pres. and Mrs. Roop gave a reception to the students, faculty and 
local alumni on the night of April 22. The Glee Club sang a few 
selections, which were enjoyed by all. The reception was one of the 
most pleasant ever given here. 

The second division of the Freshman Elocution Class gave a 
public entertainment in the lecture room of the Library building on May 
8. The programme consisted of recitations, dialogues, orations, a panto- 
mime and several musical numbers. 

The new buildings are being pushed forward rapidly. The found- 
ations for the New Administration Building and the Boy's Dormitory 
are almost completed. The Ladies' Hall has reached the third story 
and will be under roof before long. Work has been renewed on the 
Brightbill Gymnasium. 

The Carnegie Library was opened to the students on April 17. 
Although not quite completed, the contractors agreed to leave the var- 
nishing of the floors go until after the close of the term because there 
was no other place for a reading room, the old library room being used 
as a class room for the Normal Department. 

Dr. and Mrs. Roop entertained the Junior Class on Thursday eve- 
ning April 20, at their home on College Avenue. The evening was very 
pleasantly spent in playing games of various kinds. Following the 
serving of refreshments they gathered around the piano and sang several 
College songs. After giving their class yell with three cheers for Dr. 
and Mrs. Roop, the class departed very highly pleased with the evening's 
entertainment. 



THL FORUM 



187 



Base Ball. 

The following are the results of the base ball games played so far 



this season with the summaries of home games. L. V. Opp 

April 7, St. Mary's College at Emmittsburg 4 5 

April 8, Gettysburg at Gettysburg 1 10 

April 15, Indians at Annville 3 1 

April 19, Mercersburg at Mercersburg o 13 

April 22, Felton A. C. at Annville 11 2 

April 25, Penn Park at York o 1 

April 29, Indians at Carlisle 2 17 

May 6, Gettysburg at Annville 4 10 

May 11, Susquehanna at Selin's Grove 2 7 

May 13, Bucknell at Lewisburg o 9 



Although the team has lost the majority of its games yet there is 
no reason to become discouraged. The team is badly in need of pitchers 
and are also handicapped by not having a coach to train them. 

The second team played their first game of the season with the 
Harrisburg High School at Harrisburg on May 14. The game was 
called off in the ninth inning on account of rain, the score standing a tie 
at four points. 

The second team was defeated at Lebanon, May 6, by the Leba- 
non Juniors in a close and exciting game. The final result was 12 to 10. 

On May 13, the second team defeated Harrisburg High School. 
The score was a tie from the eight inning until the eleventh when Leba- 
non Valley brought in one run. The final score was 9-8. 

The following are the box scores of the games played at Annville 
so far this season : 



Indians 1 ; L. V. C. 3. 



Lebanon Valley 


R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


R. 


Indians 


R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Miller 2b 


1 


2 


5 


I 


O 


Jude 3b 





1 





O 





Shenk 3b 





2 


3 


O 


O 


Mitchell ss. 











2 





Pauxtis c 








10 


2 


O 


Gardner r. f. 





2 


1 


O 


O 


Barnhart ib 


1 


1 


7 


O 


1 


Nephew ib 








10 


O 


O 


Neary r. f. 











O 


O 


Lubo 1. f. 





1 


4 


I 





Hendricks c. f. 











O 


O 


Youngdeer c. f. 


1 


1 





O 


I 



THE FORUM 



Lichtv 1 f 





r 


1 


r\ 
\J 


I 


Oldham ss. 








1 


2 


j 


Marhiirp'^r n 


j 


2 





T 

I 


I 


Totals 




8 


27 


fy 
\J 


4 


Lebanon Valley 












1 


Indians 



















Felton 


A. 


C. 


L. V. C. 


R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Pauxtis c 


2 


2 


9 


I 





- Shen k 3b 


2 


3 


4 


I 





Barnhart ib 


I 


I 


1 r 


O 


O 


Buck 2b 


O 


I 





4 





Neary r. f. 


2 


2 


1 





O 


Hendricks p 


1 


2 





4 





Oldham ss. 


O 


I 





2 


2 


Hatz c. f. 


I 


I 


1 





O 


Guyer 1. f. 


2 


3 


1 





O 


Totals 


I I 


16 


27 


12 


2 


Lebanon Valley 


I 









5 


reiton A. c 


O 







I 






Gettysburg 1 


L. V. C. 


R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Pauxtis c 


O 


O 


10 


O 


I 


A. Shenk 3b 


£ 


2 


r 


3 


O 


Buck 2b 


O 


I 


5 


3 


2 


Barnhart ss. 


O 


I 


1 


2 


O 


Neary ib 


O 


2 


6 


1 


O 


Burke r. f. 


O 


O 


1 





O 


Hendricks c. f. 


I 


O 


3 





O 


Oldham 1. f. 


I 


2 





1 


2 


Marburger p 


O 


O 








O 


J. Shenk p 


I 


I 





1 


O 


Totals 


4 


9 


27 


1 1 


5 


L. V. C. 















Gettysburg 


3 


.2 




1 





T ihhv oY\ 
1^1 \j\jy £ u 





O 


O 


1 


2 


JicllIU c 





O 


9 





1 


Roy p 
















Totals 


a I 


5 


24 


1 


4 


O T T 
KM I 1 


KJ 





X 




~3 


000 


I 










— i 


L. V. C. 11. 












Felton A. C. 




H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Curran 1. f. 


O 


O 





O 


C 


Dickinson r. f. 


O 


O 


1 


O 


O 


Strickler 2b 


O 


O 


5 


3 


I 


Boyd c 


O 


O 


7 


3 


O 


Reel ib 


O 


2 


9 





O 


Wadley c. f. 


O 


O 





1 


O 


Megary ss. 


I 


O 





5 


O 


Holtzberg 3b 


O 


O 


2 


2 


I 


Houseman p 


I 


2 





2 


I 


Totals 


2 


4 


24 


16 


3 



3 O I I O X — II 
OOOOI O 2 



; L. V. C. 4. 












Gettysburg 


R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Sieber 2b 


O 


O 


6 


I 


O 


James ss. 


3 


I 





3 


I 


Kauffman p 


3 


2 





6 


I 


Thomas r. f. 





O 


3 





O 


Van Zandt ib 


1 


2 


10 





I 


Lantz 3b 


2 


4 


1 





O 


Black c. f. 


1 


4 


1 





O 


Lewis c 





1 


6 


2 


O 


Heinz 1. f. 





2 








O 


Totals 


10 


16 


27 


12 


3 


000 







3 




-10 


1 2 1 












"4 



THE FORUM 



189 



Society Notes. 

The K. E. S. officers elected for this term are as follows : Pres., 
J. W. Kaufmann; Vice Pres., C. A. Fry; Rec. Sec, R. E. Morgan; Cor. 
Sec, I. J. McKendrick; Critic, P. M. Spangler; Censor, V. A. Arndt; 
Chaplain, J. F. Miller; Treas., C. E. Shenk; Ed. of Examiner, E. E. 
Knauss; Pianist, E. E. Eudwick; Sar. at Arms, S. R. Oldham. 

The K. E. S. celebrated their twenty-eighth anniversary in the 
college auditorium on April 14, 1905. The hall was tastefully decorated 
with the society colors red and old gold. The following programme was 
rendered : Invocation, W. J. Zuck, D.D.; March— Battle of the Giants, 
(J. J. Scull;) President's Address, J. W. Kaufmann; Overture — Fauchon 
(Isenman;) Oration — Triumphs of Public Opinion, V. A. Arndt; Oration 
—Governor Pennypacker and the Press, E. E. Erb; Selection — Martha 
(Flotow;) Essay — The Importance of the State, J. C. Rupp; Organ Solo 
Sposalizio (Eiszt) I. J. McKendrick; Honorary Oration — Opportunity, 
Rev. A. E. Shroyer, '00; Goodbye, Eittle Girl, Goodbye — (Edwards;) 
Music by Kalo Orchestra. After the rendition of the programme a 
reception was held in the society hall. 

A large and appreciative audience was present at the thirty-eighth 
anniversary of the P. L. S. on May 5, 1905. An excellent programme 
was rendered after which a reception was held in the Carnegie Eibrary. 
The programme : Invocation, Prof. E. F. John; Piano Solo Ee Harpe 
Eolienne E. A. Faus; President's Address, T. H. Kreider; Philo Chorus 
—The Feller With the Drum; Oration— The American Viper, G. I. 
Rider; Oration— Put Beauty Into Your Eife, G. D. Owen; Solo— My 
Dreams (F. Fosti) A. R. Spessard; Eulogy— George F. Hoar, A. R. 
Clippinger; Essay— The Man of Toil, P. E. Mathias; Quartet— Tell Her 
I Love Her So (Macy) H. E. Spessard, P. E. Mathias, A. R. Spessard. 
R. E. Engle; Reading— Demetrius, (Runcie) T. B. Beatty; Chorus — 
Marching (H. Trotere;) 

Messrs. Morgan and Sprecher won the first and second prizes 
respectively in an original story contest held by the K. E. S. May 12. 
The following were the contestants : Messrs. Ray Light, Shenk, 
McKendrick, Miller, Morgan and Sprecher. 



190 



THE FORUM 



Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. 

The reception to the new students under the auspices of the Young 
Women's and Young Men's Christian Associations was held on April 15. 
It was one of the largest Students' reception ever held here. The eve- 
ning was passed in conversation interspersed with music. Refreshments 
were served during the evening and everybody went home saying they 
enjoyed a very delightful evening. 

The Y. W. C. A. delegates to Silver Bay, N. Y., were elected 
Misses King, Knaub, and Myers. The convention will be held between 
June 23 and July 4. 

The delegates chosen to represent the local Y. M. C. A. at North- 
field, Mass., areas follows: J. B. Showers, P. F. Esbenshade, M. M. 
Hoover and A. W. Herrman with A. B. Brackbill as alternate. The 
convention will last from June 30 to July 9, 1905. 

X X 
Personals. 

Miss Josephine Strickler, '06, of Irving College, spent Saturday, 
April 15, with Miss Gensemer. 

Among those who spent Easter away from College were : Misses 
Gensemer, King, Knaub and Enders, Messrs. Hambright, Rojahn, 
Linebaugh, Knauss and Kaufmann. 

Miss Louise Rodeneiser, of Hagerstown, spent Easter with Miss 
Garlock. 

Miss Mengel, of Pinegrove, was the guest of Miss Gensemer for a 
few days. 

Mrs. Henry and Mrs. H. W. Basehore, both of Mt. Wolf, were 
the guests of the Misses Wolf on April 30. 

The following visitors were present at Philo Anniversary : 

Misses Spayd and Zug, of Lebanon; Misses Weber and Shapley, of 
Mechanicsburg; and Messrs. Holtzinger and Dellinger, of Red Lion. 

Mrs. C. W. Enders, of Elizabethville, spent a few days with her 
daughter, Miss Laura A. Enders. 



THE FORUM 



191 



Lecture by Prof. Schlichter. 

Professor Schlichter gave a lecture on Moliere on May 16 in the 
Carnegie Library. Prof. McFadden made a fine collection of lantern 
slides which were used to illustrate scenes from the plays, and so forth. 
Moliere was characterized as the greatest comic dramatist of all time, 
and his work and life was contrasted with that of Shakespeare in an 
effective way. The readings illustrating his comic methods were from 
five of his best known plays. These readings threw valuable light on 
the life of the times of Louis XIV and were valuable to students of 
literature and history alike. The lecture was given under the auspices 
of the Y. M. C. A. This was Prof. Schlichter's first public lecture on a 
French subject. He intends to translate and read several French plays 
during the coming year. 

Alumni Notes. 

Important ! Don't forget to come to the Alumni Banquet and 
Rally on Tuesday evening, June 13. 

Rev. A. E. Shroyer, 'oo, delivered the honorary oration at the 
twenty-eighth anniversary of the Kalozetean Literary Society, April 15. 
On Sunday May 14, Rev. Shroyer preached in the U. B. Church in 
Annville. 

Among the alumni visiting in Annville and the College during the 
last month were : Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Shroyer, '00, of Highspire; 
Joseph Kreider, '02, of Yale University; Thomas Miller, '01, of New 
York City; Alfred Mills, '04, of Yale University; and William Grum- 
bine, '04, of Reading. 

Prof. H. E. Enders, '97, has been elected a member of the Phi 
Betta Kappa chapter of John Hopkins University. 

Mrs. Gertrude Bowman Wright, '02, is the happy mother of a 
young son. 

Joseph Kreider, '02, has been elected a member of a new scientific 
society formed at Yale. 

William C. Arnold, '03, of Columbia University, contributed an 
unusually suggestive article on "Our Church Schools" to a recent num- 
ber of The Telescope. 

Rev. Chas. H. Fisher, '04, of Union Theological Seminary, will 
spend the summer at Battle Creek, Mich. 



192 



THE FORUM 



Exchange Notes. 

The Vassar Miscellany contains two excellent articles on "Modern 
Librarianship and Its Significance," and "The Present Question of 
Church and State in France." It is one of our best exchanges. 

The Pharetia contains a number of crisp stories, and its editorials 
and college notes are well written. It is a very artistic paper. 

"Oxford and Rhodes Scholars" is the subject of a fine article in 
The College Student. "Superstitions about the Weather" is interesting. 

The best that can be said about The Sketch Book is that it has an 
artistic cover. 

The Criterion, dainty in gold and white, contains a tender little 
poem entitled "To G." 

The College Folio appears in a charming cover of rose and gold. 

"A Lyric of Quickening Life" is an excellent poem in the April 
Otterbein Aegis which is a basket ball number. 

The Amulet and The Normal School Herald each contains a number 
of poems which are not original. We hardly see the wisdom of filling 
up the pages with these when original ones would be of greater interest 
to the students. 

The "Sheaf of Lyrics" in the Emerson College Magazine is very 

fine. 

We acknowledge, with pleasure, the receipt of the following : 

The Jeff erson ia n, The Collegian, The Lesbian Herald, The Dickinsonian, 
The Delaware College Review, The Susquehanna, The Albright Bulletin, 
Maryland Collegian, State Collegian, Juniata Echo, The Comenian, 
Ursinus Weekly, The Skirmisher, Ths Hedding Graphic, The Muhlen- 
berg, The Mirror, The Western Independent, and The Gates Index. 



Dr. Roop attended during the month the commencement exercises 
of the Union Biblical Seminary at Dayton and the General Conference of 
the United Brethren Church at Topeka, Kansas. 



THE FORUM 



193 



A Picturesque Tramp. 

There are several species of the tramp genus, I will attempt to 
describe the " Weary Willie " variety, as I remember him. We see him 
coming slowly down the shady side of the street, carefully watching for 
" Beware of the Dog " sign. Now he comes to a house which looks 
inviting, opens the gate and saunters carelessly around the walk to the 
back door. When the good lady opens the door, she sees a sight both 
wonderful and strange. Our subject is attired in an old Prince Albert 
coat, with one lonely button on the front, and two in the rear where they 
can be of no use ; a shirt that confirms the rumor of a water famine, 
tucked into a pair of trousers that might have been worn by Napoleon; 
and two shoes, varying greatly in size and age, fastened with pieces of 
twine. He raises his smiling face, adorned with a nine days' growth of 
beard, removes his covering, ( it can be hardly called a hat ) and says, 
" Leddy, will you be so kind as to give an unfortunate man, a bite to 
eat? I have tasted nothing for three days." Touched with pity for 
suffering humanity, the good woman provides him with an excellent 
meal. As he eats, she watches him and observes, that " Solomon in all 
his glory was not arrayed like one of these." After devouring huge 
quantities of food and washing it down with several cups of coffee, he 
thanks her for her kindness. Wiping his face with his red bandanna he 
dons his lid, and with a fervent " Heaven bless you," saunters down the 
walk, carefully closes the gate, and, smacking his lips with an air of 
satisfaction and independence, goes to seek the friendly shade of some 
tree for his siesta. 



Rensselaer \ 

^Polytechnic'^ 

Q '*&n institute, 
e % Troy, N.Y. 

local examination b nrovided for. Send for a Catalogue 

W. J. Baltzeil, Class '84, 

Managing Editor of 

THE ETUDE, Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Leadins 



Musical Magazine in the United 
States, 



William H. Kreider 

CLASS OP 1891 

Attorney-at-Law 

S. E. Cor. Broad and Chestnut Sts., 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



Standard Steam Laundry and 

Scouring (Uorks, 
27 n. 7 Street, Eebanon, Pa, 

ALLEN F. WARD, Class of 1890, Prop. 

Prompt and Good Service Given. 



THE FORUM. 

TJhe Charm of Sndi'viduality 

9// arks evert/ portrait produced 6y 

Safes' Stud jo 




142 IfortA 8th Street, 



0/scount to Students. 



jCebanon, iPenn'a. 

Spec/at Spates to Ciasses. 



FOR THE LATEST 
AND BEST IN , , . 



HATS 



And MEN'S 
FURNISHINGS 



to Erb & Craumer 



777 Cumb. St„ 



LEBANON 



$♦ nt SbenK's 
Bakery 

Has always on hand 

Jmb Bread, CaKe$ ana Rolls 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

One door west of Pennsylvania House. 



R Complete fllusie Stoi*e 

PIANOS, - - - ORGANS, 
VIOLINS, - GUITARS, - MANDOLINS, 
BANJOS, SHEET MUSTC and BOOKS. 

Musical Goods of all kinds at Lowest Prices. 
Phonographs and Graphophones from $io to $50. 
15,000 Edison and Columbia Records to select from. 

fllillet* Organ and Piano Co. 

738 Cumberland St., LiEBA^OfJ, PA. 

FACTORYx-Eighth and maple Sts. 




Jacob Sargent, 

merchant f ailpr 

STYLE, FIT and WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED. 



is-20 01. main $t., Enmnlle. 



IF IN WANT OF 

Books, Stationery, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, FINE WRITING 
PAPER, FANCY GOODS, ALBUMS 
TOILET CASES, CALENDARS, CARDS 
GAMES, PURSES, HOLIDAY GOODS 
or anything kept in an up't<vd;ite Book 
Store, call or write 

D. P. Witmeyer's Book Store, 

21 S. 8ih St., LEBANON, PA. 



THE 



FORUM 



Kodaks, Cameras 
and Supplies 
Pictures 
and Picture Frames 



8th and Willow Sis., EBANON 
My Specialties Are 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

AND 

CORRECTING VISUAL DEFECTS 




WANTED 



Having thoroughly learned both professions, can 
give the same practical service received in large 
cities. EYES EXAMINED FREE. 

D. B. SHIFFER, 

WEST MAIN STREET. ANNVILLE, PA. 

L. W. SHAY 

Candies, Nuts, Fruits 

OYSTERS 
IN EVERY STYLE 

A few agents for 
Annville and the Col- 
lege, the best seller out, every student 
must have it. Address 

C. S. ROSHON, 
34N.jrd.St., HARRISBURG, Pa. 

H. H. KREIDER. JOHN E. HERR 



"I 

CONTRACTORS 
and BUILDERS. 

Coal, Grain, Seed, Salt, 
and Lumber. 

Office and Yards on Railroad St., 
Telephone ANNVILLE. 



Jf. H. SMITH 



L. G. BOWMAN 



Smith & Bowman, 

Successors to A. C. Zimmerman & Co. 
Dealers In 

Carpets, Rugs, Mattings, 
Draperies. 



Carpets Lifted, Cleaned and Re-Laid 
at the Lowest Prices. 



768 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



50 YEARS' 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
Invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
yeur; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNM & Co, 36,Broadwa y- New York 

Branch Office. 625 F St* Washington, D. C. 



J¥. Shaucl, 

Dealer in 

Watches and jewelry 



J'ine Candies and bruits. 

A full line of 
& oss C/l0C0lat0S Downey 



THE FORUM. 



Oldest Established Stand in Lebanon. 

J. H. SHUGAR'5 
SONS & CO. 
-^GROCERS 

623-25 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PA. 




Complete Encyclopedia ot Amateur Sport 

Spalding's 

official 

Athlet i G 
Almanac 

For 1905 
Edited by J. E. SULLIVAN 

( Chief of Department of Physical Culture, 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition). 

Should be read by every college student, as it 
contains the records of all college athletes and 
all amateur events in this country and abroad. 

It also contains a complete review of the 
Olympic Games from the official report of Direc- 
tor Sullivan and a resume of the two days devot- 
ed to sports in which savages were the only 
contestants, in which it is proved conclusively 
that savages are not the natural born athletes we 
have heretofore supposed them to be. This is 
the first time in which the athletic performances 
of savages have ever been systematically 
recorded. 

This is the largest Athletic Almanac ever pub- 
lished, containing 32o pages. Numerous illus- 
tr.itions of prominent athletes and track teams. 

PRICE 10 CENTS 

For sale by all newsdealers and 
A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 



New York 
Philadelphia 
Buffalo 
Boston 
Minneapolis 
Syracuse 



Chicago St. Louis 

San Francisco Kansas City 



Denver Washington 
Baltimore Pittsburg 
New Orleans Cincinnati 
Montreal, Can London, Eng. 
^S=-Send for copy of Spalding's Athletic Goods 
Catalogue. It's free. 



When in Need of 
Dry Goods, Dress Goods, Shoes, 
Notions, Hats, Oueensware, 
Carpets, Oil Cloth, Line 
leums and Groceries 
It Will Pay You to See Us. Ladies' and 
Gents' Furnishings and Shoes a Specialty 

SHENK & KINPORTS, 

Main Street, ANNVILLE. 

1860 1885 

J. HENRY MILLER, 
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENT 

S. W. Cor, 8th and Willow Sts„ 
LEBANON, PA, 



ALL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 



SHOES . . 



Neatly Impaired 

at Reasonable Pfiees. 



Wm. D. EL1L1IOTT, 

East main St. Annville. 



JOSEPH MILLER, 
Furniture and Undertaking, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



lemberger's compound tar Lozenges 

IN BOXES— 25c, 10c and 5c. 

p !nly*at d LEWIBERGER & CO.'S PHARMACY, Lebanon, Pa. 



JOS. L. LEMBERGER, Ph. M. 



FRANK GLEIM Ph.G. 




[ 




LITHOGRAPHERS 

5th and Liberty Sts. PHILA. 

Diplomas and Certificates of 
Membership, 

Commercial Work our Specialty. 



W. S. SEABOLD, 

Druggist. 

Students' Headquarters ! 

Perfumes, Toilet and Fancy 
Articles, Cigars, Etc, 



-ANNVILLE, PA. 



WILLIAM P. GAMBER, 

Successor to GAMBER & FAILER. 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



4RD WARE and HOUSE-FURNISHINGS. 
Heaters, Ranges, Furnaces, Tinsmithing, Plumbing, Gem Ice Cream 
Freezers, Zero Refrigerators, (charcoal filled ); Sterling Puritan Oil Stoves 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 
No. 43 North 9th St„ LEBANON, F»A 



Do Vou Know 



Life 



That we are headquarters for everything in Books 1 
Write to us for prices on the following t Geikie's Bible 
Helps, Expositor's Bible, In fact we will furnish you 
anything in the Book line, at reasonable prices, 

U. B. Publishing Rouse, 

Dayton, Ohio. 

LEBANON. FA. 

INSURANCE ^'%t ie Glass Health 



Nutting 
Building 

Fire Liability 
Boiler 



Graduation-WHAT? 



If you want to start right in business 
or technical work, we can answer the 
question. Men wanted for desirable posi- 
tions to be open with high grade employers ' 
after July 1. A limited number of good op- 
portunities for summer work. 
Write us to-day stating position desired. 

HAPGOODS (Inc.) 

309 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 

Hartford Bldg., Chicago. 
Williamson Bldg., Cleveland. 
Park Bldg., Pittsburg. 
Pennsylvania Bldg., Philadelphia. 
Chemical Bldg., St. Louis. 
Loan & Trust Bldg., Minneapolis. 
Other offices in other cities. 



Franlz's Furniture Bazaar 

We are prepared, through 
long years of study, to 
offer a Superb Line of Fur- 
niture in all grades from 
which to make selections 
at low prices 

D. A. FRANTZ, Undertaker 

732-734 Cumberland Street, Lebanon 



jCebanon Valley College^ 

jinnville, IP a. 



This College, founded in 1866 and chartered with full university privileges 
hy our State Legislature in 1867, stands for character, high scholarship and noble 
manhood and womanhood. Here choice young people from various states come 
into competition and fellowship with one another, and with teachers of high 
character, sound learning and progressive methods and ideas. 

TJhe College department 

Offers five Groups of Studies leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. The 
groups bear the names of the leading subjects included in them. They are : the 
Classical Group, the Philosophical Group, the Chemical-Biological Group, the 
Historical- Political Group, and the Modern Language Group. 

TJhe Academy department 

Covers the work of the standard High and Normal Schools and Academies 
and prepares for College, Teaching and Business. 

Uhe Conservatory of ^usic 

Offers complete courses in Pianoforte, Voice, Organ, Harmony, etc., after methods 
of the foremost European Conservatories. The various branches of art are also taught. 

Advantages : 

Thoroughness, Cheapness, Completeness, Commodious Buildings and a Fine 
Campus for Athletic purposes. 

The personal attention given each student secures to him a splendid educa- 
tion under the most stimulating influences. 



Jail Verm begins Sept. 12/05; Winter Verm, fan. 4, '06 



Jor further Snformation jiddress 

Pres. jfcervin 9l. floop, Ph. *D., 

Jinn v tile, IP a, 



THE 

FORUM 



JUNE, 1905 




tiniiiTJtiiHminniiniiiti i n i f ii i ii iii f i T Kin if nn iiiniiiiiiiimmnniimnfiriiiiiiit ifMM Ttttiiif if iiii fM i/j i /tin; I jj t m 1 1 ii I ti < ttt- 




Lebanon V alley College 



WILL & GANTZ, 



Fresh . . . 
Groceries 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



T. m. Graybill 



Successor to J. A. DeHuff 



Bookseller 
and Stationer 



Lebanon, Penn'a 

A splendid collection of Pictures and 
Novelties suitable for Christmas Presents 
just received and sold at reasonable prices. 



6eo. Krause Hardware Co., 



Hardware 



Headquarters for Athletic Goods, Base Ball Supplies, Tents, Ham 
mocks. Refrigerators, Etc. 



BICYCLES AND BICYCLE SUNDRIES, 



Lebanon, Pa, 



J. C. Schmidt 

Jeweler 
• nd Optician 

743-45 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PENN'A 



GOOD THINGS ONLY ARE GIFTS 
FROM US. Also REPAIRING. 



* Gallatin * 

Headquarters For 

Tine Confectionery, Choice 
fruits and nut$. 



RESTAURANT ATTACHED 

Oysters In All Styles 



Why Not? 



BUY YOUR 

10 Per Cent. Discount to Students 

FROM US 

CILLEY & BENNETCH, 



SHOES 



169 North Ninth Street, 
LEBANON, PA. 



THE FORUM. 



E. B. Marshall, M.D., 

No. 34 East Main St., 

ANNVILLE, P A. 



Dr. Kauffman & Seidel 

Oculist, Opticians. 
706 Cumberland Street, Lebanon 



Established I856 



DR. ROSS' Sarsaparilla or Blood Pills 

Purify the Blood and Cure Dyspepsia, Indiges- 
tion, Constipation and Liver Complaint. 



Price 25 cents per box. By mail on receipt of Price. 

. C01 

LEBANON, F>A. 



DR. GEO. ROSS & CO., ° pp - Court House - 



HARRY LIGHT 

BOOKS, and STATIONERY 

Cor. Main and Manheim Streets, ANNVILLE, PA. 

Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second-Hand and Shelf- Worn 

School and College Text Books 



Together with a Complete Assortment of 

Stationery, Wall Paper 
arid Window Shades 
School and College Text BOOKS a Speciality 

We Buy, Sell and Exchange, Old and New 
Text-Books. 



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M. A. BLAZIER 





Spares no Pains in Giving His Patrons 
Polite Attention and Good 



Which look Artistic and 
True To Life. 

Reductions to S tudent 

STUDIO: 

839 Cumb. St., LEBANON, PA. 




Class of 
81. 



C. E. Rauch, cl ° 

Offers Special Discounts 
to Students on 

Merchant Tailoring. 



10th and Cumberland Streets, 
LEBANON, PA. 



SELL 

iUalKover and $oro$t$ 



io Per Cent off to Students, 
opp. Court Rouse, Lebanon, Fa. 



College Alumni 

Who lived in Annville during their College career 
should be sure to 

READ THE ANNVILLE JOURNAL 

and get all the Town and College News, 

OUR PRESSES TURN DDTNTTTMP FRCM THE 
OUT ALL KINDS OF rKHN 1 llNVj PLAIN SIM« 
PLE EVERY DAY KIND TO THE MOST ARTISTIC. 

Every Job printed by us secures the best attention 
and has never failed to prove satisfactory. 

We are always pleased to show samples of our work 

bo* The,*, ^^_The Annville Journal 

The Forum is a product of our press. 

1 



THE FORUM 



Catering . . . 

Weddings DIETRICH'S, 

OUR SPECIALTY 1015 N. Third Street. 335 Market Street 

Fancy Ices, Cakes, Confections Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shipped Anywhere. Correspondence Solicited. 



flnneille eicctrc Cigbt 
Company 

Electric Light Electric Wiring 
Electrical Supplies 

ot every description 

annville] 7 , PA. 

Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
Dentist 

Reductions to Students 
72 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

THOSTh, ELLIOTT, 
Shoemaker 

Corner Main and White Oak Sts,, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

IF_ BATDORF 

Dealer In 

Ladies' and Gents' 
Furnishings 
Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 

Harvey L. Seltzer 

(Formerly with Isaac Wolf) 
Strictly One-Price 

Clothier 

769 Cumberland t„ LEBANON, PA- 



JNO. S. SHOPE 

Queensware 
Groceries Hardware 

LADIES' and GENTS' 

Furnishings 

Discount to Students 

West Main St, Annville, Pa. 
JOSEPH G. KELCHNER 
Butcher 

Daily Meat Market of home dressed meats 

Also a full line of Smoked Meats. 
Annville, > ✓ Pa, 

W, C, WOOLF 

Groceries and Provisions 

65 East Main St., ANNVILLE, PA 

Stephen Hubertis 

BOOK 
BINDER 

320 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 



THE FORUM. 



M. A. BLAZIER 





Spares no Pains in Giving His Patrons 
Polite Attention and Good 



Which look Artistic and 
True To Life. 

Reductions to S tudent 

STUDIO: 
839 Cumb. St., LEBANON, PA. 





Class of 
81. 



C. E. Rauch, cl * 

Offers Special Discounts 
to Students on 

Merchant Tailoring. 



10th and Cumberland Streets, 
LEBANON, PA. 



fioffman Bros. 



SELL 



mainover ana Sorosis 

Shoes 

10 Per Cent off to Students, 
opp. court tfouse, Lebanon, Pa. 



College Alumni 

Who lived in Annville during their College career 
should be sure to 

READ THE ANNVILLE JOURN 1 

and get all the Town and College News. 

OUR PRESSES TURN DDTMTTM^ FRCM THE 
OUT ALL KINDS OF iKHN 1 JLiNVj PLAIN SIM' 
PLE EVERY DAY KIND TO THE MOST ARTISTIC. 

Every Job printed by us secures the best attention 
and has never failed to prove satisfactory. 

We are always pleased to show samples of our work 

no* pi™,, -^^.The Annville Journal 

The Forum is a product of our press. 




Volume XVIII. JUNE, 1905. Number 9 

Commencement of 1905. 
The President's Reception to the Seniors. 

President and Mrs. Roop gave a reception to the graduating class 
at their home on College avenue, Friday evening, June 9. The home of 
the president was tastefully decorated with flowers and potted plants for 
the occasion. The faculty, graduating class and other invited guests 
were present. After the guests had been received by Dr. and Mrs 
Roop, refreshments were served and the evening was spent socially. 

The Merchant of Venice 

For the first time in the history of the College, a Shakesperean 
play, The Merchant of Venice," was given on Saturday evening June 
ten. The Young Women's Christian Association managed the financial 
side, and a large audience was on hand to encourage and applaud the 
efforts of fl ose taking part. The Y. W. C. A. committee chose the caste 
as far as possible from the physical fitness for the various roles This 
explains much of the naturalness so surprising to the audience who 
expected at things would be a trifle more amateurish than they turned 
out to ^ 

The play was given in the Elizabethan manner, upon a stage 
similar to patterns in use in Shakespeare's day. Prof. Jackson designed 
it, and the willing students carried out his designs perfectly Be it said 
to the credit of the audience that the old style of the performance did not 
seem to interfere with their enjoyment. 

The intellectual and dramatic sides of the play were directed by 
the Departments of Public Speaking and English, and the unusual success 
m these respects showed clearly the breadth and thoroughness aimed at 
by the instructors. 

Great credit is due all the students, who had no other aim in taking 
part than self -improvement, and who worked hard since before last 
Christmas for the merited praises that they won. The best thing of all 



1 94 THE FORUM 

was that the performance was even always the delight of Shakesperean 
lovers and the nearest approach to real dramatic art. Every one strived 
to make his part, large or small, the best of all, and so wrought out a 
genuinely inspiring production of this ever new creation of the immortal 
Bard of Avon. 

A rich program of incidental music was given by Prof. Oldham, 
Misses Amy Gabel, Catharine Smith, Edith King, Catharine Gensemer, 
Margaret Berlin and Messrs. Crawford, McKenrick, H. and A. Spessard. 
The following is the cast of characters : 

The Duke of Venice Mr. George Owen 

The Prince of Morocco Mr. Arthur Spessard 

Antonio— The Merchant of Venice Mr. Merle Hoover 

Bassanio-His Friend Mr. Warren Kaufmann 

Salanio ^ C Mr - Edv/ard Knauss 

Salarino !• Friends to Anfconio and \ Mr. Max Lehman 

Gratiano ) Basssanio | Mr. Ralph Engle 

Lorenxo— in love with Jessica Mr. Berry Plummer 

SHYLOCK— a Jew Mr. T. Bayard Beatty 

Tubal-a Jew, his Friend Mr. P. E. Mathias 

Launcelot Gobbo— a Clown Mr. Roger Hartz 

Old Gobbo— Father to Launcelot Mr. Andrew Bender 

Salerio-a Messenger Mr. Fred. Miller 

Leonardo-Servant to Bassanio Mr. John Hambright 

Stephano ) a . . _ .. | Mr. Park Esbenshade 
Balthasar } Servants to Portia j Mr. William Herr 

PORTIA— A Rich Heiress Miss Charlotte Fisher 

Nerissa— Her Waiting Maid Miss Neda Knaub 

Jessica— Daughter to Sbylock Miss Alice Crowell 

Courtiers, Ladies, Gaoler, Officers, Servants, Pages and other 
attendants. 

SCENE— Partly in Venice and partly at Portia's Villa, Belmont, on 

the mainland. 
PERIOD— The Sixteenth Century. 
TIME— A little more than three months. 

The following incidental Shakesperean Music was rendered during 
the performance ; 

(a) Overture, Midsummer Night's Dream Mendelssohn 

Mr. Crawford, Prof. Oldham 

(b) "0 Mistress Mine" (Twelfth Night) F.Barry 

Miss Amy Gabel 

(c) " It Was a Lover and His Lass " (As You Like It) . . Parker 

Miss Catharine Smith 




THE FORUM 



195 



(d) "Hark, Hark, the Lark " (Cymbeline) Sullivan 

Miss Edith King 

(e) Wedding (Midsummer Night's Dream) Mendelssohn 

Mr. McKenrick, Prof. Oldham 

(f ) " How Sweet the Moonlight Sleeps (Merchant of Venice) 

H. Leslie 

Misses Gensemer and Berlin, Messrs. H. Spessard and A. Spessard 



Baccalaureate Sunday. 

The thirty-ninth Baccalaureate service of Lebanon Valley College 
was held in the Auditorium of the Conservatory, on Sunday morning, 
June 11, at 10:15 a - m - A large number of friends attended the service 
held in honor of the class of 1905. President H. U. Roop preached the 
Baccalaureate Sermon. He chose his text from John 18:37, — Pilate, 
therefore, said unto him, Art thou a king then ? Jesus answered, Thou 
sayest that I am a king. To this end have I been born and to this end 
am I come into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. 

The theme of President Roop's discourse was Allegiance to Christ 
a Favoring Condition of the Best Human Culture and Education. He 
said, Christ fosters good taste in literature, and Christianity is favorable 
to culture. It inspires the individual man. He spoke of the inter- 
dependence of culture and Christianity. Each needs the other in the 
development of full manhood. The student in a Christian college is 
likely to be liberal and Catholic in his opinions. He receives the culture 
that religion requires in the development of man as a spiritual being. 

The order of services was as follows : 
Organ Prelude 
Doxology 

Invocation Eev. W. J. Zuck 

Responsive Reading 
Hymn— Holy, Holy, Holy ! 
Scripture Lesson— John 18, 28-40. 

Prayer Bishop Kephart 

Solo— "The Good Shepherd" Van der Water 

Mr. Arthur Spessard. 
Offering (For Y. M. C. A. Northrield Fund.) 

Anthem — Te Deum Smart 
Sernion President Roop 

Hymn — Now thank we all our God. 
Benediction 



196 



THE FORUM 



Sacred Concert 

On Sunday afternoon at 3 p. m. a sacred recital was given by 
Paofessors Jackson and Oldham. It was very largely attended and all 
enjoyed this new event in the exercises of the week. The following 
program was given : 

Widor Andante 

Bossi March in E Flat 

Mendelssohn Recitative and Aria "St. Paul" 

"O God Have Mercy" 
Mendelssohn Song Without Words in E Minor 
Raff Etude A Flat 

Toura Hymn to the Angels 

(With Piano, Organ and Violin) 
Cappocci Fantasie Andante, March, Finale 

Campus Praise Service 

A campus praise service was held in front of the music hall at 
6.15 in the evening. Although the weather appeared threatening, the 
chairs were soon filled and a very interesting service was held. J. B. 
Hambright, president of the Y. M. C. A., acted as leader. Several 
members of the graduating class spoke of the good derived from the 
Association's meetings during their stay at College. 

Address Before the Christian Associations 

The evening service, under the auspices of the two Associations 
was held at 7.45 p. m. The address was given by Franklin S. Edmonds, 
of Philadelphia. Mr. Edmonds spoke very interestingly of the progress 
of Christianity, its reverses and its successes. He portrayed the condi- 
tion of the Christian world at various stages of history and showed in a 
very beautiful manner that we must live to help others. The address 
was one of the few that seem too short because of their inspiring and 
invigorating effect. 

The following program was rendered : 
Organ Prelude 

Invocation Rev. E. H. Gerhart 

Hymn — Love Divine all Love Excelling 
Scripture Lesson 

Male Chorus — Rocked in the Cradle of the Deep Knight Nevin 
Prayer Rev. W. F. DeLong 

Announcements and Offering 



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197 



Anthem — Hark, Hark, My Soul Shelly 

Soprano, Miss Catharine Gensemer 

Alto, Miss Ruth Weaber 
Address Franklin S. Edmonds, Esq. 

Hymn — Saviour Again to Thy Dear Name We liaise 
Benediction 

The Carnegie Library Dedication. 

Before a good sized audience in the assembly room of the new 
Carnegie Library building the dedicatory exercises were held. After 
singing and the invocation by Rev. Daniel Eberly, President Roop stated 
the object of the services. Bishop E. B. Kephart then offered the dedi- 
catory prayer. The address of T. L. Montgomery, State Librarian, 
followed. He took as his subject "Library Affairs in Pennsylvania," 
treating of the origin, development and growth of the public library 
system in our state and the results as shown in the improvement of our 
citizens. Hon. Henry Houck, Deputy State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction then made a characteristic address in which he recalled many 
interesting reminiscences of old Annville Academy. The dedicatory 
address was then made by Bishop J. S. Mills upon the value of books 
and libraries. After the singing of America, Presiding Elder H. S. 
Gabel pronounced the benediction. 

The Art Exhibit 

The annual art exhibition and reception was held in the Art Room 
on Monday afternoon under the direction of Miss Edith Baldwin, the 
instructor in Art. The display of china, water colors, sketches, etc., 
was exceptionally good, and speaks well for the work done in that 
department during this year. 

Music Commencement 

On Monday evening the commencement exercises of the class in 
music were held. This season has been one of special success for our 
music department and under the direction of Professor Oldham and Pro- 
fessor Jackson a large class was graduated. The exercises given were 



198 



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The program ren- 



(Three Pianos) 



(Voice) 
(Voice) 

(Two Pianot) 

(Gli Ugonotti) 

(Organ) 
(Organ) 

(Die Meistersinger) 



excellent and fittingly closed the good year's work, 
dered was as follows : 

Handel Fugue 

Misses Fisher, Gabel, Johnson, 
Ulrich, Wolfe 

Schumann Evening Song (Organ) 

Tschirck Festival Fan tasie (Organ) 

Mr. Herbert Crawford 
Wagner Traume 
Schumann Humility 

Miss Catharine Smith 
Liszt Les Preludes 

Misses Johnson and Wolfe 
Meyerbeer Cavatina 

Miss Catharine Smith 
Wostenholm Question and Answer 

Handel Sixth Concerto 

Mr. Ivan McKenrick 
Wagner Vorspiel 

Misses Fisher, Gabel, Johnson, 
Ulrich, Wolfe 

The members of the class are : Organ, Herbert Crawford, Leba- 
non ; Ivan McKenrick, Ebensburg ; Piano, Misses Charlotte Fisher, 
York ; Laura McCormick, Altoona ; Amy Gabel, Emily Johnson, Kath- 
erine Ulrich, Blanche Wolfe, Lebanon ; Voice, Miss Catharine Smith, 
Lebanon. 

Miss Sallie Kreider was granted a certificate in art. 
Class Day 

The class day exercises were held on Tuesday afternoon and all 
the parts were well rendered. The burlesque on a meeting of the 
faculty, and the "Ritus Immolationis" were very interesting and speak 
well for the originality of the cless. The program : 

Orchestra — March, The Debutante 

President's Address 

Class in Session 

Orchestra — Overture, Lustspiel 
Past and Future 
Oration — "Ad Summa Tende" 
Orchestra — Selection, "Babes in Toy land" 
Kitus Immolationis 
Class Song 

Orchestra— March, "Old Glory" 



/. /. Scull 
P. E. Mathias 

Keler-Bela 
A. R. Clippinger 
G. D. Owen 
Victor Herbert 



Royal Chef— Ben Jerome 



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The Oratorical Contest 

The Junior Oratorical contest for the Alumni prizes was held on 
Tuesday evening when the following program was observed : 

March— Grand Enter /. /. Scull 

Invocation Rev. Harry E. Miller 

Overture — Zampa Herold 
Oration — An Aristocracy of Merit Andrew Bender 

Oration— "The Strength of the Pack is the Wolf" Merle M. Hoover- 
Oration — Is Socialism a Menace ? J. Warren Kaufmann 
Waltz — Bine Danube Strauss 
Oration— Stephen A. Douglas, Statesman and Patriot J. C. Rupp 
Oration— Andrew G. Curtain, A Victim of Corruption C. E. Shenk 
March— College Days Frautzert 
The judges, Hon. Thomas H. Capp, Rev. J. Mitchell Page, Leb- 
anon, and C. V.jHenry, Esq., awarded the prizes as follows: First, 
twenty-five dollars, Merle M. Hoover, Chambersburg ; second, ten 
dollars, J. Warren Kaufmann, Mt. Carmel ; honorable mention, Andrew 
Bender, Dillsburg. 

The Alumni Banquet 

After the oratorical contest the annual Alumni banquet was held 
in the Carnegie Library building. Many of our Alumni were present for 
the banquet and for the class reunions which followed. An excellent 
menu was furnished and following it these toasts were given, every one 
in a happy and pleasing manner : 

Thomas F. Miller, A. B. '01 Toastmaster 
The Alumnus and His College Rev. John Owen, A.M., '91 

The Ways of "Old Penitentiary" John H. Maysilles, A.M.^ '95 
What We Expect of the Class of 1905 Mrs. H. E. Enders, A.B., '01 
The Class of 1905 F. Berry Plummer, '05 

Commencement 

The Commencement exercises of the class of nineteen hundred 
and five was held in the College Auditorium on Wednesday morning. 
The chapel was filled completely with the friends of the graduates and 
other visitors. The commencement exercises this year were successful 
in every way and all who heard them were well pleased. The order of 
exercises was as follows : 

March— College Life h. Frautzen 

Invocation Bishop E. B. Kephart 

Overture — Mons Chaufleuri Offenbach 



/ 



200 THE FORUM 

Commencement Oration Albert H. Smyth, Ph.D, L.L.D. 

Selection— From "Woodland" G- Luders 

Presentation of Diplomas and Conferring of Degrees 
March— Yankee Grit Holyman 
Dr. Smyth, the commencement orator, took as his subject, "Some 
Ethical Teachings of the Life of Benjamin Franklin." The speaker is 
an authority upon Benjamin Franklin and is the author of one of the 
most complete biographies of that great American and accordingly his 
address was of special interest to all. He gave many interesting facts 
of Franklin's life as a statesman, diplomat, scientist, philosopher, man 
of letters and philanthropist, summing him up as the best example of the 
true American of his period. From the triumphs as well as the mistakes 
•of Franklin's life Dr. Smyth drew many practical lessons for the person 
•of the present day. Industry and frugality were given as the secret of 
.Franklin's greatness and these two virtues should be possessed by the 
youth of the present day who would strive for s access. 

The oration was presented in a clear and pleasing manner and won 
the commendation of all present. 

President Roop conferred diplomas and the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts upon the following : 

Victor Arthur Arndt Valley View 

Thomas Bayard Beatty Quincy 

Helen Barbara Bressler .... Lebanon 

Arthur Rush Clippinger Shippensburg 

Alice Lydia Crowell York 

Emma Frances Engle Hummelstown 

Ealph Landis Engle Palmyra 

Elmer Ellsworth Erb - - - - - Hockersville 
May Beam Hershey . - - - - Derry Church 

Eachel Nancy Kaufiman Dallastown 

Titus Heilman Kreider .... Cleona 

Pearl Eugene Mathias Highspire 

Ellen Weinland Mills Annville 

George Dickson Owen Laurel Springs, N.J. 

Charles Clinton Peters ... - Altenwald 
Frederick Berry Plummer - Hagerstown, Md. 

Gordon Ira Eider Mechauicsburg 

Benjamin Daugherty Eojahn - Dallastown 
Albert Jay Shenk ----- Annville 

David D. Buddinger Bellegrove 

Harry F. Stauffer Millville, N. J. 

Jesse M. Hostetter Phomixville 



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Annual Concert 

On Wednesday evening the Music department held its annual 
concert in the|College"Auditoriura. A large audience was present which 
greatly enjoyed the excellent program which was rendered. Each par- 
ticipant acquitted himself creditably and every number was well received. 
The program : 

Suppe — Banditenstreiche Overture Two Pianos 

Misses Mabel Herr, Louise Kreider, 
Mary Wolf, Elsie Yeager. 
V. Hollsender— "The Fairies, " Trio 

Misses Cecelia Oldham, Amy Gabel, Eva Spangler. 
Tschaikowski — Allegro, Symphony Pathetique, Piano and Organ 

Miss Flo. Coppenhaver, Mr. Herbert Oldham. 
Gounod — Le Parlate d'Amour Faust 

Miss Catherine Smith. 
Donizetti, "Unto These Arms, " Vocal Duet 

Misses Elsie Arnold, Ruth Weaber. 
Handel — Fugue, E minor, Three Pianos 

Misses Fisher, Gabel, Johnson, McCormick, Ulrich, Wolfe. 
Rossini — Charity, Miss Lucile Mills and Sextette. 
Ravnia — Tyrolienne, Three Pianos 

Miss Ano Adams, Edith Gingrich, May Meyers, 
Lillian Snell, Messrs. Elmer Hodges, Eli Faus. 
R. Brooks — "The Swan Song, " Reading 

Miss Viola Moyer. 
Hesse — Fantasie, op. 87, Organ Duet 

Messrs. Ivan McKenrick, H. Oldham. 

C. Goetze— "Calm as the Night, " Duet 

Miss Edith King, Prof. Jackson. 
Brahms — Slavische Tanze. No. 4, Two Pianos 

Misses Iva Maulfair, Constance Oldham. 

D. Buck — Huzza ! Huzza ! (by request) Glee Club 
Gounod — Valse, "Faust " Two Pianos 

Misses Margaret Berlin, Lizzie Moyer, 
Flo. Wolf, Mr. Isaiah Klopp. 
W. H. Jude— "King of the Mist, " Mr. Arthur Spessard 

W. Bargi el— Spring Song, Ladies' Chorus 

Flotow— "Stradella " Two Pianos and Organ 

Misses Johnson, McCormick, Ulrich, Wolfe, Mr. Herbert Crawford. 

Senior Reception. 

After the annual concert the senior class held a reception to the 
friends of the class. The assembly room of the Carnegie Library build- 
ing was tastefully decorated for the occasion and a large number of 
guests were present. Excellent refreshments were served and a pleasant 
social time was spent by all. 



202 THE FORUM 



The Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

This meeting was held on Monday and on Tuesday in the Carnegie 
Library. The attendance was very large and there was great interest 
in the welfare of Lebanon Valley. Vice-president Eberly presided on 
Monday and President Ulrich on Tuesday. 

Much time was taken up in making a new set of by-laws for the 
College. Finally this was done and, with the exception of a few minor 
points, those adopted had the unanimous approval of the board. 

All the old teachers were re-elected, President Roop's election being 
for five years. This was deemed a fitting way to express approval of the 
broad plans for the building up of the College which he has inaugurated. 

Miss Trovillo, of Illinois, who just graduated from Wellesley 
College, Massachusetts, was elected Professor of German and Precept- 
ress, Miss Baldwin having resigned this latter post. Miss Trovillo' s 
coming completes the modern language staff of permanent instructors. 

Another important move was the election of Mr. William C. 
Arnold, of the class of 1903, to the position of treasurer and registrar. 
He will also give one course in the department of history and political 
science. Mr. Arnold is well-known to all recent alumni of the College. 
He comes to us from two years of graduate work in Columbia University 
where he received his Master's degree one year ago. The College is very 
fortunate in securing the services of a man so fitted by both scholastic 
and practical training for a place so urgently needed by the greater 
Lebanon Valley. 

The financial condition as reported to the board by President 
Roop thrilled them with hope and encouragement. The buildings are 
most all well under way and they fulfill our highest dreams of service 
and of beauty. President Roop urged all to work now for a large 
endowment and plans for such work were made by the finance committee. 

The board will cooperate heartily in the celebration of the fortieth 
anniversary of the founding of Lebanon Valley next June. 

The following men constitute the executive committee of the 
board for the coming year : President Roop, Rev. I. H. Albright, S. 
P. Light, Esq., Rev. R. R. Butterwick, Messrs. S. F. and B. H. Engle. 

The members of the board this year took unusual interest in 
planning for success here and the Forum feels that this will be contagi- 
ous and help to enkindle the cooperation of United Brethren everywhere in 
the east in this grand and efficient service to humanity and to the church. 



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203 



Address by Rev. D. Eberly, D. D. 

At the Laying of the Corner-Stone of the New Administration Building. 

On the twenty-third day of August, in the year of our I^ord 1867, 
there sssembled on these grounds a collection of interested people to lay, 
with appropriate ceremonies, the corner-stone of a building to be devoted 
to the educational work of our church in the East. Soon the massive 
walls began to rise by the accretion of bricks and mortar, and when the 
belfry and steeple towered aloft many a heart throbbed with joy in 
beholding the dome of the magnificent building radiating the sunlight of 
heaven. For more than a third of a century the main centre, the chapel 
and one wing, with recitation rooms, society halls and dormitories, 
furnished facilities essential to the purposes designed. In recent years, 
and in unison with the original architectural plan, direct and transverse 
wings were added, giving to the building a double capaciousness and 
rendering it a grand and imposing structure. 

Thus enlarged aud beautified, its splendid appearance engendered 
emotions of gratitude within our hearts, and we felt that the spacious 
edifice was an honor to us. And time can never efface from our memories 
the grief occasioned by the cruel flames which on the dreary evening of 
December twenty-fourth, 1904, lit up the murky sky with lurid currents, 
consigning our cherished temple with its gathered treasures to ashes, 
leaving the charred and blackened walls as sad reminders of the terrible 
havoc wrought. 

But when we take a retrospective view of the building's history 
and the purposes it served we find it replete with sacred recollections of 
lessons taught and noble principles inculcated by the devoted teachers 
who gave instructions within its consecrated walls. 

From 1870 to June, 1904, three hundred and forty-seven young 
men and young women were graduated. These received mental training 
in the recitation rooms, made their speeches and read their essays in its 
halls ; and thus laid the foundation for usefulness in life. To their 
number we may add many more students who received instructions in 
the scholastic branches, in music and in art, many of whom have proved 
an honor to the College and a blessing to the communities in which they 
live. Since 1870 every year has had its graduating class, and now 
thirty-six such classes have gone forth from Lebanon Valley College to 
aid and bless humanity. Today we find them engaged as presidents and 



204 



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professors in colleges and theological seminaries ; principals and teachers 
in high schools and academies ; clergymen, physicians, attorneys-at-law, 
editors, bankers, farmers, merchants, clerks and missionaries in foreign 
lands. As teachers they are engaged from Yale to the University of the 
Pacific ; and as ministers of the gospel they are found from Maine to 
Oregon ; and as business men they follow the flag of our country. 

Of the three hundred and forty-seven classical and scientific 
graduates seventeen have honorably finished their earthly labors and are 
now with the redeemed in a better land. I cannot, at this time, speak of 
these excellent men and women. What a noble record they have made ! 
One who came here in the infancy of the College, gave a score of years 
of his consecrated life to the service of the church as preacher, teacher, 
editor and author ; another supervised the public instruction of this 
county for years and gave the schools a worthy eminence ; another stood 
at the bar of justice and in his pleadings gave evidence of his strong and 
cultured mind. These seventeen have finished their earthly course ; and 
theirs are honored names. L,ike the " memory of joys that are past" 
they are " pleasant and mournful to the soul." When the sad intellig- 
ence came that they had fallen our hearts felt that the ' ' beauty of Israel 
was slain upon her high places." Admired and loved, they were taken 
hence, while the green tendrils of our friendship and our love twine 
fondly 'round their memories. 

When the corner-stone, in sixty -seven, was laid, to many the future 
of our educational enterprise seemed problematical. A large portion of 
our church membership in this section of the country not only did not 
sympathize with the movement, but they were opposed. Some in sullen 
indifference simply looked on, while others maniiested an open and 
unreasonable hostility. Even some of the ministers felt that the mission 
of the United Brethren church was simply to the plain but good people 
of the rural districts ; for them the city population had no attraction. 
Their prototype is found in the ancient Book of Job, where he declares 
that the ' ' Wild ass scorneth the multitude of the city . ' ' And as Jeremiah 
says, ' ' A wild ass used to the wilderness snuffeth up the wind at her 
pleasure." So did they, with wondrous facility, inhale wild notions 
which assumed fantastic forms in their heads, and came forth in fanatical 
exhalations of abusive tirades against educational culture. Their exhi- 
bitions of stupidity have passed ; a brighter era blesses the generation 



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205 



which has displaced them. The urban population, great and important, 
is found to be a necessary factor which can not be ignored. 

The work of Lebanon Valley College during the past thirty-nine 
years has had a wonderfully formative power in shaping, moulding and 
directing the growth of our deuomination in the East — for nobler and 
better aspirations and attainments. " Forgetting those things which are 
behind and reaching forth unto those which are before," we press forward 
to greater achievements. The past is an assurance for the future. Our 
college work had warm and firm friends at its inception, whose number 
increased as the years rolled on, and at this hour the institution is 
enshrined in more hearts than ever before. Out of the ashes of the old 
rises the rejuvenated new, possessing a vigor and energy that will exert 
a healthful influence in the great work of mental culture and moral 
elevation. 

Today we are assembled to lay the corner-stone of the new 
Administration Building. To the friends of the institution this is an 
interesting and auspicious occasion. The three conferences in affiliation 
have a membership of between forty and fifty thousand. In this number 
are some of the best men and women to be found ; the territory occupying 
the most fertile portions of Pennsylvania, Virginia and Maryland, 
embracing large cities and thousands of flourishing towns. The abun- 
dance of mines of coal and deposits of iron and copper enhance the 
wealth ; while the fertility of rich valleys afford an exuberance of all the 
necessaries of life. Thus, blessed with a healthful climate and well 
ordered government, there is nothing real to hinder or discourage us in 
the grand and noble enterprise of building up an institution which shall 
be an honor to our denomination. Most imperatively must we have a 
place to educate the sons and daughters reared in the families of our 
church ; an institution which, by its excellence, will also attract those 
of our immediate pale and be a noted centre of philosophical inquiry and 
mental training ; and thus do our share of the work which a benign 
providence has committed to our charge. 

The building to be here erected, whose foundation is already 
established, and whose corner-stone is now to be laid, is designed for the 
special purpose of Christian education. The halls will be consecrated to 
the cardinal purpose that young people are to enjoy the benefits, privi- 
leges and advantages of such instruction as comes from master-minds. 
The studies comprised in a college course are framed with the explicit 



206 THE] FORUM 

object of furnishing thorough mental discipline and of imparting useful 
knowledge. These branches constitute a treasury of immense wealth. 
Language, philosophy, history, poetry, astronomy, mathematics, belles- 
lettres, sciences, morals, religion — these with their numerous excellencies 
not only afford charms to allure the student on, and so to enrich his 
mind ; but the utiiity and undying value which, enshrined in the monu- 
ments of their intrinsic glory, throw a light upon intellectual investigation 
and illumine the whole landscape stretched out before the mental vision, 
so that out of darkness shall emerge beauty and effulgence, unfurling the 
rich trophies acquired by the unremitted toils of centuries. 

Within these halls the young men and young women can freely 
commune with the great spirits of past ages, who in the realm of letters 
and culture have accomplished all that could be attained by giant intellect 
and cultivated genius. They can travel over fields of classic grandeur 
and learn from those great masters who have enstamped their character 
upon everything grand and noble in the sublime teachings which show 
forth the glorious creations of immortal genius. 

We trust that for all time to come this ground on which we stand 
may be sacred to the cause of education ; and that the building to be 
here erected, may, for coming ages, be the home of intellectual advance- 
ment. The perpetuity of our free government, and hope of the church 
rests in a pure Christian education. Well could he whose tongue was 
touched with sacred inspiration ask : "If the foundations be destroyed, 
what can the righteous do?" And so may we inquire, if educational 
training and refined culture be discarded, what shall remain to illumine 
the future and to light up the pathway to happiness in the numerous 
departments of responsibility and honor. Let the standard of education, 
in all the departments, be high ; then will the healthful influence lead to 
the highest refinement, grandest culture and most brilliant renown. 

The relation of collegiate education to our church work is perma- 
nent. The impressions made by scholastic training endure and will not 
perish with the close of mortal life. These inculcations are more endur- 
ing than statues wrought in porphyry or granite or Parian marble. We 
admire the genius that with consummate skill formed those lifelike 
images that now stand preserved in the Belvedere of the Vatican ; in the 
grand-duke's gallery at Florence and in the Royal museum at Paris. 
But what is the group of Laocoou, or that of Niobe or of the Dying 
Gladiator when compared with the imperishable images enstamped upon 




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207 



the human mind. The former may be admired as the perfection of 
transcendent skill ; but upon the latter is placed the rich benediction of 
heaven. 

It is the fixed aim and unchangeable purpose of this college to 
impress upon the minds and hearts of the young men and young women, 
who are brought under her fostering care and vigilant training, the 
imperishable character and enduring nature of the work in which they 
are engaged ; so that they may realize the fact that a beneficent Provi- 
dence has committed to their charge an important trust by permitting 
them to wander amid the consecrated bowers of human learning, while 
the rich fields of divine wisdom unfold to them their luscious fruits. 
Thus with the elements of human and divine knowledge firmly implanted 
they become prepared to enter upon the rigid and exacting career of a 
lifework devoted to the suppression of error and to the diffusion and 
maintenance of truth. 

Real education teaches its votaries that their highest ambition 
and noblest aim is to be true to their calling and faithful to their God. 
Then like devoted sentinels guarding the right, their influence will 
radiate a heavenly enlightenment which will illumine the most distant 
points and remote ages. 



Alumni Personals. 

Ralph Engle, '05, has been awarded a scholarship in the graduate 
department of Yale University for his excellent thesis prepared for the 
biological department. This is a deserved tribute to both Mr. Engle and 
the department. 

Professor Schlichter was awarded the first of 116 prizes for writ- 
ing the best appreciation of The Youth's Companion, in a competition 
open to subscribers of this great journal throughout the world. 

Mr. Horace Kephart, contributes an interesting article on "What 
to Do When Lost" in the June Forest and Stream. 



208 



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"Not at Home." 

"Julia," said Mrs. Merton "If anyone calls this afternoon tell 
them that I am not at home. Now do you understand?" 

"Yes'm" answered the new girl, "Will you be away long?" 

"I shall be 'not at home' until I give you further instructions," 
said Mrs. Merton rather sharply, "Now you may retire; I wish to read." 

Julia went to the parlor where she had been dusting the furniture 
before her mistress called her upstairs. Before long the doorbell rang, 
— and in answer to the caller's inquiry Julia replied, — "not at home." 
very nicely indeed. She returned to her work feeling that she was 
learning quite fast. After a time the bell rang again. Julia went to the 
door. This time an expressman was there, and a large package stood on 
the steps. 

"A package for Mrs. Merton," said the man politely. "Will you 
have her sign this book, and arrange for the express charges?" 

"My mistress isn't at home," said Julia innocently. "She told 
me she wasn't." 

"Is Mr. Merton at home then?" asked the man. 

"I don't know, but I don't believe he is." 

"Can you find out?" 

"No, 'cause if he's in his little room what he calls his den he 
daresen't be bothered and if he isn't there, he isn't to home." 

"Very well if you will pay the expressage and sign this book I 
will leave the package with you." 

" Sure an' it's a long day since I've wrote a bit, mister, and I don't 
have no money to my name, only a quarther." 

"Then tell your mistress, when she returns, that I called," said 
the expsessman carrying the package back to the wagon. "She can 
send for her goods at the express-office. ' ' 

He was about to drive off when Mr. Merton, who heard a part of 
the conversation from within, called to him. Mr. Merton settled the 
bill and then told Julia to take the package into the library. After 
signing his name he followed the maid into the house, and asked, 

" Why didn't you call your mistress? I'll warrant she would be 
glad if I had not seen this package." 

" Me mistress tole me she wasn't to home," answered Julia. 

" She's at home when express packages arrive, you may be sure," 



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said Mr. Merton sarcastically. " You may tell her that I wish to see 
her here." 

Mrs. Merton presently appeared. She had been disturbed, and 
she looked morose and sullen, but her sour countenance became flushed 
with anger when she saw by her husband's side what she rightly supposed 
was her new hat. 

Mrs. Merton knew that her husband would object to her new hat 
but she hoped to get it unknown to him, and when it was already her 
own, he would pay the bill. Now she was caught but she determined to 
make the best of circumstances. 

Mr. Merton met his wife's angry look with a steady gaze, and 
simply said, " A package for you, wife." 

" Is it not addressed to me? Why should you send for it?" 

" It came to the house, Madam; I was compelled to lift it. Your 
new servant was going to let the expressman take it back to the office." 

Having said this Mr. Merton left the room. At the door he called 
back "Good-bye, enjoy your new hat. When the bill comes you may 
enjoy that, too." 

Mrs. Merton waited until she heard her husband pass out the door, 
then she rang the bell for Julia, "that stupid servant has spoiled all," 
she said to herself . " I'll discharge her this very day." 

"Why did you not tell me when this package came?" she said as 
soon as Julia's white apron appeared. 

" Sure an didn't you tell me you wer'n't to home?" came the 
answer assuredly. "Master said he thought you'd be at home for 
express packages, but I didn't know that." 

(( You idiot you have ruined everything," cried Mrs. Merton. 
' ' Like as not I must pay for a twenty dollar hat out of my own allowance 
just because of your ignorance. After this week you may secure another 
situation. Possibly the kitchen of a boarding house would suit you 
better than this. If anything more comes for me, remember I am at 
home. 

M. O. Billow '08. 



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Vol. XVIII. 



JUNE, 1905. 



No. 9 



Editoivin-Chief, 

MERLE M. HOOVER, '06. 

Associate Editors, 



RAY G. LIGHT 



JOHN C. RUPP, '06 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS : 



ETHEL MYERS, '07 
EDWARD E. KNAUSS, '07 



ERMA SHUPE, 'o8 
M. O. BILLOW, '08 



Business Managers s 

C. E. shenk, '06, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 



M. O. SNYDER 



, '06 



C. RAY BENDER, '07 



The Forum is published each month during the college year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

TERMS :— Subscription Price, 50 cents a Year. Single Copy, 10 cents. 

All business matter should be addressed to The Forum, Annville, Pa. ; all literary matter to 
Merle M. Hoover, Annville, Pa. 

Once a subscriber, always a subscriber, until notice for discontinuance, accompanied with all 
arrearages, has been received. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second-class mail matter. 



The Performance of the Merchant of Venice was well 
received by the college public and friends. So well that the Y. W. C. 
A. has already notified the department of English that they will manage 
the financial end of a similar play next year. This is a sign of healthy 
college spirit of the true sort and ought to be encouraging to all who 
contributed in any way to the dramatic success of this year. 



Commencement is the goal towards which each student strives 
and commencement day is the proudest one of one's college course. 
During this week the student bids farewell to his college life, severs the 
bonds which connects him with his college interests and tries to prepare 



Editorial. 



* 



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21 I 



himself for the step out into the world of activity before him. We are 
always glad to see a class graduate on commencement day ; glad that 
we can congratulate them upon the completion of their college course 
and that we can wish them success and happiness in the active world 
which they are entering. And yet there is a tinge of sadness in our 
thoughts as we see each class graduate. College life is an active one, 
the students are brought in close contact with each other and close ties 
are formed. These are hard to break. 

The commencement this year at Lebanon Valley was a very suc- 
cessful one. The weather during the entire week was ideal and there 
was nothing which could mar the pleasure of any one attending the 
exercises. The commencement speakers this year were excellent and 
many valuable lessons have been learned from these prominent men. 
All who took part in any of the various exercises acquitted themselves 
nobly and each one helped in his own way to make this week a bright 
and happy one. 

The graduating class was a large one. The class is one of special 
promise and we know that we will hear from them often as they mingle 
in the various phases of activity before them. We can give to them no 
better benediction than to quote the words of an Irishman : 

"May good luck attind thim, 
And Hiven defind thim." 

X X 

Alumni Notes. 

H. H. Baish, '01, has been elected instructor in the high school at 
Altoona, Pa. 

John R. Wallace, '95, who has been reported dead, writes that he 
is very much alive. We are glad that Mr. Wallace has not passed to 
the "unknown beyond. " 

Among the alumni who visited the College during commence- 
ment week, we noticed the following: 

Adam R. Forney, '72, Annville; J. K. Lehman, a. m., '72, Anu- 
ville; Z. S. G. Light, a. m., '74, Annville; Robert Steinmetz, a. m., 
'74, Annville; I. H. Albright, a. m. ph. d., '76, Reading; Aaron G. 
Herr, '76, Annville; Mrs. Ella J. Deaner, a. m., '77, Annville; H. Clay 
Deaner, A. m., '79, Annville; Emma L. Landis, a.m., '79, Hummels- 



212 



THE FORUM 



town; Henry Wolf, '79, Mount Wolf; Simon P. Light, A. M., '8o, Leb, 
anon; Chas. E. Raucli, A. B., '81, Lebanon; Mrs. Ella M. Light, B. S.- 
'81, Lebanon; Mrs. Millie Brightbill, B. S., '81, Annville; Gideon Krei- 
der, A. M., '83, Annville; Lizzie J. Kinports, B. S., '83, Annville; Anna 
May Saylor, B. S., '84, Annville; M. Ella Moyer, '86, Lebanon; 
Morrison Weimer, A. M. B. D., '87, Rogers, Arkansas; Ben'j. F. 
Daugherty, A. M., '89, Annville; Joseph Daugherty, B. S., York; 
Edward O. Bnrtner, B. S. B. D., Hummelstown; James T. Spangler, A. 
M. B. D., Annville; John W. Owen, B. S. B. D., Mechanicsburg; Lillian 
M. Quigley, B. S., '91, Harrisburg; Mary M. Shenk, B. S., '91, Ann- 
ville; Mrs. Josephine Henry, B.S., '92, Annville; Andrew R. Kreider, 
B. S., '92, Annville; Harry B. Roop, B. S. M. D., Columbia; Hervin U. 
Roop, A. M. Ph. D. L.L.D., Annville; Mrs. Delia F. Daugherty, '92, 
Annville; Mary E. Batdorf, '93, Annville; David S. Eshelman, A. M. 
B. S., '94, Middletown; Maggie Strickler, A. B., '94, Lebanon; Emily 
E. Loose, '94, Palmyra; John H. Maysilles, A. M., '95, Schenectady, N. 
Y.; Ella Nora Black, B. S., '96, Annville; Chas. H. Schlichter, B. S., 
'96, East Pittston; Howard E. Enders, M. S., '97; Mrs. Mary E. 
Albert, B. S., '97, Annville; Norman C. Schlichter, A. M., '97, Ann- 
ville; George A. Ulrich, b. s., m. d., '97, Philadelphia; Chas. B. Wing- 
erd, A. M., B. d. , '97, Shippensburg; Bessie Kinports, B. S., '98, Ann- 
ville; Edwin Kreider, B. S., '98, Annville; EmmaR. Batdorf, B. S., '99, 
Annville; John Batdorf, B. S., '99, Annville; Mrs. Leah C. Wingerd, B. 
S., '99, Shippensburg; Susie F. Herr, B. S., '99, Annville; Alma M. 
Light, M. S., '99, Annville; Harry E. Miller, A. m., b. d., '99, Leba- 
non; Caroline D. Seltzer, B. S., '99, Lebanon; Nellie Buffington, B. S., 
'00, Elizabethville; Fred Weiss Light, B. S., '00, Lebanon; David E. 
Long. B. S., '00, Millersburg; Annie E. Kreider, A. B., '00, Annville; 
Lizzie G. Shroyer, B. S., '00, Highspire; Reba F. Lehman, A. B., '00, 
Annville; A. E. Shroyer, B. S. B. D., '00, Highspire; Chas. E. Snoke, 
A. B. B. D., '00; Harry E. Spessard, A. B., '00, Annville; Hiram H. 
Shenk, A. m., '00, Annville; Arabelle Batdorf, '00, Annville; '01 — Henry 
H. Baish, A. B., Altoona; Edward Balsbaugh, B. S., Lebanon; Morris 
W. Brunner, A. m., D. O., Lebanon; William H. Burd, B. S., Altoona; 
Robert R. Butterwick, A. B. B. D., Palmyra; Frank Emenheiser, B. S., 
Loyville, Md.; Thomas F. Miller, A. B., New York City; Mrs. 
Susie Enders, A. B., Baltimore, Md.; S. Edwin Rupp, A. B., Philadel- 
phia; Lillie Burkey, Lebanon; Ruth Leslie, Harrisburg; '02 — Geo. H, 



THE FORUM 



213 



Albright, B. S., Reading; David D. Buddinger, B. S., Bellegrove; 
Hoffman Derickson. M. S., Annville; Claude R. Engle, B. S., Harris- 
burg; Clinton C. Gohu, B. S., Wormleysburg; Nettie Lockeman, York; 
Elizabeth Stehman, Mountville; Mary Zimmerman, Annville; Emma 
Batdorf, Annville; '03— William C. Arnold, A. M., Annville; Urias J. 
Daugherty, A. B., Dallastown; J. Walter Esbenshade. A. B., Lebanon; 
Sarah E. Helm, A. B., Lebanon; John W. Owen, A. B., Mechanicsburg; 
Lillian Schott, A. B., Paoli; Ralph C. Schaeffer, A. B., Univ. of Mich. 
Paul P. Smith, A. B., Annville; Edith E. Spangler, A. B., Lebanon; 
Grace Nissley, Hummelstown; Virgie Bachman, Annville; Edith Myers, 
Mount Joy; '04— W. Ralph Appenzellar, A. B., Chambersburg; Augus- 
tus Crone, A. B., Greason; Maud E. Engle, A. B., Derry Church; John 
H. Graybill, A. B., Dayton, O.; William M. Grumbein, A. B., Annville; 
Frank Heinaman, A. B., Derry Church; Mary Naomi Light, A. B., 
Parkesburg; Nelle C. Reed, A. B., Rogers, Ark.; Mabel M. Spayd, 
A. B., Mt. Joy; Clara Eisenbaugh, Red Lion; Mame Keller, Schuylkill 
Haven; Florence Boehm, Annville. 

College Notes. 

The sophomore class spent a very pleasant evening at the home of 
Max Lehman on June 6th. 

The annual reception of Dr. and Mrs. Roop to the Senior Class 
and Faculty was given June 9th. 

J. B. Showers has been elected editor-in-chief, and E. E. 
Knauss business manager of the 1907 Bizarre Staff. 

Miss Emily Johnson entertained the senior music students at her 
home on June 6th and on the following evening Miss Smith gave a 
trolley party in their honor. 

The election of the various athletic officers held on June 8, result- 
ed as follows: Manager of Baseball Team, J. B. Hambright; Asst. 
Manager, A. W. Hermann; Manager of Basket Ball Team, J. W. Kauf- 
mann; Asst. Manager, S. H. Waughtel. 

Decoration Day was spent in various ways by the students; a 
crowd of sixteen spent the day at Inwood; some of the students went to 
the Waterworks and other places nearby, and many went home. Every 
one reported having spent a very pleasant day. 



2I 4 



THE FORUM 



The corner stone of the Boys' Dormitory was laid on Tuesday 
afternoon, June 6. Bishop Kephart delivered a short address. 

The 1906 Bizarre has recently made its appearance in a neat brown 
leather cover with gold letters. The Bizarre is a great success in every 
way and reflects much credit on the class as a whole. 

The graduating recitals of the senior music students were given 
during the month of May as follows : Miss Fisher, piano, May 4 ; Mr. 
Crawford, organ, May 9 ; Miss Gabel, piano, May 13 ; Miss Johnson, 
piano, May 18 ; Mr. McKenrick, organ. May 23; Miss Smith, voice, 
May 25 ; Miss Ulrich, piano, May 27 ; Miss Wolf, piano, May 31. The 
recitals as a whole were the best ever given here. 

The annual contest in declamation for freshmen was held on the 
night of June 3. The following program was rendered : 

Piano, Prelude, Miss Amy Gabel ; Keenan's Charge, J. Lester 
Appenzellar ; Samantha's Experiment, Margaret Berlin ; Vocal, The 
Spring Has Come, Cecilia Oldham ; Tobe's Monument, M. O. Billow ; 
Laureame, Anna Garlock ; The Maiden Martyr, Sallie Kreider ; Vocal, 
My Heart's Desire, Miss Grace Schaffner ; For the Chief's Daughter, 
S. B. Long ; A Tampa Romance, Vivian Powers ; Regulus to the 
Carthagiuians, V. D. Singer ; Vocal, Waiting, Miss Edith King ; Swore 
Off, Arthur Spessard ; Bobby Shaftoe, Florence Wolf ; Piano, Last Rose 
of Summer, Miss Emily Johnson. Decision of Judges. The first and 
second prizes were won by Messrs. Spessard and Billow respectively. 
After the programme the class was delightfully entertained at the home 
of Miss Alice Zuck. 



Personals. 

Pearl Mathias spent a few days in Philadelphia this month. 

Misses Schreffler and Kaylor, of Albright, visited Miss Enders 
Sunday, May 21. 

On May 28, Misses Sprout and Miller, of Mechanicsburg, were 
the guests of Miss Harnish. 

Misses Burkholder and Burns, of Mt. Pleasant, were the guests of 
Miss King for a few days this mouth. 



THE FORUM 



215 



Arthur Jones a former student spent a few days with friends. 
H. H. Buffington spent Sunday, June 2, with his brother, Lewis 
R. Buffington. 

Among the visitors during Commencement week were: Miss Fry, 
G f Pinegrove; Mrs. King and son, of Mt. Pleasant; Misses Loyd, 
Rhodeneiser and Fisher, of York; Mr. and Mrs. Wolf, of Mt. Wolf; Mrs. 
Beatty, of Quincy; Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Crowell and Mabel Crowell, of 
York; Mr. and Mrs. Fisher, of York; Mr. Clippinger, of Shippensburg; 
Misses Carrie and Bessie Grose, of Muddy Creek Forks; Mrs. Kaufman, 
son and daughter, Mrs. Rojahn, I. Rojahn, Miss Rachael Daugherty, 
Mrs. Schermeyer, Geo. Daugherty, Charles Daugherty, Mr. Beiler and 
Alice Daugherty, all of Dallastown; Miss McKenrick, of Irving College; 
Mrs. G. D. Owen, Laurel, New Jersey; Sadie Heckert, of Dallastown; 
George and Albert Peters, of Chambersburg; Misses Beck and Spessard, 
of Chewsville, Md.; Mr. and Miss Haverstick, of Carlisle; Mr. and Mrs. 
Benjamin Engle, of Hummelstown; and Prof. Weimer, of Rogers Acad- 
emy, Arkansas. 

X X 

Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. 

The first meeting of the Y. M. C. A. in their new home, the 
lecture room of the Carnegie Library, was held on May the twenty-first. 
Prof. Schlichter gave a short talk on "The Part of Y. M. C. A. in College 
Work." Prof . Shenk spoke on the " Carnegie Gift. " The Male and 
Ladies' Quartette, each rendered a selection. 

Miss Beatty, the State Secretary of the Y. W. C. A. made a flying 
visit to us on June the second. She gave some helpful suggestions for 
the beginning of the new year. 

On June the fourth, J. Edgar Knipp, a returned missionary from 
Japan, gave a short address before the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. on the 
"War in the Far East " not the political one but the religious war, the 
struggle of righteousness and unrighteousness. 

X X 

Society Notes. 

The officers elected by the literary societies for next fall term are 
as follows : 



2l6 



THE FORUM 



Clionian — President, Ora Harnish ; vice-president, Ethel Myers ; 
recording secretary, Effie Shroyer ; corresponding secretary, Laura 
Enders ; critic, Neda Knaub ; chaplain, Iva Maulfair ; pianist, Ethel 
Ulrich ; treasurer, Anna Garlock. 

Kalozetean — President, C. E. Shenk ; vice-president, C. Ray 
Bender ; recording secretary, S. R. Oldham ; corresponding secretary, 
L. F. Maxwell ; critic, J. C. Rupp ; censor, R. G. Light ; chaplain, J. 
W. Kaufmann ; treasurer, C. E. Shenk ; pianist, L. D. Herr ; sergeant- 
at-arms, J. F. Miller ; editor K. L. S. Examiner, J. H. Sprecher. 

Philokosmian — President, J. B. Hambright ; vice-president, J. C. 
Strayer ; treasurer, M. O. Snyder ; recording secretary, S. H. Waughtel; 
corresponding secretary, J. E. Appenzellar ; critic, E. E. Snyder ; chap- 
lain, W. K. Wolf ; janitor, V. D. Singer ; asst. janitor, W. E. Herr ; 
pianist, E. A. Faus ; editor Living Thoughts, M. R. Metzgar. 

ST 3kT 

Baseball 

L. V. C, 17; Albright, 5. 

On June 3, Lebanon Valley played the second of the series of 
games with Albright College, at Annville, and won by the score of 17 to 
5. W. Shenk pitched a fine game for Lebanon Valley, holding Albright 
down to six scattered hits and striking out 17 men. With better support 
he would easily have shut them out. The summary : 
L. V. C. 
Pauxtis, c. 
A. Shenk, 3b. 
Neary, ib. 
Oldham, 2b. 
W. Shenk, p. 
Guyer, ss. 
S. Shenk, rf. 
Buffington, If. 
Maxwell, cf. 



1 



Totals 



R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Albright 


R. 


H. 


O. 


A. 


E. 


I 


O 




3 


I 


J. Kelchner, ss. 





I 





5 


3 


4 


4 


1 





I 


Croman, ib. 


1 


I 


10 








4 


3 


3 





O 


Smoyer, 2b. 





O 





4 


1 


3 


2 


2 


1 


I 


R. Kelchner, c. 


1 


O 


10 





2 











1 


2 


Buck, cf. 


1 


2 


3 


1 











1 


1 


O 


Eisenberger, p. 


1 


I 


1 








1 











I 


Grove, rf. 


1 


I 











2 


2 


1 





I 


Christ, 3b & p. 





O 





1 


1 


2 


2 








O 


Manning, p. 





O 





1 















Wallace, 3b. 





O 





1 


2 


17 


13 


27 


6 


7 
























Totals 


5 


6 


24 


13 


9 



Lebanon Valley 
Albright 



SCORB BY INNINGS 
3 3 1 
OOOOO 



x — 17 
1— 5 




THE 



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Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
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Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
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Thoroughness, Cheapness, Completeness, Commodious Buildings and a Fine 
Campus for Athletic purposes. 

The personal attention given each student secures to him a splendid educa- 
tion under the most stimulating influences. 



&alt TJerm begins Sept. 12, '05; Winter TJerm, fan. 4, '06 
&or further information jfddress 

Pres. Jtervin % Poop, Ph. 7>., 

jinnville, SPa.